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Lec 4 | MIT STS.069 Technology in a Dangerous World
00:01:14
MITCourses
57 Views · 3 years ago

Kendall Hoyt, graduate student, Science, Technology and Society Program

View the complete course at: http://ocw.mit.edu/STS-069F02

License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA
More information at http://ocw.mit.edu/terms
More courses at http://ocw.mit.edu

Lec 3 | MIT STS.069 Technology in a Dangerous World
00:01:14
MITCourses
49 Views · 3 years ago

Abdul Hameed Toor, Visiting Scholar, Center for International Studies (CIS)

View the complete course at: http://ocw.mit.edu/STS-069F02

License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA
More information at http://ocw.mit.edu/terms
More courses at http://ocw.mit.edu

Lec 2 | MIT STS.069 Technology in a Dangerous World
00:06:38
MITCourses
52 Views · 3 years ago

David Mindell, Science, Technology and Society Program

View the complete course at: http://ocw.mit.edu/STS-069F02

License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA
More information at http://ocw.mit.edu/terms
More courses at http://ocw.mit.edu

Lec 1 | MIT STS.069 Technology in a Dangerous World
00:01:25
MITCourses
55 Views · 3 years ago

Hugh Gusterson, Center for International Studies (CIS) and Department of Anthropology

View the complete course at: http://ocw.mit.edu/STS-069F02

License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA
More information at http://ocw.mit.edu/terms
More courses at http://ocw.mit.edu

Mod-01 Lec-41 Concluding Remarks
00:21:28
IIT_Madras
5 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Modern Linguistics by Prof.Shreesh Chaudhary & Prof. Rajesh Kumar,Department of Humanities and Social Sciences,IIT Madras.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in

Mod-01 Lec-39 Discourse
00:44:45
IIT_Madras
8 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Modern Linguistics by Prof.Shreesh Chaudhary & Prof. Rajesh Kumar,Department of Humanities and Social Sciences,IIT Madras.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in

Mod-01 Lec-38 Word Formation-3
00:41:03
IIT_Madras
7 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Modern Linguistics by Prof.Shreesh Chaudhary & Prof. Rajesh Kumar,Department of Humanities and Social Sciences,IIT Madras.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in

Mod-01 Lec-37 Syntax: Exceptional Case Marking
00:48:53
IIT_Madras
4 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Modern Linguistics by Prof.Shreesh Chaudhary & Prof. Rajesh Kumar,Department of Humanities and Social Sciences,IIT Madras.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in

Mod-01 Lec-36 Syntax: Case Assignment
00:47:24
IIT_Madras
10 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Modern Linguistics by Prof.Shreesh Chaudhary & Prof. Rajesh Kumar,Department of Humanities and Social Sciences,IIT Madras.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in

Mod-01 Lec-35 Syntax: Structure of an IP and  Thematic Relations Cont..
00:52:33
IIT_Madras
9 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Modern Linguistics by Prof.Shreesh Chaudhary & Prof. Rajesh Kumar,Department of Humanities and Social Sciences,IIT Madras.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in

Mod-01 Lec-34 Syntax: Structure of an IP and  Thematic Relations Cont..
00:43:58
IIT_Madras
8 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Modern Linguistics by Prof.Shreesh Chaudhary & Prof. Rajesh Kumar,Department of Humanities and Social Sciences,IIT Madras.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in

Mod-01 Lec-33 Syntax: Structure of an IP and  Thematic Relations
00:48:28
IIT_Madras
17 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Modern Linguistics by Prof.Shreesh Chaudhary & Prof. Rajesh Kumar,Department of Humanities and Social Sciences,IIT Madras.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in

Mod-01 Lec-32 Syntax: Argument Selection
00:36:14
IIT_Madras
12 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Modern Linguistics by Prof.Shreesh Chaudhary & Prof. Rajesh Kumar,Department of Humanities and Social Sciences,IIT Madras.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in

Mod-01 Lec-31 Syntax: Phrase Structure  (Compliment and Adjuncts)
00:45:00
IIT_Madras
11 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Modern Linguistics by Prof.Shreesh Chaudhary & Prof. Rajesh Kumar,Department of Humanities and Social Sciences,IIT Madras.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in

Mod-01 Lec-30 Syntax: X-bar Theory Cont…
00:54:53
IIT_Madras
9 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Modern Linguistics by Prof.Shreesh Chaudhary & Prof. Rajesh Kumar,Department of Humanities and Social Sciences,IIT Madras.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in

Mod-01 Lec-29 Syntax: X-bar Theory
00:45:07
IIT_Madras
10 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Modern Linguistics by Prof.Shreesh Chaudhary & Prof. Rajesh Kumar,Department of Humanities and Social Sciences,IIT Madras.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in

Mod-01 Lec-28 Syntax: An Introduction Cont…
00:48:21
IIT_Madras
7 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Modern Linguistics by Prof.Shreesh Chaudhary & Prof. Rajesh Kumar,Department of Humanities and Social Sciences,IIT Madras.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in

Mod-01 Lec-27 Syntax: An Introduction
00:40:43
IIT_Madras
7 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Modern Linguistics by Prof.Shreesh Chaudhary & Prof. Rajesh Kumar,Department of Humanities and Social Sciences,IIT Madras.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in

Mod-01 Lec-26 Affixation
00:47:16
IIT_Madras
10 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Modern Linguistics by Prof.Shreesh Chaudhary & Prof. Rajesh Kumar,Department of Humanities and Social Sciences,IIT Madras.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in

Mod-01 Lec-25 Units of Word Formation
00:39:46
IIT_Madras
9 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Modern Linguistics by Prof.Shreesh Chaudhary & Prof. Rajesh Kumar,Department of Humanities and Social Sciences,IIT Madras.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in

Mod-01 Lec-24 Morphology
00:49:25
IIT_Madras
7 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Modern Linguistics by Prof.Shreesh Chaudhary & Prof. Rajesh Kumar,Department of Humanities and Social Sciences,IIT Madras.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in

Mod-01 Lec-23 Syllable – Based Generalization
00:44:41
IIT_Madras
7 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Modern Linguistics by Prof.Shreesh Chaudhary & Prof. Rajesh Kumar,Department of Humanities and Social Sciences,IIT Madras.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in

Mod-01 Lec-22 Syllable – Based Generalization
00:53:32
IIT_Madras
9 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Modern Linguistics by Prof.Shreesh Chaudhary & Prof. Rajesh Kumar,Department of Humanities and Social Sciences,IIT Madras.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in

Mod-01 Lec-21 Syllable
00:44:18
IIT_Madras
8 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Modern Linguistics by Prof.Shreesh Chaudhary & Prof. Rajesh Kumar,Department of Humanities and Social Sciences,IIT Madras.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in

Mod-01 Lec-20 Syllable Template
00:38:32
IIT_Madras
11 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Modern Linguistics by Prof.Shreesh Chaudhary & Prof. Rajesh Kumar,Department of Humanities and Social Sciences,IIT Madras.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in

Mod-01 Lec-19 Phonological Phenomena
00:47:23
IIT_Madras
6 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Modern Linguistics by Prof.Shreesh Chaudhary & Prof. Rajesh Kumar,Department of Humanities and Social Sciences,IIT Madras.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in

Mod-01 Lec-18 Phonemes & Allophones:
00:45:38
IIT_Madras
5 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Modern Linguistics by Prof.Shreesh Chaudhary & Prof. Rajesh Kumar,Department of Humanities and Social Sciences,IIT Madras.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in

Mod-01 Lec-17 What is Phonology
00:47:40
IIT_Madras
7 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Modern Linguistics by Prof.Shreesh Chaudhary & Prof. Rajesh Kumar,Department of Humanities and Social Sciences,IIT Madras.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in

Mod-01 Lec-16 Review : Production of Speech Sounds
00:45:48
IIT_Madras
14 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Modern Linguistics by Prof.Shreesh Chaudhary & Prof. Rajesh Kumar,Department of Humanities and Social Sciences,IIT Madras.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in

Mod-01 Lec-15 Consonants-2
00:40:02
IIT_Madras
11 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Modern Linguistics by Prof.Shreesh Chaudhary & Prof. Rajesh Kumar,Department of Humanities and Social Sciences,IIT Madras.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in

Mod-01 Lec-14 Consonants
00:39:25
IIT_Madras
6 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Modern Linguistics by Prof.Shreesh Chaudhary & Prof. Rajesh Kumar,Department of Humanities and Social Sciences,IIT Madras.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in

Mod-01 Lec-13 Production of Consonants
00:46:26
IIT_Madras
8 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Modern Linguistics by Prof.Shreesh Chaudhary & Prof. Rajesh Kumar,Department of Humanities and Social Sciences,IIT Madras.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in

Mod-01 Lec-12 Diphthong
00:44:28
IIT_Madras
6 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Modern Linguistics by Prof.Shreesh Chaudhary & Prof. Rajesh Kumar,Department of Humanities and Social Sciences,IIT Madras.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in

Mod-01 Lec-11 English Vowels
00:49:26
IIT_Madras
7 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Modern Linguistics by Prof.Shreesh Chaudhary & Prof. Rajesh Kumar,Department of Humanities and Social Sciences,IIT Madras.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in

Mod-01 Lec-10 Production of Speech Sounds,  Cardinal Vowels
00:48:34
IIT_Madras
9 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Modern Linguistics by Prof.Shreesh Chaudhary & Prof. Rajesh Kumar,Department of Humanities and Social Sciences,IIT Madras.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in

Mod-01 Lec-09 Functions of Vocal Cords
00:50:17
IIT_Madras
6 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Modern Linguistics by Prof.Shreesh Chaudhary & Prof. Rajesh Kumar,Department of Humanities and Social Sciences,IIT Madras.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in

Mod-01 Lec-08 Organs of Articulation
00:46:45
IIT_Madras
9 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Modern Linguistics by Prof.Shreesh Chaudhary & Prof. Rajesh Kumar,Department of Humanities and Social Sciences,IIT Madras.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in

Mod-01 Lec-07 Production of Speech Sounds
00:46:39
IIT_Madras
10 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Modern Linguistics by Prof.Shreesh Chaudhary & Prof. Rajesh Kumar,Department of Humanities and Social Sciences,IIT Madras.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in

Mod-01 Lec-06 Design  Features of Language-5
00:49:37
IIT_Madras
7 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Modern Linguistics by Prof.Shreesh Chaudhary & Prof. Rajesh Kumar,Department of Humanities and Social Sciences,IIT Madras.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in

Mod-01 Lec-05 Design  Features of Language-4
00:48:04
IIT_Madras
6 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Modern Linguistics by Prof.Shreesh Chaudhary & Prof. Rajesh Kumar,Department of Humanities and Social Sciences,IIT Madras.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in

Mod-01 Lec-04 Design  Features of Language-3
00:50:15
IIT_Madras
7 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Modern Linguistics by Prof.Shreesh Chaudhary & Prof. Rajesh Kumar,Department of Humanities and Social Sciences,IIT Madras.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in

Mod-01 Lec-03 Design  Features of Language-2
00:47:44
IIT_Madras
6 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Modern Linguistics by Prof.Shreesh Chaudhary & Prof. Rajesh Kumar,Department of Humanities and Social Sciences,IIT Madras.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in

Mod-01 Lec-02 Design  Features of Language
00:41:50
IIT_Madras
9 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Modern Linguistics by Prof.Shreesh Chaudhary & Prof. Rajesh Kumar,Department of Humanities and Social Sciences,IIT Madras.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in

Mod-01 Lec-01 Introduction
00:48:50
IIT_Madras
8 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Modern Linguistics by Prof.Shreesh Chaudhary & Prof. Rajesh Kumar,Department of Humanities and Social Sciences,IIT Madras.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in

