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engVid 03 Sep 2019
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Learn 10 Easy 3-Word Questions in English

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"What's the catch?" "Care for another?" "Have you met?" Improve your English conversation skills easily and quickly using these ten short questions. Once you start to use these in your speech, you will sound more like a native speaker, because they are all so commonly used. Since they are short, they are easy to learn too! We use these questions at home, at work, and in social situations. If you have been in an English speaking country or watch English television, you've probably already heard these questions, but you might not understand what they mean. I'll explain each expression, give you examples of how they are used, and let you practice them in a short exercise with me. I believe that by the end of this short video, you'll be able to use these standard questions yourself. Have fun learning these and good luck with your English learning!

Take a quiz on this lesson: http://www.engvid.com/learn-10....-easy-3-word-questio

If you're interested in another short and easy lesson, you can check out my video on 2-word expressions in English here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wxDs7lrNVDY

TRANSCRIPT

Hi. I'm Rebecca from engVid, and in this lesson you're going to learn 10 easy questions that you can use in all kinds of everyday situations. Now, they are really easy so they will not only help you to understand what people are saying, but you can also start to use them yourself. Why? Because all these questions have only three words. All right? And I think, and I know, and I believe that you can learn them. Okay? So let's look at what they are.

Let's go. Number one: "What's the matter?" Okay? If someone says: "What's the matter?" it means: "What's the problem? What's...? What's wrong?" Okay? Now, don't look on this side. This is not the answer, this is not the explanation. These we're going to use later when we do our quiz. So just listen to me to understand what the questions mean first of all. Okay? So: "What's the matter?" means: "What's the problem? What's wrong?"

Number two: "Do you mind?" Now, when do we say: "Do you mind?" What does that mean? "Do you mind?" "Do you mind?" means: "Do you have any objection? Do you have any...? Do you not agree with me for some reason? Do you not accept what I'm about to do?" "Do you mind?" means: "Do you have any problem with what I'm going to do, or say?" or something like that. Okay? "Do you mind?"

Number three: "Have you heard?" Now, some of these are full grammatical questions. Okay? For example: "What's the matter?" is completely and grammatically correct. Some of them that you'll see down here are actually just shortened versions of a fuller question, but because they're used so often people do shorten them. Okay? So keep that in mind also. So: "Have you heard?" If somebody just says: "Have you heard?" why would they say that? Have you heard what? So in what situation do we use this? Usually people will say: "Have you heard?" when there's some sort of big news. Now, it could be big news in terms of world news, it could be big news in terms of in your office, it could be big news in terms of your family. But whatever it is, it is considered by the person who's asking you this to be big news that you either probably have heard about and do know about, or should know about. Okay? So then the person asks you: "Have you heard?" And if you say: "No. Why? What? What are you talking about?" then they tell you. And if you do know, then you say: "Yes, I know, I heard." if it's bad news. Or: "Yes. I heard. She won the lottery. Wow." Okay? So it could be good news or bad news. Next... Of course the way they'll ask the question will vary. If they say: "Have you heard?" that's good news. They say: "Have you heard?" that's not so good news. Okay.

The next one: "Care for another?" Again, this is one of those where we're shortening it. Okay? So: "Care for another?" Another what? Well, it depends on the situation. Usually we're talking about food or drink. So somebody might be saying: "Care for another drink?" "Care for" means: "Would you like? Do you want?" So: "Do you want another drink?", or "Do you want another piece of cake?", or "Do you want another dessert?", or "Do you want another slice of pizza?" So somebody might just say: "Care for another?" instead of saying: "Do you want another something?" Okay?

And the last one here is: "Who is it?" Now, that sounds pretty straightforward, but in some languages we don't use... They don't use "it" so much. So when we're talking about: "Who is it?" are we talking about an animal or a thing? No. Because we said "Who", so we're talking about people. Usually this question we ask when let's say somebody knocks on the door, we say: "Who is it?" Okay? Or let's say you have a phone call and somebody else answers, and then you... You ask... They say: "You have a call", or "You have a phone call." And you say: "Who is it?" Okay? That means: "Who is calling?" or "Who is at the door?" Depends on the situation. All right.

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