Mod-01 Lec-44 Limitations of first order logic and Introduction to the course
00:58:11
IIT_Kanpur
6 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Logic by Dr. A.V. Ravishankar Sarma,Department of Humanities and Social Sciences,IIT Kanpur.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in

Mod-01 Lec-43 Important theorems in First order Logic
00:45:43
IIT_Kanpur
7 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Logic by Dr. A.V. Ravishankar Sarma,Department of Humanities and Social Sciences,IIT Kanpur.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in

Mod-01 Lec-40 Semantic Tableaux Method for Predicate Logic
00:45:24
IIT_Kanpur
15 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Logic by Dr. A.V. Ravishankar Sarma,Department of Humanities and Social Sciences,IIT Kanpur.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in

Mod-01 Lec-39 Formation Trees for wff’s in predicate Logic
00:44:25
IIT_Kanpur
9 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Logic by Dr. A.V. Ravishankar Sarma,Department of Humanities and Social Sciences,IIT Kanpur.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in

Mod-01 Lec-38 Truth, satisfiability, validity in Predicate Logic
00:37:18
IIT_Kanpur
11 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Logic by Dr. A.V. Ravishankar Sarma,Department of Humanities and Social Sciences,IIT Kanpur.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in

Mod-01 Lec-37 Semantics of Predicate Logic
00:54:23
IIT_Kanpur
9 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Logic by Dr. A.V. Ravishankar Sarma,Department of Humanities and Social Sciences,IIT Kanpur.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in

Mod-01 Lec-36 Translation in to predicate Logic
00:59:21
IIT_Kanpur
5 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Logic by Dr. A.V. Ravishankar Sarma,Department of Humanities and Social Sciences,IIT Kanpur.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in

Mod-01 Lec-32 Outlines of Predicate Logic
00:58:58
IIT_Kanpur
6 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Logic by Dr. A.V. Ravishankar Sarma,Department of Humanities and Social Sciences,IIT Kanpur.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in

Mod-01 Lec-31 Hilbert and Ackermann System
00:58:20
IIT_Kanpur
11 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Logic by Dr. A.V. Ravishankar Sarma,Department of Humanities and Social Sciences,IIT Kanpur.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in

Mod-01 Lec-30 Proofs in the PM system
00:56:27
IIT_Kanpur
6 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Logic by Dr. A.V. Ravishankar Sarma,Department of Humanities and Social Sciences,IIT Kanpur.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in

Mod-01 Lec-29 Hlbert Ackermann Axiomatic system
00:57:03
IIT_Kanpur
8 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Logic by Dr. A.V. Ravishankar Sarma,Department of Humanities and Social Sciences,IIT Kanpur.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in

Mod-01 Lec-28 Axiomatic Propositional Logic
00:56:48
IIT_Kanpur
4 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Logic by Dr. A.V. Ravishankar Sarma,Department of Humanities and Social Sciences,IIT Kanpur.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in

Mod-01 Lec-27 Resolution and refutation method: Examples
00:58:14
IIT_Kanpur
12 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Logic by Dr. A.V. Ravishankar Sarma,Department of Humanities and Social Sciences,IIT Kanpur.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in

Mod-01 Lec-24 Conjunctive and Disjunctive Normal Forms
00:57:38
IIT_Kanpur
11 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Logic by Dr. A.V. Ravishankar Sarma,Department of Humanities and Social Sciences,IIT Kanpur.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in

Mod-01 Lec-23 Natural Deduction: Examples
00:41:02
IIT_Kanpur
6 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Logic by Dr. A.V. Ravishankar Sarma,Department of Humanities and Social Sciences,IIT Kanpur.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in

Mod-01 Lec-22 Natural Deduction Method
00:57:32
IIT_Kanpur
5 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Logic by Dr. A.V. Ravishankar Sarma,Department of Humanities and Social Sciences,IIT Kanpur.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in

Mod-01 Lec-21 Semantic Tableaux Method: Further Examples
00:58:15
IIT_Kanpur
9 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Logic by Dr. A.V. Ravishankar Sarma,Department of Humanities and Social Sciences,IIT Kanpur.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in

Mod-01 Lec-20 Knights and Knaves Puzzles
00:58:53
IIT_Kanpur
9 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Logic by Dr. A.V. Ravishankar Sarma,Department of Humanities and Social Sciences,IIT Kanpur.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in

Mod-01 Lec-19 Semantic Tableaux Method for Propositional Logic
00:58:32
IIT_Kanpur
5 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Logic by Dr. A.V. Ravishankar Sarma,Department of Humanities and Social Sciences,IIT Kanpur.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in

Mod-01 Lec-16 Syntax of Propositional Logic
00:57:10
IIT_Kanpur
2 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Logic by Dr. A.V. Ravishankar Sarma,Department of Humanities and Social Sciences,IIT Kanpur.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in

Mod-01 Lec-14 Syllogistic Poem, Reduction of Syllogisms
00:58:45
IIT_Kanpur
6 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Logic by Dr. A.V. Ravishankar Sarma,Department of Humanities and Social Sciences,IIT Kanpur.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in

Mod-01 Lec-13 Syllogistic Poem, Reduction of Syllogisms
00:57:47
IIT_Kanpur
7 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Logic by Dr. A.V. Ravishankar Sarma,Department of Humanities and Social Sciences,IIT Kanpur.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in

Mod-01 Lec-12 Aristotle theory of Syllogisms-1
00:48:56
IIT_Kanpur
6 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Logic by Dr. A.V. Ravishankar Sarma,Department of Humanities and Social Sciences,IIT Kanpur.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in

Mod-01 Lec-11 Introduction and motivation for Syllogistic Logic
00:57:57
IIT_Kanpur
9 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Logic by Dr. A.V. Ravishankar Sarma,Department of Humanities and Social Sciences,IIT Kanpur.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in

Mod-01 Lec-08 Identification of Formal and Informal Fallacies
00:56:38
IIT_Kanpur
6 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Logic by Dr. A.V. Ravishankar Sarma,Department of Humanities and Social Sciences,IIT Kanpur.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in

Mod-01 Lec-07 Toulmin’s Model of Argumentation
00:49:09
IIT_Kanpur
6 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Logic by Dr. A.V. Ravishankar Sarma,Department of Humanities and Social Sciences,IIT Kanpur.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in

Mod-01 Lec-06 Strength of Inductive arguments, Counter example method
00:52:43
IIT_Kanpur
10 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Logic by Dr. A.V. Ravishankar Sarma,Department of Humanities and Social Sciences,IIT Kanpur.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in

Mod-01 Lec-05 Truth, Validity and Soundness
00:55:23
IIT_Kanpur
17 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Logic by Dr. A.V. Ravishankar Sarma,Department of Humanities and Social Sciences,IIT Kanpur.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in

Mod-01 Lec-04 Nature and Scope of Deductive and Inductive Arguments
00:44:34
IIT_Kanpur
6 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Logic by Dr. A.V. Ravishankar Sarma,Department of Humanities and Social Sciences,IIT Kanpur.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in

العدالة (جامعة هارفرد) المحاضرة 24: الحياة الصالحة
00:29:33
Shamsuna Al Arabia
6 Views · 3 years ago

Harvard
المحاضرة الرابعة والعشرون من مساق العدالة من جامعة هارفرد للبروفيسور مايكل ساندل
وهي عن الحياة الصالحة

رابط المساق
https://youtu.be/1mouk3wiCFA?l....ist=PLgtqMzuQ7viodeY

يمكنكم الاشتراك بقناتنا
https://www.youtube.com/user/s....hamsunalarabia?sub_c

---------------------------------- تعريف بموقعنا -------------------------------------

يوفر موقع "شمسنا العربية" عدد من المساقات المتكاملة والتي تحتوي على فيديوهات
وملفات التمارين والوظائف المنزلية والامتحانات (مع حلها) بالإضافة للمذكرات الدراسية
http://www.shamsunalarabia.org
http://www.facebook.com/shamsunalarabia
https://twitter.com/shamsunalarabia

العدالة (جامعة هارفرد) المحاضرة 23: مناظرة حول الزواج المثلي
00:23:43
Shamsuna Al Arabia
3 Views · 3 years ago

Harvard
المحاضرة الثالثة والعشرون من مساق العدالة من جامعة هارفرد للبروفيسور مايكل ساندل
وهي عن مناظرة حول الزواج المثلي

رابط المساق
https://youtu.be/1mouk3wiCFA?l....ist=PLgtqMzuQ7viodeY

يمكنكم الاشتراك بقناتنا
https://www.youtube.com/user/s....hamsunalarabia?sub_c

---------------------------------- تعريف بموقعنا -------------------------------------

يوفر موقع "شمسنا العربية" عدد من المساقات المتكاملة والتي تحتوي على فيديوهات
وملفات التمارين والوظائف المنزلية والامتحانات (مع حلها) بالإضافة للمذكرات الدراسية
http://www.shamsunalarabia.org
http://www.facebook.com/shamsunalarabia
https://twitter.com/shamsunalarabia

العدالة (جامعة هارفرد) المحاضرة 22: أين يقع إخلاصنا
00:29:38
Shamsuna Al Arabia
3 Views · 3 years ago

Harvard
المحاضرة الثانية والعشرون من مساق العدالة من جامعة هارفرد للبروفيسور مايكل ساندل
وهي عن: أين يقع إخلاصنا؟

رابط المساق
https://youtu.be/1mouk3wiCFA?l....ist=PLgtqMzuQ7viodeY

يمكنكم الاشتراك بقناتنا
https://www.youtube.com/user/s....hamsunalarabia?sub_c

---------------------------------- تعريف بموقعنا -------------------------------------

يوفر موقع "شمسنا العربية" عدد من المساقات المتكاملة والتي تحتوي على فيديوهات
وملفات التمارين والوظائف المنزلية والامتحانات (مع حلها) بالإضافة للمذكرات الدراسية
http://www.shamsunalarabia.org
http://www.facebook.com/shamsunalarabia
https://twitter.com/shamsunalarabia

العدالة (جامعة هارفرد) المحاضرة 21: ادعاءات الالتزام المجتمعي
00:23:38
Shamsuna Al Arabia
4 Views · 3 years ago

Harvard
المحاضرة الحادية والعشرون من مساق العدالة من جامعة هارفرد للبروفيسور مايكل ساندل
وهي عن ادعاءات الالتزام المجتمعي

رابط المساق
https://youtu.be/1mouk3wiCFA?l....ist=PLgtqMzuQ7viodeY

يمكنكم الاشتراك بقناتنا
https://www.youtube.com/user/s....hamsunalarabia?sub_c

---------------------------------- تعريف بموقعنا -------------------------------------

يوفر موقع "شمسنا العربية" عدد من المساقات المتكاملة والتي تحتوي على فيديوهات
وملفات التمارين والوظائف المنزلية والامتحانات (مع حلها) بالإضافة للمذكرات الدراسية
http://www.shamsunalarabia.org
http://www.facebook.com/shamsunalarabia
https://twitter.com/shamsunalarabia

العدالة (جامعة هارفرد) المحاضرة 20: الحرية مقابل الملاءمة
00:26:27
Shamsuna Al Arabia
17 Views · 3 years ago

Harvard
المحاضرة العشرون من مساق العدالة من جامعة هارفرد للبروفيسور مايكل ساندل
وهي عن الحرية مقابل الملاءمة

رابط المساق
https://youtu.be/1mouk3wiCFA?l....ist=PLgtqMzuQ7viodeY

يمكنكم الاشتراك بقناتنا
https://www.youtube.com/user/s....hamsunalarabia?sub_c

---------------------------------- تعريف بموقعنا -------------------------------------

يوفر موقع "شمسنا العربية" عدد من المساقات المتكاملة والتي تحتوي على فيديوهات
وملفات التمارين والوظائف المنزلية والامتحانات (مع حلها) بالإضافة للمذكرات الدراسية
http://www.shamsunalarabia.org
http://www.facebook.com/shamsunalarabia
https://twitter.com/shamsunalarabia

العدالة (جامعة هارفرد) المحاضرة 19: المواطن الصالح
00:26:46
Shamsuna Al Arabia
11 Views · 3 years ago

Harvard
المحاضرة التاسعة عشرة من مساق العدالة من جامعة هارفرد للبروفيسور مايكل ساندل
وهي عن المواطن الصالح

رابط المساق
https://youtu.be/1mouk3wiCFA?l....ist=PLgtqMzuQ7viodeY

يمكنكم الاشتراك بقناتنا
https://www.youtube.com/user/s....hamsunalarabia?sub_c

---------------------------------- تعريف بموقعنا -------------------------------------

يوفر موقع "شمسنا العربية" عدد من المساقات المتكاملة والتي تحتوي على فيديوهات
وملفات التمارين والوظائف المنزلية والامتحانات (مع حلها) بالإضافة للمذكرات الدراسية
http://www.shamsunalarabia.org
http://www.facebook.com/shamsunalarabia
https://twitter.com/shamsunalarabia

العدالة (جامعة هارفرد) المحاضرة 18: ما هو الهدف؟
00:27:40
Shamsuna Al Arabia
7 Views · 3 years ago

Harvard
المحاضرة الثامنة عشرة من مساق العدالة من جامعة هارفرد للبروفيسور مايكل ساندل
وهي عن: ما هو الهدف؟

رابط المساق
https://youtu.be/1mouk3wiCFA?l....ist=PLgtqMzuQ7viodeY

يمكنكم الاشتراك بقناتنا
https://www.youtube.com/user/s....hamsunalarabia?sub_c

---------------------------------- تعريف بموقعنا -------------------------------------

يوفر موقع "شمسنا العربية" عدد من المساقات المتكاملة والتي تحتوي على فيديوهات
وملفات التمارين والوظائف المنزلية والامتحانات (مع حلها) بالإضافة للمذكرات الدراسية
http://www.shamsunalarabia.org
http://www.facebook.com/shamsunalarabia
https://twitter.com/shamsunalarabia

العدالة (جامعة هارفرد) المحاضرة 17: نقاش حول التمييز الإيجابي
00:25:34
Shamsuna Al Arabia
4 Views · 3 years ago

Harvard
المحاضرة السابعة عشرة من مساق العدالة من جامعة هارفرد للبروفيسور مايكل ساندل
وهي عن: نقاش حول التمييز الإيجابي

رابط المساق
https://youtu.be/1mouk3wiCFA?l....ist=PLgtqMzuQ7viodeY

يمكنكم الاشتراك بقناتنا
https://www.youtube.com/user/s....hamsunalarabia?sub_c

---------------------------------- تعريف بموقعنا -------------------------------------

يوفر موقع "شمسنا العربية" عدد من المساقات المتكاملة والتي تحتوي على فيديوهات
وملفات التمارين والوظائف المنزلية والامتحانات (مع حلها) بالإضافة للمذكرات الدراسية
http://www.shamsunalarabia.org
http://www.facebook.com/shamsunalarabia
https://twitter.com/shamsunalarabia

العدالة (جامعة هارفرد) المحاضرة 16: ما الذي نستحقّه؟
00:28:54
Shamsuna Al Arabia
21 Views · 3 years ago

Harvard
المحاضرة السادسة عشرة من مساق العدالة من جامعة هارفرد للبروفيسور مايكل ساندل
وهي عن: ما الذي نستحقّه؟

رابط المساق
https://youtu.be/1mouk3wiCFA?l....ist=PLgtqMzuQ7viodeY

يمكنكم الاشتراك بقناتنا
https://www.youtube.com/user/s....hamsunalarabia?sub_c

---------------------------------- تعريف بموقعنا -------------------------------------

يوفر موقع "شمسنا العربية" عدد من المساقات المتكاملة والتي تحتوي على فيديوهات
وملفات التمارين والوظائف المنزلية والامتحانات (مع حلها) بالإضافة للمذكرات الدراسية
http://www.shamsunalarabia.org
http://www.facebook.com/shamsunalarabia
https://twitter.com/shamsunalarabia

العدالة (جامعة هارفرد) المحاضرة 15: ما هي نقطة الانطلاق العادلة؟
00:24:19
Shamsuna Al Arabia
2 Views · 3 years ago

Harvard
المحاضرة الخامسة عشرة من مساق العدالة من جامعة هارفرد للبروفيسور مايكل ساندل
وهي عن: ما هي نقطة الانطلاق العادلة؟

رابط المساق
https://youtu.be/1mouk3wiCFA?l....ist=PLgtqMzuQ7viodeY

يمكنكم الاشتراك بقناتنا
https://www.youtube.com/user/s....hamsunalarabia?sub_c

---------------------------------- تعريف بموقعنا -------------------------------------

يوفر موقع "شمسنا العربية" عدد من المساقات المتكاملة والتي تحتوي على فيديوهات
وملفات التمارين والوظائف المنزلية والامتحانات (مع حلها) بالإضافة للمذكرات الدراسية
http://www.shamsunalarabia.org
http://www.facebook.com/shamsunalarabia
https://twitter.com/shamsunalarabia

العدالة (جامعة هارفرد) المحاضرة 14: الاتفاق هو الاتفاق
00:31:00
Shamsuna Al Arabia
5 Views · 3 years ago

Harvard
المحاضرة الرابعة عشرة من مساق العدالة من جامعة هارفرد للبروفيسور مايكل ساندل
وهي عن: الاتفاق هو الاتفاق

رابط المساق
https://youtu.be/1mouk3wiCFA?l....ist=PLgtqMzuQ7viodeY

يمكنكم الاشتراك بقناتنا
https://www.youtube.com/user/s....hamsunalarabia?sub_c

---------------------------------- تعريف بموقعنا -------------------------------------

يوفر موقع "شمسنا العربية" عدد من المساقات المتكاملة والتي تحتوي على فيديوهات
وملفات التمارين والوظائف المنزلية والامتحانات (مع حلها) بالإضافة للمذكرات الدراسية
http://www.shamsunalarabia.org
http://www.facebook.com/shamsunalarabia
https://twitter.com/shamsunalarabia

العدالة (جامعة هارفرد) المحاضرة 13: درس في الكذب
00:22:13
Shamsuna Al Arabia
3 Views · 3 years ago

Harvard
المحاضرة الثالثة عشرة من مساق العدالة من جامعة هارفرد للبروفيسور مايكل ساندل
وهي عن: درس في الكذب

رابط المساق
https://youtu.be/1mouk3wiCFA?l....ist=PLgtqMzuQ7viodeY

يمكنكم الاشتراك بقناتنا
https://www.youtube.com/user/s....hamsunalarabia?sub_c

---------------------------------- تعريف بموقعنا -------------------------------------

يوفر موقع "شمسنا العربية" عدد من المساقات المتكاملة والتي تحتوي على فيديوهات
وملفات التمارين والوظائف المنزلية والامتحانات (مع حلها) بالإضافة للمذكرات الدراسية
http://www.shamsunalarabia.org
http://www.facebook.com/shamsunalarabia
https://twitter.com/shamsunalarabia

العدالة (جامعة هارفرد) المحاضرة 11: انتبه لدوافعك
00:28:08
Shamsuna Al Arabia
3 Views · 3 years ago

Harvard
المحاضرة الحادية عشرة من مساق العدالة من جامعة هارفرد للبروفيسور مايكل ساندل
وهي عن: انتبه لدوافعك

رابط المساق
https://youtu.be/1mouk3wiCFA?l....ist=PLgtqMzuQ7viodeY

يمكنكم الاشتراك بقناتنا
https://www.youtube.com/user/s....hamsunalarabia?sub_c

---------------------------------- تعريف بموقعنا -------------------------------------

يوفر موقع "شمسنا العربية" عدد من المساقات المتكاملة والتي تحتوي على فيديوهات
وملفات التمارين والوظائف المنزلية والامتحانات (مع حلها) بالإضافة للمذكرات الدراسية
http://www.shamsunalarabia.org
http://www.facebook.com/shamsunalarabia
https://twitter.com/shamsunalarabia

العدالة (جامعة هارفرد) المحاضرة 10: أمومة للبيع
00:26:46
Shamsuna Al Arabia
5 Views · 3 years ago

Harvard
المحاضرة العاشرة من مساق العدالة من جامعة هارفرد للبروفيسور مايكل ساندل
وهي عن: أمومة للبيع

رابط المساق
https://youtu.be/1mouk3wiCFA?l....ist=PLgtqMzuQ7viodeY

يمكنكم الاشتراك بقناتنا
https://www.youtube.com/user/s....hamsunalarabia?sub_c

---------------------------------- تعريف بموقعنا -------------------------------------

يوفر موقع "شمسنا العربية" عدد من المساقات المتكاملة والتي تحتوي على فيديوهات
وملفات التمارين والوظائف المنزلية والامتحانات (مع حلها) بالإضافة للمذكرات الدراسية
http://www.shamsunalarabia.org
http://www.facebook.com/shamsunalarabia
https://twitter.com/shamsunalarabia

العدالة (جامعة هارفرد) المحاضرة 09: بنادق للإيجار
00:26:50
Shamsuna Al Arabia
6 Views · 3 years ago

Harvard
المحاضرة التاسعة من مساق العدالة من جامعة هارفرد للبروفيسور مايكل ساندل
وهي عن: بنادق للإيجار

رابط المساق
https://youtu.be/1mouk3wiCFA?l....ist=PLgtqMzuQ7viodeY

يمكنكم الاشتراك بقناتنا
https://www.youtube.com/user/s....hamsunalarabia?sub_c

---------------------------------- تعريف بموقعنا -------------------------------------

يوفر موقع "شمسنا العربية" عدد من المساقات المتكاملة والتي تحتوي على فيديوهات
وملفات التمارين والوظائف المنزلية والامتحانات (مع حلها) بالإضافة للمذكرات الدراسية
http://www.shamsunalarabia.org
http://www.facebook.com/shamsunalarabia
https://twitter.com/shamsunalarabia

العدالة (جامعة هارفرد) المحاضرة 08: موافقة البالغين
00:27:58
Shamsuna Al Arabia
2 Views · 3 years ago

Harvard
المحاضرة الثامنة من مساق العدالة من جامعة هارفرد للبروفيسور مايكل ساندل
وهي عن موافقة البالغين

رابط المساق
https://youtu.be/1mouk3wiCFA?l....ist=PLgtqMzuQ7viodeY

يمكنكم الاشتراك بقناتنا
https://www.youtube.com/user/s....hamsunalarabia?sub_c

---------------------------------- تعريف بموقعنا -------------------------------------

يوفر موقع "شمسنا العربية" عدد من المساقات المتكاملة والتي تحتوي على فيديوهات
وملفات التمارين والوظائف المنزلية والامتحانات (مع حلها) بالإضافة للمذكرات الدراسية
http://www.shamsunalarabia.org
http://www.facebook.com/shamsunalarabia
https://twitter.com/shamsunalarabia

العدالة (جامعة هارفرد) المحاضرة 07: هذه الأرض أرضي
00:24:56
Shamsuna Al Arabia
4 Views · 3 years ago

Harvard
المحاضرة السابعة من مساق العدالة من جامعة هارفرد للبروفيسور مايكل ساندل
وهي عن: هذه الأرض أرضي

رابط المساق
https://youtu.be/1mouk3wiCFA?l....ist=PLgtqMzuQ7viodeY

يمكنكم الاشتراك بقناتنا
https://www.youtube.com/user/s....hamsunalarabia?sub_c

---------------------------------- تعريف بموقعنا -------------------------------------

يوفر موقع "شمسنا العربية" عدد من المساقات المتكاملة والتي تحتوي على فيديوهات
وملفات التمارين والوظائف المنزلية والامتحانات (مع حلها) بالإضافة للمذكرات الدراسية
http://www.shamsunalarabia.org
http://www.facebook.com/shamsunalarabia
https://twitter.com/shamsunalarabia

العدالة (جامعة هارفرد) المحاضرة 06: من يَمْلِكني؟
00:26:04
Shamsuna Al Arabia
3 Views · 3 years ago

Harvard
المحاضرة السادسة من مساق العدالة من جامعة هارفرد للبروفيسور مايكل ساندل
وهي عن: من يَمْلِكني؟

رابط المساق
https://youtu.be/1mouk3wiCFA?l....ist=PLgtqMzuQ7viodeY

يمكنكم الاشتراك بقناتنا
https://www.youtube.com/user/s....hamsunalarabia?sub_c

---------------------------------- تعريف بموقعنا -------------------------------------

يوفر موقع "شمسنا العربية" عدد من المساقات المتكاملة والتي تحتوي على فيديوهات
وملفات التمارين والوظائف المنزلية والامتحانات (مع حلها) بالإضافة للمذكرات الدراسية
http://www.shamsunalarabia.org
http://www.facebook.com/shamsunalarabia
https://twitter.com/shamsunalarabia

العدالة (جامعة هارفرد) المحاضرة 05: حرية الاختيار
00:27:05
Shamsuna Al Arabia
4 Views · 3 years ago

Harvard
المحاضرة الخامسة من مساق العدالة من جامعة هارفرد للبروفيسور مايكل ساندل
وهي عن حرية الاختيار

رابط المساق
https://youtu.be/1mouk3wiCFA?l....ist=PLgtqMzuQ7viodeY

يمكنكم الاشتراك بقناتنا
https://www.youtube.com/user/s....hamsunalarabia?sub_c

---------------------------------- تعريف بموقعنا -------------------------------------

يوفر موقع "شمسنا العربية" عدد من المساقات المتكاملة والتي تحتوي على فيديوهات
وملفات التمارين والوظائف المنزلية والامتحانات (مع حلها) بالإضافة للمذكرات الدراسية
http://www.shamsunalarabia.org
http://www.facebook.com/shamsunalarabia
https://twitter.com/shamsunalarabia

العدالة (جامعة هارفرد) المحاضرة 04: كيف نقيس المتعة والمسرّة
00:29:14
Shamsuna Al Arabia
5 Views · 3 years ago

Harvard
المحاضرة الرابعة من مساق العدالة من جامعة هارفرد للبروفيسور مايكل ساندل
وهي عن: كيف نقيس المتعة والمسرّة

رابط المساق
https://youtu.be/1mouk3wiCFA?l....ist=PLgtqMzuQ7viodeY

يمكنكم الاشتراك بقناتنا
https://www.youtube.com/user/s....hamsunalarabia?sub_c

---------------------------------- تعريف بموقعنا -------------------------------------

يوفر موقع "شمسنا العربية" عدد من المساقات المتكاملة والتي تحتوي على فيديوهات
وملفات التمارين والوظائف المنزلية والامتحانات (مع حلها) بالإضافة للمذكرات الدراسية
http://www.shamsunalarabia.org
http://www.facebook.com/shamsunalarabia
https://twitter.com/shamsunalarabia

العدالة (جامعة هارفرد) المحاضرة 03: "ثمن" الحياة
00:23:57
Shamsuna Al Arabia
29 Views · 3 years ago

Harvard
المحاضرة الثالثة من مساق العدالة من جامعة هارفرد للبروفيسور مايكل ساندل
وهي عن "ثمن" الحياة

رابط المساق
https://youtu.be/1mouk3wiCFA?l....ist=PLgtqMzuQ7viodeY

يمكنكم الاشتراك بقناتنا
https://www.youtube.com/user/s....hamsunalarabia?sub_c

---------------------------------- تعريف بموقعنا -------------------------------------

يوفر موقع "شمسنا العربية" عدد من المساقات المتكاملة والتي تحتوي على فيديوهات
وملفات التمارين والوظائف المنزلية والامتحانات (مع حلها) بالإضافة للمذكرات الدراسية
http://www.shamsunalarabia.org
http://www.facebook.com/shamsunalarabia
https://twitter.com/shamsunalarabia

العدالة (جامعة هارفرد) المحاضرة 02: قضية أكلة لحوم البشر
00:29:08
Shamsuna Al Arabia
2 Views · 3 years ago

Harvard
المحاضرة الثانية من مساق العدالة من جامعة هارفرد للبروفيسور مايكل ساندل
وهي عن قضية أكلة لحوم البشر

رابط المساق
https://youtu.be/1mouk3wiCFA?l....ist=PLgtqMzuQ7viodeY

يمكنكم الاشتراك بقناتنا
https://www.youtube.com/user/s....hamsunalarabia?sub_c

---------------------------------- تعريف بموقعنا -------------------------------------

يوفر موقع "شمسنا العربية" عدد من المساقات المتكاملة والتي تحتوي على فيديوهات
وملفات التمارين والوظائف المنزلية والامتحانات (مع حلها) بالإضافة للمذكرات الدراسية
http://www.shamsunalarabia.org
http://www.facebook.com/shamsunalarabia
https://twitter.com/shamsunalarabia

العدالة (جامعة هارفرد) المحاضرة 01: الجانب الأخلاقي لجريمة القتل
00:23:57
Shamsuna Al Arabia
6 Views · 3 years ago

Harvard
المحاضرة الأولى من مساق العدالة من جامعة هارفرد للبروفيسور مايكل ساندل
وهي عن الجانب الأخلاقي لجريمة القتل

رابط المساق
https://youtu.be/1mouk3wiCFA?l....ist=PLgtqMzuQ7viodeY

يمكنكم الاشتراك بقناتنا
https://www.youtube.com/user/s....hamsunalarabia?sub_c

---------------------------------- تعريف بموقعنا -------------------------------------

يوفر موقع "شمسنا العربية" عدد من المساقات المتكاملة والتي تحتوي على فيديوهات
وملفات التمارين والوظائف المنزلية والامتحانات (مع حلها) بالإضافة للمذكرات الدراسية
http://www.shamsunalarabia.org
http://www.facebook.com/shamsunalarabia
https://twitter.com/shamsunalarabia

نبذة عن مساق العدالة مع البروفيسور مايكل ساندل من جامعة هارفرد
00:04:15
Shamsuna Al Arabia
30 Views · 3 years ago

Harvard
مساق العدالة من جامعة هارفرد هو واحد من أشهر مساقات جامعة هارفرد. ويناقش أفكاراً فلسفية وفلسفية سياسية تتناول مواضيع العدالة، المساواة، الديموقراطية والمواطنة. يناقش هذا المساق أسئلة مثل: هل يمكن تبرير التعذيب؟ هل ستسرق دواءً يحتاجه طفلك للبقاء على قيد الحياة؟ هل من الخطأ أحياناً قول الحقيقة؟ كم يبلغ "ثمن" حياة الإنسان؟
يقدمه المساق البروفيسور "مايكل ساندل

رابط المساق
https://youtu.be/1mouk3wiCFA?l....ist=PLgtqMzuQ7viodeY

يمكنكم الاشتراك بقناتنا
https://www.youtube.com/user/s....hamsunalarabia?sub_c

---------------------------------- تعريف بموقعنا -------------------------------------

يوفر موقع "شمسنا العربية" عدد من المساقات المتكاملة والتي تحتوي على فيديوهات
وملفات التمارين والوظائف المنزلية والامتحانات (مع حلها) بالإضافة للمذكرات الدراسية
http://www.shamsunalarabia.org
http://www.facebook.com/shamsunalarabia
https://twitter.com/shamsunalarabia

حماية المدنيين [المحاضرة: 13/13]
01:13:53
iugaza1
18 Views · 3 years ago

اسم المساق: حقوق الإنسان في الشريعة والقانون
اسم المحاضر: د. عاطف محمد أبو هربيد
الكلية: الشريعة والقانون
القسم: الشريعة الإسلامية
وصف المساق :
يدرس هذا المساق:
1. تعريف حقوق الإنسان وأنواعها، ولمحة تاريخية عن الوثائق التي صدرت بشأن حقوق الإنسان، والضمانات التي توفرها الشريعة لهذه الحقوق.
2. الحرية بفروعها؛ الحرية السياسية بما في ذلك حرية الانتماء (الديمقراطية)، وحرية الترشيح وتولي الوظائف العامة، ثم الحريات الفردية.
3. حق حماية الأنفس والأعراض والأموال والأنساب.
4. الحق في العدل والمساواة بفروعهما.
5. أبرز التطبيقات للحقوق السابقة في الشريعة والقانون.

مركز التميز الأكاديمي:

http://quality.iugaza.edu.ps/E....xcellenceCenter/ar/D

قائمة محاضرات المساق:
http://www.youtube.com/playlis....t?list=PL9fwy3NUQKwZ

الجامعة الإسلامية غزة:
http://www.iugaza.edu.ps/ar
قناة مركز التميز الأكاديمي بالجامعة الإسلامية - غزة على YouTube :
http://www.youtube.com/iugaza1

حماية الأسرى [المحاضرة: 12/13]
01:27:35
iugaza1
17 Views · 3 years ago

اسم المساق: حقوق الإنسان في الشريعة والقانون
اسم المحاضر: د. عاطف محمد أبو هربيد
الكلية: الشريعة والقانون
القسم: الشريعة الإسلامية
وصف المساق :
يدرس هذا المساق:
1. تعريف حقوق الإنسان وأنواعها، ولمحة تاريخية عن الوثائق التي صدرت بشأن حقوق الإنسان، والضمانات التي توفرها الشريعة لهذه الحقوق.
2. الحرية بفروعها؛ الحرية السياسية بما في ذلك حرية الانتماء (الديمقراطية)، وحرية الترشيح وتولي الوظائف العامة، ثم الحريات الفردية.
3. حق حماية الأنفس والأعراض والأموال والأنساب.
4. الحق في العدل والمساواة بفروعهما.
5. أبرز التطبيقات للحقوق السابقة في الشريعة والقانون.

مركز التميز الأكاديمي:

http://quality.iugaza.edu.ps/E....xcellenceCenter/ar/D

قائمة محاضرات المساق:
http://www.youtube.com/playlis....t?list=PL9fwy3NUQKwZ

الجامعة الإسلامية غزة:
http://www.iugaza.edu.ps/ar
قناة مركز التميز الأكاديمي بالجامعة الإسلامية - غزة على YouTube :
http://www.youtube.com/iugaza1

مبادئ القانون الدولي الإنساني [المحاضرة: 11/13]
01:29:53
iugaza1
7 Views · 3 years ago

اسم المساق: حقوق الإنسان في الشريعة والقانون
اسم المحاضر: د. عاطف محمد أبو هربيد
الكلية: الشريعة والقانون
القسم: الشريعة الإسلامية
وصف المساق :
يدرس هذا المساق:
1. تعريف حقوق الإنسان وأنواعها، ولمحة تاريخية عن الوثائق التي صدرت بشأن حقوق الإنسان، والضمانات التي توفرها الشريعة لهذه الحقوق.
2. الحرية بفروعها؛ الحرية السياسية بما في ذلك حرية الانتماء (الديمقراطية)، وحرية الترشيح وتولي الوظائف العامة، ثم الحريات الفردية.
3. حق حماية الأنفس والأعراض والأموال والأنساب.
4. الحق في العدل والمساواة بفروعهما.
5. أبرز التطبيقات للحقوق السابقة في الشريعة والقانون.

مركز التميز الأكاديمي:

http://quality.iugaza.edu.ps/E....xcellenceCenter/ar/D

قائمة محاضرات المساق:
http://www.youtube.com/playlis....t?list=PL9fwy3NUQKwZ

الجامعة الإسلامية غزة:
http://www.iugaza.edu.ps/ar
قناة مركز التميز الأكاديمي بالجامعة الإسلامية - غزة على YouTube :
http://www.youtube.com/iugaza1

القانون الدولي الإنساني [المحاضرة: 10/13]
01:36:10
iugaza1
14 Views · 3 years ago

اسم المساق: حقوق الإنسان في الشريعة والقانون
اسم المحاضر: د. عاطف محمد أبو هربيد
الكلية: الشريعة والقانون
القسم: الشريعة الإسلامية
وصف المساق :
يدرس هذا المساق:
1. تعريف حقوق الإنسان وأنواعها، ولمحة تاريخية عن الوثائق التي صدرت بشأن حقوق الإنسان، والضمانات التي توفرها الشريعة لهذه الحقوق.
2. الحرية بفروعها؛ الحرية السياسية بما في ذلك حرية الانتماء (الديمقراطية)، وحرية الترشيح وتولي الوظائف العامة، ثم الحريات الفردية.
3. حق حماية الأنفس والأعراض والأموال والأنساب.
4. الحق في العدل والمساواة بفروعهما.
5. أبرز التطبيقات للحقوق السابقة في الشريعة والقانون.

مركز التميز الأكاديمي:

http://quality.iugaza.edu.ps/E....xcellenceCenter/ar/D

قائمة محاضرات المساق:
http://www.youtube.com/playlis....t?list=PL9fwy3NUQKwZ

الجامعة الإسلامية غزة:
http://www.iugaza.edu.ps/ar
قناة مركز التميز الأكاديمي بالجامعة الإسلامية - غزة على YouTube :
http://www.youtube.com/iugaza1

حق الانتخاب ـ حق الترشيح ـ حق تولي الوظائف العامة [المحاضرة: 9/13]
01:31:23
iugaza1
4 Views · 3 years ago

اسم المساق: حقوق الإنسان في الشريعة والقانون
اسم المحاضر: د. عاطف محمد أبو هربيد
الكلية: الشريعة والقانون
القسم: الشريعة الإسلامية
وصف المساق :
يدرس هذا المساق:
1. تعريف حقوق الإنسان وأنواعها، ولمحة تاريخية عن الوثائق التي صدرت بشأن حقوق الإنسان، والضمانات التي توفرها الشريعة لهذه الحقوق.
2. الحرية بفروعها؛ الحرية السياسية بما في ذلك حرية الانتماء (الديمقراطية)، وحرية الترشيح وتولي الوظائف العامة، ثم الحريات الفردية.
3. حق حماية الأنفس والأعراض والأموال والأنساب.
4. الحق في العدل والمساواة بفروعهما.
5. أبرز التطبيقات للحقوق السابقة في الشريعة والقانون.

مركز التميز الأكاديمي:

http://quality.iugaza.edu.ps/E....xcellenceCenter/ar/D

قائمة محاضرات المساق:
http://www.youtube.com/playlis....t?list=PL9fwy3NUQKwZ

الجامعة الإسلامية غزة:
http://www.iugaza.edu.ps/ar
قناة مركز التميز الأكاديمي بالجامعة الإسلامية - غزة على YouTube :
http://www.youtube.com/iugaza1

وسائل إسناد الحكم في الشريعة الإسلامية [المحاضرة: 8/13]
01:36:19
iugaza1
18 Views · 3 years ago

اسم المساق: حقوق الإنسان في الشريعة والقانون
اسم المحاضر: د. عاطف محمد أبو هربيد
الكلية: الشريعة والقانون
القسم: الشريعة الإسلامية
وصف المساق :
يدرس هذا المساق:
1. تعريف حقوق الإنسان وأنواعها، ولمحة تاريخية عن الوثائق التي صدرت بشأن حقوق الإنسان، والضمانات التي توفرها الشريعة لهذه الحقوق.
2. الحرية بفروعها؛ الحرية السياسية بما في ذلك حرية الانتماء (الديمقراطية)، وحرية الترشيح وتولي الوظائف العامة، ثم الحريات الفردية.
3. حق حماية الأنفس والأعراض والأموال والأنساب.
4. الحق في العدل والمساواة بفروعهما.
5. أبرز التطبيقات للحقوق السابقة في الشريعة والقانون.

مركز التميز الأكاديمي:

http://quality.iugaza.edu.ps/E....xcellenceCenter/ar/D

قائمة محاضرات المساق:
http://www.youtube.com/playlis....t?list=PL9fwy3NUQKwZ

الجامعة الإسلامية غزة:
http://www.iugaza.edu.ps/ar
قناة مركز التميز الأكاديمي بالجامعة الإسلامية - غزة على YouTube :
http://www.youtube.com/iugaza1

حق الانتخاب ـ النظم الإنتخابية [المحاضرة: 7/13]
01:26:45
iugaza1
7 Views · 3 years ago

اسم المساق: حقوق الإنسان في الشريعة والقانون
اسم المحاضر: د. عاطف محمد أبو هربيد
الكلية: الشريعة والقانون
القسم: الشريعة الإسلامية
وصف المساق :
يدرس هذا المساق:
1. تعريف حقوق الإنسان وأنواعها، ولمحة تاريخية عن الوثائق التي صدرت بشأن حقوق الإنسان، والضمانات التي توفرها الشريعة لهذه الحقوق.
2. الحرية بفروعها؛ الحرية السياسية بما في ذلك حرية الانتماء (الديمقراطية)، وحرية الترشيح وتولي الوظائف العامة، ثم الحريات الفردية.
3. حق حماية الأنفس والأعراض والأموال والأنساب.
4. الحق في العدل والمساواة بفروعهما.
5. أبرز التطبيقات للحقوق السابقة في الشريعة والقانون.

مركز التميز الأكاديمي:

http://quality.iugaza.edu.ps/E....xcellenceCenter/ar/D

قائمة محاضرات المساق:
http://www.youtube.com/playlis....t?list=PL9fwy3NUQKwZ

الجامعة الإسلامية غزة:
http://www.iugaza.edu.ps/ar
قناة مركز التميز الأكاديمي بالجامعة الإسلامية - غزة على YouTube :
http://www.youtube.com/iugaza1

الفرق بين الشورى والديمقراطية ـ وسائل اسناد الحكم [المحاضرة: 6/13]
01:14:22
iugaza1
10 Views · 3 years ago

اسم المساق: حقوق الإنسان في الشريعة والقانون
اسم المحاضر: د. عاطف محمد أبو هربيد
الكلية: الشريعة والقانون
القسم: الشريعة الإسلامية
وصف المساق :
يدرس هذا المساق:
1. تعريف حقوق الإنسان وأنواعها، ولمحة تاريخية عن الوثائق التي صدرت بشأن حقوق الإنسان، والضمانات التي توفرها الشريعة لهذه الحقوق.
2. الحرية بفروعها؛ الحرية السياسية بما في ذلك حرية الانتماء (الديمقراطية)، وحرية الترشيح وتولي الوظائف العامة، ثم الحريات الفردية.
3. حق حماية الأنفس والأعراض والأموال والأنساب.
4. الحق في العدل والمساواة بفروعهما.
5. أبرز التطبيقات للحقوق السابقة في الشريعة والقانون.

مركز التميز الأكاديمي:

http://quality.iugaza.edu.ps/E....xcellenceCenter/ar/D

قائمة محاضرات المساق:
http://www.youtube.com/playlis....t?list=PL9fwy3NUQKwZ

الجامعة الإسلامية غزة:
http://www.iugaza.edu.ps/ar
قناة مركز التميز الأكاديمي بالجامعة الإسلامية - غزة على YouTube :
http://www.youtube.com/iugaza1

موقف الإسلام من الديمقراطية [المحاضرة: 5/13]
01:37:19
iugaza1
9 Views · 3 years ago

اسم المساق: حقوق الإنسان في الشريعة والقانون
اسم المحاضر: د. عاطف محمد أبو هربيد
الكلية: الشريعة والقانون
القسم: الشريعة الإسلامية
وصف المساق :
يدرس هذا المساق:
1. تعريف حقوق الإنسان وأنواعها، ولمحة تاريخية عن الوثائق التي صدرت بشأن حقوق الإنسان، والضمانات التي توفرها الشريعة لهذه الحقوق.
2. الحرية بفروعها؛ الحرية السياسية بما في ذلك حرية الانتماء (الديمقراطية)، وحرية الترشيح وتولي الوظائف العامة، ثم الحريات الفردية.
3. حق حماية الأنفس والأعراض والأموال والأنساب.
4. الحق في العدل والمساواة بفروعهما.
5. أبرز التطبيقات للحقوق السابقة في الشريعة والقانون.

مركز التميز الأكاديمي:

http://quality.iugaza.edu.ps/E....xcellenceCenter/ar/D

قائمة محاضرات المساق:
http://www.youtube.com/playlis....t?list=PL9fwy3NUQKwZ

الجامعة الإسلامية غزة:
http://www.iugaza.edu.ps/ar
قناة مركز التميز الأكاديمي بالجامعة الإسلامية - غزة على YouTube :
http://www.youtube.com/iugaza1

مكانة الحرية في الإسلام [المحاضرة: 4/13]
01:30:21
iugaza1
14 Views · 3 years ago

اسم المساق: حقوق الإنسان في الشريعة والقانون
اسم المحاضر: د. عاطف محمد أبو هربيد
الكلية: الشريعة والقانون
القسم: الشريعة الإسلامية
وصف المساق :
يدرس هذا المساق:
1. تعريف حقوق الإنسان وأنواعها، ولمحة تاريخية عن الوثائق التي صدرت بشأن حقوق الإنسان، والضمانات التي توفرها الشريعة لهذه الحقوق.
2. الحرية بفروعها؛ الحرية السياسية بما في ذلك حرية الانتماء (الديمقراطية)، وحرية الترشيح وتولي الوظائف العامة، ثم الحريات الفردية.
3. حق حماية الأنفس والأعراض والأموال والأنساب.
4. الحق في العدل والمساواة بفروعهما.
5. أبرز التطبيقات للحقوق السابقة في الشريعة والقانون.

مركز التميز الأكاديمي:

http://quality.iugaza.edu.ps/E....xcellenceCenter/ar/D

قائمة محاضرات المساق:
http://www.youtube.com/playlis....t?list=PL9fwy3NUQKwZ

الجامعة الإسلامية غزة:
http://www.iugaza.edu.ps/ar
قناة مركز التميز الأكاديمي بالجامعة الإسلامية - غزة على YouTube :
http://www.youtube.com/iugaza1

تعريف مصطلح حقوق الإنسان وتقييم الوثائق الدولية [المحاضرة: 3/13]
01:40:59
iugaza1
8 Views · 3 years ago

اسم المساق: حقوق الإنسان في الشريعة والقانون
اسم المحاضر: د. عاطف محمد أبو هربيد
الكلية: الشريعة والقانون
القسم: الشريعة الإسلامية
وصف المساق :
يدرس هذا المساق:
1. تعريف حقوق الإنسان وأنواعها، ولمحة تاريخية عن الوثائق التي صدرت بشأن حقوق الإنسان، والضمانات التي توفرها الشريعة لهذه الحقوق.
2. الحرية بفروعها؛ الحرية السياسية بما في ذلك حرية الانتماء (الديمقراطية)، وحرية الترشيح وتولي الوظائف العامة، ثم الحريات الفردية.
3. حق حماية الأنفس والأعراض والأموال والأنساب.
4. الحق في العدل والمساواة بفروعهما.
5. أبرز التطبيقات للحقوق السابقة في الشريعة والقانون.

مركز التميز الأكاديمي:

http://quality.iugaza.edu.ps/E....xcellenceCenter/ar/D

قائمة محاضرات المساق:
http://www.youtube.com/playlis....t?list=PL9fwy3NUQKwZ

الجامعة الإسلامية غزة:
http://www.iugaza.edu.ps/ar
قناة مركز التميز الأكاديمي بالجامعة الإسلامية - غزة على YouTube :
http://www.youtube.com/iugaza1

مدلول حقوق الإنسان [المحاضرة: 2/13]
01:14:34
iugaza1
12 Views · 3 years ago

اسم المساق: حقوق الإنسان في الشريعة والقانون
اسم المحاضر: د. عاطف محمد أبو هربيد
الكلية: الشريعة والقانون
القسم: الشريعة الإسلامية
وصف المساق :
يدرس هذا المساق:
1. تعريف حقوق الإنسان وأنواعها، ولمحة تاريخية عن الوثائق التي صدرت بشأن حقوق الإنسان، والضمانات التي توفرها الشريعة لهذه الحقوق.
2. الحرية بفروعها؛ الحرية السياسية بما في ذلك حرية الانتماء (الديمقراطية)، وحرية الترشيح وتولي الوظائف العامة، ثم الحريات الفردية.
3. حق حماية الأنفس والأعراض والأموال والأنساب.
4. الحق في العدل والمساواة بفروعهما.
5. أبرز التطبيقات للحقوق السابقة في الشريعة والقانون.

مركز التميز الأكاديمي:

http://quality.iugaza.edu.ps/E....xcellenceCenter/ar/D

قائمة محاضرات المساق:
http://www.youtube.com/playlis....t?list=PL9fwy3NUQKwZ

الجامعة الإسلامية غزة:
http://www.iugaza.edu.ps/ar
قناة مركز التميز الأكاديمي بالجامعة الإسلامية - غزة على YouTube :
http://www.youtube.com/iugaza1

تعريف الحق وتقسيماته  [المحاضرة: 1/13]
01:37:10
iugaza1
17 Views · 3 years ago

اسم المساق: حقوق الإنسان في الشريعة والقانون
اسم المحاضر: د. عاطف محمد أبو هربيد
الكلية: الشريعة والقانون
القسم: الشريعة الإسلامية
وصف المساق :
يدرس هذا المساق:
1. تعريف حقوق الإنسان وأنواعها، ولمحة تاريخية عن الوثائق التي صدرت بشأن حقوق الإنسان، والضمانات التي توفرها الشريعة لهذه الحقوق.
2. الحرية بفروعها؛ الحرية السياسية بما في ذلك حرية الانتماء (الديمقراطية)، وحرية الترشيح وتولي الوظائف العامة، ثم الحريات الفردية.
3. حق حماية الأنفس والأعراض والأموال والأنساب.
4. الحق في العدل والمساواة بفروعهما.
5. أبرز التطبيقات للحقوق السابقة في الشريعة والقانون.

مركز التميز الأكاديمي:

http://quality.iugaza.edu.ps/E....xcellenceCenter/ar/D

قائمة محاضرات المساق:
http://www.youtube.com/playlis....t?list=PL9fwy3NUQKwZ

الجامعة الإسلامية غزة:
http://www.iugaza.edu.ps/ar
قناة مركز التميز الأكاديمي بالجامعة الإسلامية - غزة على YouTube :
http://www.youtube.com/iugaza1

24. Samson Agonistes (cont.)
00:44:28
YaleCourses
15 Views · 3 years ago

Milton (ENGL 220)

In the final lecture of the course, the analysis of Samson Agonistes comes to a conclusion with an exploration of the poem's sexual imagery. Milton's choice of subject matter is puzzled over, as are the ethics of his tragic hero, particularly when compared to the heroes of Milton's previous epics. The poem is positioned as a means by which Milton ultimately resolves the poetic, religious, and career-related crises of his earlier poem, "The Passion," and the compelling relationship between the corpus and the poet's biography is revisited one final time.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction
02:07 - Chapter 2. Why Did Milton Choose Samson for the Subject of his Final Work?
35:32 - Chapter 3. Final Thoughts on Milton

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Fall 2007.

23. Samson Agonistes
00:44:04
YaleCourses
8 Views · 3 years ago

Milton (ENGL 220)

This introduction to Samson Agonistes focuses on a psycho-sexual reading of the poem, with particular emphasis placed on the poem's peculiar association of sexuality with violence. The characterization of Dalila and her similarity to Samson is discussed. The problems inherit in Miltonic heroism, especially self-sufficiency and the nature of heroic sacrifice, are expounded upon.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction: "Samson Agonistes"
01:57 - Chapter 2. When was "Samson Agonistes" Written?
17:14 - Chapter 3. "Samson Agonistes": The Most Intense Expression of Misogyny in the Miltonic Canon
25:38 - Chapter 4. Dalila's Dialogue
36:42 - Chapter 5. Samson: The Nursling of God

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Fall 2007.

22. Paradise Regained, Books III-IV
00:37:52
YaleCourses
18 Views · 3 years ago

Milton (ENGL 220)

In this second lecture on Paradise Regained, the three temptations are examined and Milton's unusual departure from their account in the Gospel of Luke is discussed. The poem's tacit assertion of the superiority of knowledge and ethics over action is probed. Considerable time is spent examining the Son's rejection of classical literature. Finally, Book Four's allusion to the riddle of the sphinx serves as a springboard to a consideration of the poem's Oedipal elements.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction: The Notion of Identity in Paradise Regained and "Paradise Lost"
03:48 - Chapter 2. Who is John Milton?
10:31 - Chapter 3. The Three Temptations of the Son of God by Satan
42:33 - Chapter 4. Oedipus and the Sphinx's Riddle

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Fall 2007.

21. Paradise Regained, Books I-II
00:49:46
YaleCourses
19 Views · 3 years ago

Milton (ENGL 220)

This lecture treats the first two books of the sequel to Paradise Lost, Paradise Reqained. The difference in style and subject matter is described. The poem's depiction of the Son of God and Satan, specifically the characters' seeming inability to recollect any of the events of Paradise Lost or the Bible, is closely analyzed. At the lecture's conclusion, similarities between the Son's slowly developing sense of his identity and Milton's own narrative of his poetic development are examined.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction: "Paradise Regained"
07:45 - Chapter 2. Adam's Misinterpretation of The Protoevangelium
21:55 - Chapter 3. Jesus is Baptized by John the Baptist
37:47 - Chapter 4. "Paradise Regained": A Negation and Renunciation of "Paradise Lost"

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Fall 2007.

20. Paradise Lost, Books XI-XII (cont.)
00:45:44
YaleCourses
11 Views · 3 years ago

Milton (ENGL 220)

In this final lecture on Paradise Lost, Book Twelve's justification for the expulsion of Adam and Eve from the garden is examined alongside the Genesis account. The nature of Milton's God, whether literal or liberal, is examined at length. The poem's closing lines are closely read, with substantial attention paid to Milton's final, complicated take on the poem-long consideration of Providence and free will.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction
04:37 - Chapter 2. "The Christian Doctrine": Milton's Theological Treatise
08:58 - Chapter 3. Milton, The Book of Genesis and the Expulsion of Adam and Eve
17:57 - Chapter 4. Milton's Conflicting Accounts of Key Moments in Christian History
31:45 - Chapter 5. God's Divine and Eternal Providence

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Fall 2007.

19. Paradise Lost, Books XI-XII
00:51:09
YaleCourses
16 Views · 3 years ago

Milton (ENGL 220)

Books Eleven and Twelve of Paradise Lost and their radical departure from the poem's previous style are discussed. The transformation of Milton's famously sonorous verse into a more didactic mode is closely documented, and the poem's increasing emphasis on visual instruction is underscored in a study of the Archangel Michael's lesson on the history of the post-fallen world. Considerable time is devoted to both a consideration of Milton's late politics and Book Eleven's depiction of the destruction of paradise.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction: The Last Two Books of "Paradise Lost"
09:00 - Chapter 2. Recap of the Treatise on Licensing
20:03 - Chapter 3. "Paradise Lost" Book XI: A Vision of Michael's History Lesson
38:16 - Chapter 4. "Paradise Lost" Book XII: A Narration of Michael's History Lesson

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Fall 2007.

18. Paradise Lost, Books IX-X
00:51:42
YaleCourses
13 Views · 3 years ago

Milton (ENGL 220)

This second lecture on the Fall traces Milton's use of the word wander, in all of its forms, across the poem. The transformation of wander from its pre-fallen sense to its more nefarious incarnation following the transgression is examined closely. The wider literary context of the concept of wandering, with particular emphasis placed on its importance to the romance genre, is briefly discussed. The reductive forces of Book Nine -- particularly its tendency to transform the moral ambivalence, disputed sexual hierarchy, and general poetic ambiguity of earlier books into more definitive representations -- are considered, with the lecture ultimately suggesting that the poem begins to turn away in Book Nine from many of its proto-feminist elements.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction: The Fall, Language and Literature
06:33 - Chapter 2. Milton's Motivations for writing about The Fall
14:41 - Chapter 3. Tracing the History of the Word "Wandering" as it Progresses through the Poem
31:31 - Chapter 4. A New Understanding of Eve
41:07 - Chapter 5. "Paradise Lost" Book X: The Consequences of The Fall

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Fall 2007.

17. Paradise Lost, Book IX
00:47:04
YaleCourses
14 Views · 3 years ago

Milton (ENGL 220)

Book Nine and the depiction of the Fall are presented. Adam and Eve's dialogue -- especially their perspectives on labor, temptation, and the nature of the garden -- is examined. Satan's strategic temptation of Eve is closely analyzed. At the lecture's conclusion, Adam and Eve's new fallen sight is discussed, with particular emphasis placed on the reference to the "veil" of pre-fallen innocence. Overall, the tension between doctrinal and subversive perspectives on the pre-fallen hierarchy of Eden is underscored.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction: "Paradise Lost" Book IX
03:01 - Chapter 2. Adam and Eve, Arguing?
10:19 - Chapter 3. The Argument between Adam and Eve on the Morning of the Fall
36:03 - Chapter 4. The Promise of Equality and its Importance to Eve after the Fall

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Fall 2007.

16. Paradise Lost, Books VII-VIII
00:46:15
YaleCourses
14 Views · 3 years ago

Milton (ENGL 220)

This lecture on Books Seven and Eight of Paradise Lost focuses on Milton's account of the Creation. The poet's persistent interest in the imagery of digestion is explored with help from the proto-scientific theories of the seventeenth-century philosopher Paracelsus. The moment at which Milton names and assigns a gender to his muse is examined. Finally, Milton's use of gender in the Creation account is explored in light of previous discussions of the poem's complex sexual hierarchy; particular emphasis is placed on Raphael's similarly gendered account of celestial hierarchy in Book Eight.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Milton's Theory of Monism
05:09 - Chapter 2. "Paradise Lost" Book VII: The Book of Creation
36:09 - Chapter 3. "Paradise Lost" Book VIII: Reasserting the Subordination of Woman to Man

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Fall 2007.

15. Paradise Lost, Books V-VI
00:52:35
YaleCourses
10 Views · 3 years ago

Milton (ENGL 220)

The description of human sexual hierarchy in Book Four of Paradise Lost is contrasted with the depiction of angelic hierarchy in Book Five. Both the Archangel Raphael's and Satan's accounts and theories of creation are examined. The poem's complex and vacillating endorsement of arbitrary decree, on the one hand, and egalitarian self-determination, on the other, is probed. The nature of matter and physical being in Heaven and Eden are explored with particular emphasis placed on the poem's monistic elements. Overall, Milton's willingness to question accepted religious, social, and political doctrine, even that which authorities in his own poem seem to express, is stressed.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Men vs. Women: The Coexistence of Freedom and Social Hierarchy in "Paradise Lost" Book IV
08:49 - Chapter 2. Angels vs. Humans: The Coexistence of Freedom and Social Hierarchy in "Paradise Lost" Book V
40:34 - Chapter 3. Satan's Discussion with Abdiel

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Fall 2007.

14. Paradise Lost, Book IV
00:51:43
YaleCourses
11 Views · 3 years ago

Milton (ENGL 220)

This lecture examines Book Four's depiction of Adam and Eve and the sexual politics of life in Eden. Seventeenth-century political theory, particularly the work of Thomas Hobbes, is considered with a focus on then-contemporary theories of the structure and government of the first human societies. Critical perspectives on what have variously been proposed as sexist and feminist elements of Milton's Eden are surveyed. Milton's struggle with the problem of depicting an unfallen world to a fallen audience is closely detailed. The lecture concludes with a study of Rembrandt's 1638 drawing, "Adam and Eve."

00:00 - Chapter 1. Dissimiles in "Paradise Lost": Fallen Representation of Unfallen-ness
10:16 - Chapter 2. Politics and Seventeenth-Century Descriptions of Adam and Eve
15:45 - Chapter 3. Milton's Political Philosophy
26:29 - Chapter 4. What Made Adam and Eve Unequal?

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Fall 2007.

13. Paradise Lost, Book III
00:48:53
YaleCourses
14 Views · 3 years ago

Milton (ENGL 220)

In this second lecture on Book Three of Paradise Lost, the dialogue between God and the Son in heaven is explored with particular attention paid to Milton's modification of the Calvinist theory of predestination. The terms and implications of Milton's attempt to justify the ways of God to man are considered. Milton's misgivings regarding the doctrine of the Trinity are examined, and the relationship between his theology and seventeenth-century political movements is expounded upon.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction: Milton's Vindication of God
09:55 - Chapter 2. The Faculty of Free Will
25:52 - Chapter 3. A Dialogue in Heaven between Father and Son

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Fall 2007.

12. The Blind Prophet
00:47:25
YaleCourses
22 Views · 3 years ago

Milton (ENGL 220)

This lecture focuses on the invocation to light at the beginning of Book Three of Paradise Lost. Milton's factual and figurative understanding of his blindness is traced through his letters, Sonnet XXII, and the later epic Samson Agonistes. Particular emphasis is placed on the transformation of blindness in the corpus from a spiritual punishment to a poetic gift. The implications of biographical interpretations of literature are also touched upon.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction: Milton's Blindness
04:47 - Chapter 2. How Milton and His Contemporaries Interpreted His Blindness
17:35 - Chapter 3. Light and the Creation Account: Comparing Milton and The Book of Genesis
39:09 - Chapter 4. Blindness Explored in Samson Agonistes

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Fall 2007.

11. The Miltonic Smile
00:45:40
YaleCourses
19 Views · 3 years ago

Milton (ENGL 220)

Milton's characteristic use of simile is explored in Books One and Two of Paradise Lost. Particular attention is paid to how Milton's similes work to support, undermine, and complicate both the depiction of Satan and the broader thematic concerns of the poem, such as the ideas of free will and divine providence. The critical perspectives of Geoffrey Hartman and Stanley Fish are incorporated into an analysis of Satan's shield and spear and the simile of the leaves.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction: Similes in "Paradise Lost"
03:36 - Chapter 2. Similes in "Paradise Lost": Satan's Shield Compared to the Moon
17:05 - Chapter 3. Similes in "Paradise Lost": Satan's Spear Compared to the Mast of a Ship
22:38 - Chapter 4. Similes in "Paradise Lost": Simile of the Leaves
34:18 - Chapter 5. Hartman and Fish: Theories of Similes in "Paradise Lost"
40:34 - Chapter 6. Similes in "Paradise Lost": Simile of the Belated Peasant

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Fall 2007.

10. God and Mammon: The Wealth of Literary Memory
00:50:38
YaleCourses
17 Views · 3 years ago

Milton (ENGL 220)

This second lecture on Paradise Lost looks at hell and its inhabitants, as depicted in Books I and II. Milton's struggle both to match and outdo his literary predecessors is examined by way of allusions to the works of Homer and Edmund Spenser, particularly the cave of Mammon episode in Book Two of The Faerie Queene. The presence of classical mythological figures, such as Medusa and Mulciber, in the Christian hell of Paradise Lost is pondered, along with early distinctions in the poem, frequently blurred, between good and evil, beautiful and ugly, and heaven and hell.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Was Memory the Source of Milton's Poetic Inspiration?
04:03 - Chapter 2. Milton Defends the Divine Authority behind his Poem
08:02 - Chapter 3. "Paradise Lost": A Literary Fantasy of Forgetfulness
16:22 - Chapter 4. The Cave of Mammon and the Theme of Temptation
24:36 - Chapter 5. Analyzing "Paradise Lost"

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Fall 2007.

9. Paradise Lost, Book I
00:51:20
YaleCourses
9 Views · 3 years ago

Milton (ENGL 220)

The invocation to Paradise Lost is read and analyzed. Milton's tenure as Latin Secretary under the Puritan government, his subsequent imprisonment upon the restoration of the monarchy, and his blindness are all briefly discussed. The poet's subsequent choice of a religious subject, rather than a nationalist one, for his epic is considered in light of the failure of the Puritan regime. His radical poetics, including his stance against rhyme and his unique use of enjambment and double syntax, is closely examined. Elements of the radical philosophy of monism, present in his depiction of angelic bodies, are identified and discussed at length.

00:00 - Chapter 1. "Paradise Lost": The Fall of Adam, Eve and the Rebel Angels
08:56 - Chapter 2. "Paradise Lost": A Powerful Defense against Lateness
13:44 - Chapter 3. "First": A Strategy of Retrospective Anticipation
23:14 - Chapter 4. "Paradise Lost": Radical Theology
28:25 - Chapter 5. "Paradise Lost": Thoughts Unconstrained by Grammar

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Fall 2007.

8. Areopagitica
00:46:36
YaleCourses
9 Views · 3 years ago

Milton (ENGL 220)

Milton's political tract Areopagitica is discussed at length. The author's complicated take on state censorship and licensing, both practiced by the English government with respect to printed materials at the time, is examined. His eclectic use of pagan mythology, Christian scripture, and the metaphors of eating and digestion in defense of his position are probed. Lastly, Milton's insistence that moral truths must be examined and tested in order for goodness to be known is explored as an early manifestation of the rhetoric that will be used to depict the Fall in Paradise Lost.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction: Areopagitica and the English Revolution
05:49 - Chapter 2. Parliamentary Factions During the English Revolution
10:28 - Chapter 3. "Areopagitica": Freedom of the Press, Censorship and Licensing
24:35 - Chapter 4. Milton's Narrative of the History of Truth

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Fall 2007.

7. Lycidas (cont.)
00:52:37
YaleCourses
13 Views · 3 years ago

Milton (ENGL 220)

In this second lecture on "Lycidas," moments of intrusion and revelation are closely examined. Saint Peter's protracted sermon is connected with the wider context of Puritan practices and controversies. The poem's tendency to suggest pairs and substitutions is duly noted. Finally, its conclusion is read as a triumphant moment in the young Milton's poetry, at which point he parts with the claims of ill-preparedness and little experience that dominated the early poems and assumes instead a prophetic voice for himself akin to Isaiah's.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction: Analyzing the Beginning of "Lycidas"
03:11 - Chapter 2. The Pastoral Framework of "Lycidas"
14:00 - Chapter 3. Milton: "The Reason of Church Government"
19:36 - Chapter 4. The Dramatic Structure of "Lycidas": A Succession of Four Mourners
48:50 - Chapter 5. Milton: The Prophetic Poet?

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Fall 2007.

6. Lycidas
00:51:52
YaleCourses
13 Views · 3 years ago

Milton (ENGL 220)

Milton's poem "Lycidas" is discussed as an example of pastoral elegy and one of Milton's first forays into theodicy. The poetic speaker's preoccupation with questions of immortality and reward, especially for poets and virgins, is probed. The Christian elements of the poem's dilemma are addressed, while the solution to the speaker's crisis is characterized as erotic and oddly paganistic, pointing towards the heterodox nature of much of Milton's thinking.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Revisiting Comus
07:04 - Chapter 2. "Lycidas": An Elegy
26:44 - Chapter 3. A Review of the Great Poet Orpheus
33:27 - Chapter 4. "Lycidas" and Milton's Letter to a Friend

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Fall 2007.

5. Poetry and Marriage
00:47:00
YaleCourses
15 Views · 3 years ago

Milton (ENGL 220)

This second lecture on Milton's masque probes its complex depictions of virginity and chastity. The version of the masque performed in 1634 is compared with the published version of 1637, with particular emphasis on a monologue on the vanquishing powers of virginity that is created for the latter. The poet's commonplace book, specifically his notes on the self-mutilation of the medieval nuns of Coldingham, is linked to images of the body in the masque. Milton's gradual revision of his initial position favoring life-long virginity is described in detail.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Milton on Virginity, Chastity and the Threat of Rape
11:14 - Chapter 2. A Note on Chastity
16:56 - Chapter 3. Comus and the Lady: The Tension between Virginity and Chastity

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Fall 2007.

4. Poetry and Virginity
00:51:09
YaleCourses
13 Views · 3 years ago

Milton (ENGL 220)

Milton's first publication, A Mask Presented at Ludlow Castle, is examined. Milton's vision of a poet's heaven in "Ad Patrem," paired with the letter to Charles Diodati, with its particular emphasis on the need for chastity in poets, is used as a springboard to a discussion of the depiction of sexual ideals in the masque. Revelation 14, 1 Corinthians, and the Apology for Smectymnuus are also discussed at length, as are the poet's biography and the history of the masque's title.

00:00 - Chapter 1. "Ad Patrem": A Poem to Milton's Father
08:33 - Chapter 2. "An Apology for Smectymnuus"
16:34 - Chapter 3. "Comus: A Mask Presented at Ludlow Castle"

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Fall 2007.

3. Credible Employment
00:50:01
YaleCourses
7 Views · 3 years ago

Milton (ENGL 220)

This lecture examines the role and meanings of the word vocation in Milton's life-long meditation on (and concern for) what it means to be chosen by God. Milton's profound anxiety in the years following his graduation from Cambridge regarding his poetic career and, more specifically, his status as a Christian poet selected by God for greatness is outlined.

1. Introduction: Milton, Power, and the Power of Milton
00:44:17
YaleCourses
3 Views · 3 years ago

Milton (ENGL 220)

An introduction to John Milton: man, poet, and legend. Milton's place at the center of the English literary canon is asserted, articulated, and examined through a discussion of Milton's long, complicated association with literary power. The conception of Miltonic power and its calculated use in political literature is analyzed in the feminist writings of Lady Mary Chudleigh, Mary Astell, and Virginia Woolf. Later the god-like qualities often ascribed to Miltonic authority are considered alongside Satan's excursus on the constructed nature of divine might in Paradise Lost, and the notorious character's method of analysis is shown to be a useful mode of encountering the author himself.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction: Milton's Power as a Poet
15:37 - Chapter 2. Lady Mary Chudleigh on Milton and the Priority of the Sexes
19:42 - Chapter 3. Mary Astell on Milton and the Priority of the Sexes
24:03 - Chapter 4. Virginia Woolf on Milton and the Priority of the Sexes
32:20 - Chapter 5. Milton, Power and the Revolution against God by Satan

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Fall 2007.

24. Asymmetric information: auctions and the winner's curse
01:02:29
YaleCourses
8 Views · 3 years ago

Game Theory (ECON 159)

We discuss auctions. We first distinguish two extremes: common values and private values. We hold a common value auction in class and discover the winner's curse, the winner tends to overpay. We discuss why this occurs and how to avoid it: you should bid as if you knew that your bid would win; that is, as if you knew your initial estimate of the common value was the highest. This leads you to bid much below your initial estimate. Then we discuss four forms of auction: first-price sealed-bid, second-price sealed-bid, open ascending, and open descending auctions. We discuss bidding strategies in each auction form for the case when values are private. Finally, we start to discuss which auction forms generate higher revenues for the seller, but a proper analysis of this will have to await the next course.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Auctions: Common versus Private Values
08:16 - Chapter 2. Auctions: Winner's Curse in the First-Price Sealed-Bid Auction
42:38 - Chapter 3. Auctions: Other Types of Auction
58:35 - Chapter 4. Auctions: Revenue Generation in Different Types of Auctions

Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu


This course was recorded in Fall 2007.

23.  Asymmetric information: silence, signaling and suffering education
01:10:37
YaleCourses
23 Views · 3 years ago

Game Theory (ECON 159)

We look at two settings with asymmetric information; one side of a game knows something that the other side does not. We should always interpret attempts to communicate or signal such information taking into account the incentives of the person doing the signaling. In the first setting, information is verifiable. Here, the failure explicitly to reveal information can be informative, and hence verifiable information tends to come out even when you don't want it to. We consider examples of such information unraveling. Then we move to unverifiable information. Here, it is hard to convey such information even if you want to. Nevertheless, differentially costly signals can sometimes provide incentives for agents with different information to distinguish themselves. In particular, we consider how the education system can allow future workers to signal their abilities. We discuss some implications of this rather pessimistic view of education.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Asymmetric Information: Signaling and Information Unraveling
16:48 - Chapter 2. Information Unraveling: Examples
35:07 - Chapter 3. Signaling: Good and Bad Workers
59:36 - Chapter 4. Signaling: Conclusions

Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu


This course was recorded in Fall 2007.

22. Repeated games: cheating, punishment, and outsourcing
01:15:47
YaleCourses
9 Views · 3 years ago

Game Theory (ECON 159)

In business or personal relationships, promises and threats of good and bad behavior tomorrow may provide good incentives for good behavior today, but, to work, these promises and threats must be credible. In particular, they must come from equilibrium behavior tomorrow, and hence form part of a subgame perfect equilibrium today. We find that the grim strategy forms such an equilibrium provided that we are patient and the game has a high probability of continuing. We discuss what this means for the personal relationships of seniors in the class. Then we discuss less draconian punishments, and find there is a trade off between the severity of punishments and the required probability that relationships will endure. We apply this idea to a moral-hazard problem that arises with outsourcing, and find that the high wage premiums found in foreign sectors of emerging markets may be reduced as these relationships become more stable.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Repeated Interaction: The Grim Trigger Strategy in the Prisoner's Dilemma (Continued)
29:21 - Chapter 2. The Grim Trigger Strategy: Generalization and Real World Examples
37:56 - Chapter 3. Cooperation in Repeated Interactions: The "One Period Punishment" Strategy
53:09 - Chapter 4. Cooperation in Repeated Interactions: Repeated Moral Hazard
01:13:53 - Chapter 5. Cooperation in Repeated Interactions: Conclusions

Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu


This course was recorded in Fall 2007.

21. Repeated games: cooperation vs. the end game
01:15:19
YaleCourses
13 Views · 3 years ago

Game Theory (ECON 159)

We discuss repeated games, aiming to unpack the intuition that the promise of rewards and the threat of punishment in the future of a relationship can provide incentives for good behavior today. In class, we play prisoners' dilemma twice and three times, but this fails to sustain cooperation. The problem is that, in the last stage, since there is then is future, there is no incentive to cooperate, and hence the incentives unravel from the back. We related this to the real-world problems of a lame duck leader and of maintaining incentives for those close to retirement. But it is possible to sustain good behavior in early stages of some repeated games (even if they are only played a few times) provided the stage games have two or more equilibria to be used as rewards and punishments. This may require us to play bad equilibria tomorrow. We relate this to the trade off between ex ante and ex post efficiency in the law. Finally, we play a game in which the players do not know when the game will end, and we start to consider strategies for this potentially infinitely repeated game.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Repeated Interaction: Cooperation versus Defection in the Prisoner's Dilemma
16:40 - Chapter 2. Repeated Interaction: The Breakdown of Cooperation and The Lame Duck Effect
22:44 - Chapter 3. Repeated Interaction: Renegotiation
48:31 - Chapter 4. Failure of Renegotiation: Bankruptcy Laws
53:17 - Chapter 5. Repeated Interaction: The Grim Trigger Strategy

Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu


This course was recorded in Fall 2007.

20. Subgame perfect equilibrium: wars of attrition
01:15:37
YaleCourses
7 Views · 3 years ago

Game Theory (ECON 159)

We first play and then analyze wars of attrition; the games that afflict trench warfare, strikes, and businesses in some competitive settings. We find long and damaging fights can occur in class in these games even when the prizes are small in relation to the accumulated costs. These could be caused by irrationality or by players' having other goals like pride or reputation. But we argue that long, costly fights should be expected in these games even if everyone is rational and has standard goals. We show this first in a two-period version of the game and then in a potentially infinite version. There are equilibria in which the game ends fast without a fight, but there are also equilibria that can involve long fights. The only good news is that, the longer the fight and the higher the cost of fighting, the lower is the probability of such a fight.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Wars of Attrition: The Rivalry Game
17:39 - Chapter 2. Wars of Attrition: Real World Examples
24:04 - Chapter 3. Wars of Attrition: Analysis
47:53 - Chapter 4. Wars of Attrition: Discussion of SPEs
01:06:54 - Chapter 5. Wars of Attrition: Generalization

Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu


This course was recorded in Fall 2007.

19. Subgame perfect equilibrium: matchmaking and strategic investments
01:17:09
YaleCourses
7 Views · 3 years ago

Game Theory (ECON 159)

We analyze three games using our new solution concept, subgame perfect equilibrium (SPE). The first game involves players' trusting that others will not make mistakes. It has three Nash equilibria but only one is consistent with backward induction. We show the other two Nash equilibria are not subgame perfect: each fails to induce Nash in a subgame. The second game involves a matchmaker sending a couple on a date. There are three Nash equilibria in the dating subgame. We construct three corresponding subgame perfect equilibria of the whole game by rolling back each of the equilibrium payoffs from the subgame. Finally, we analyze a game in which a firm has to decide whether to invest in a machine that will reduce its costs of production. We learn that the strategic effects of this decision--its effect on the choices of other competing firms--can be large, and if we ignore them we will make mistakes.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Sub-game Perfect Equilibria: Example
27:22 - Chapter 2. Sub-game Perfect Equilibria: Matchmaking
34:31 - Chapter 3. Matchmaking: SPEs of the Game
49:37 - Chapter 4. Sub-game Perfect Equilibria: Strategic Investments
01:13:15 - Chapter 5. Strategic Investments: Discussion

Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu


This course was recorded in Fall 2007.

18. Imperfect information: information sets and sub-game perfection
01:15:58
YaleCourses
19 Views · 3 years ago

Game Theory (ECON 159)

We consider games that have both simultaneous and sequential components, combining ideas from before and after the midterm. We represent what a player does not know within a game using an information set: a collection of nodes among which the player cannot distinguish. This lets us define games of imperfect information; and also lets us formally define subgames. We then extend our definition of a strategy to imperfect information games, and use this to construct the normal form (the payoff matrix) of such games. A key idea here is that it is information, not time per se, that matters. We show that not all Nash equilibria of such games are equally plausible: some are inconsistent with backward induction; some involve non-Nash behavior in some (unreached) subgames. To deal with this, we introduce a more refined equilibrium notion, called sub-game perfection.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Games of Imperfect Information: Information Sets
18:56 - Chapter 2. Games of Imperfect Information: Translating a Game from Matrix Form to Tree Form and Vice Versa
35:11 - Chapter 3. Games of Imperfect Information: Finding Nash Equilibria
49:59 - Chapter 4. Games of Imperfect Information: Sub-games
01:10:17 - Chapter 5. Games of Imperfect Information: Sub-game Perfect Equilibria

Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu


This course was recorded in Fall 2007.

17. Backward induction: ultimatums and bargaining
01:10:45
YaleCourses
14 Views · 3 years ago

Game Theory (ECON 159)

We develop a simple model of bargaining, starting from an ultimatum game (one person makes the other a take it or leave it offer), and building up to alternating offer bargaining (where players can make counter-offers). On the way, we introduce discounting: a dollar tomorrow is worth less than a dollar today. We learn that, if players are equally patient, if offers can be in rapid succession, and if each side knows how much the game is worth to the other side, then the first offer is for an equal split of the pie and this offer is accepted. But this result depends on those assumptions; for example, bargaining power may depend on wealth.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Ultimatum Games: Why Backward Induction Fails Here
14:15 - Chapter 2. Bargaining Games: Setup and Generalization
47:44 - Chapter 3. Bargaining Games: Summary of Proof of Generalization
54:29 - Chapter 4. Bargaining Games: Assumptions and Conclusions

Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu


This course was recorded in Fall 2007.

16. Backward induction: reputation and duels
01:15:41
YaleCourses
9 Views · 3 years ago

Game Theory (ECON 159)

In the first half of the lecture, we consider the chain-store paradox. We discuss how to build the idea of reputation into game theory; in particular, in setting like this where a threat or promise would otherwise not be credible. The key idea is that players may not be completely certain about other players' payoffs or even their rationality. In the second half of the lecture, we stage a duel, a game of pre-emption. The key strategic question in such games is when; in this case, when to fire. We use two ideas from earlier lectures, dominance and backward induction, to analyze the game. Finally we discuss two biases found in Americans: overconfidence and over-valuing being pro-active.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Establishing a Reputation: Selten's Chain Store Paradox
20:56 - Chapter 2. Establishing a Reputation: Discussion
25:18 - Chapter 3. Dueling: Game Setup
34:04 - Chapter 4. Dueling: Game Analysis
45:42 - Chapter 5. Dueling: Finding a Solution
01:11:24 - Chapter 6. Dueling: Generalization

Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu


This course was recorded in Fall 2007.

15. Backward induction: chess, strategies, and credible threats
01:12:39
YaleCourses
11 Views · 3 years ago

Game Theory (ECON 159)

We first discuss Zermelo's theorem: that games like tic-tac-toe or chess have a solution. That is, either there is a way for player 1 to force a win, or there is a way for player 1 to force a tie, or there is a way for player 2 to force a win. The proof is by induction. Then we formally define and informally discuss both perfect information and strategies in such games. This allows us to find Nash equilibria in sequential games. But we find that some Nash equilibria are inconsistent with backward induction. In particular, we discuss an example that involves a threat that is believed in an equilibrium but does not seem credible.

00:00 - Chapter 1. First and Second Mover Advantages: Zermelo's Theorem
10:17 - Chapter 2. Zermelo's Theorem: Proof
17:06 - Chapter 3. Zermelo's Theorem: Generalization
31:20 - Chapter 4. Zermelo's Theorem: Games of Induction
40:27 - Chapter 5. Games of Perfect Information: Definition
01:01:56 - Chapter 6. Games of Perfect Information: Economic Example

Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu


This course was recorded in Fall 2007.

14. Backward induction: commitment, spies, and first-mover advantages
01:07:07
YaleCourses
16 Views · 3 years ago

Game Theory (ECON 159)

We first apply our big idea--backward induction--to analyze quantity competition between firms when play is sequential, the Stackelberg model. We do this twice: first using intuition and then using calculus. We learn that this game has a first-mover advantage, and that it comes commitment and from information in the game rather than the timing per se. We notice that in some games having more information can hurt you if other players know you will have that information and hence alter their behavior. Finally, we show that, contrary to myth, many games do not have first-mover advantages.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Sequential Games: First Mover Advantage in the Stackelberg Model
38:13 - Chapter 2. First Mover Advantage: Commitment Strategy
49:25 - Chapter 3. First Mover Advantage: Why It Is Not Always an Advantage
55:53 - Chapter 4. First and Second Mover Advantage: NIM

Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu


This course was recorded in Fall 2007.

13. Sequential games: moral hazard, incentives, and hungry lions
01:10:33
YaleCourses
17 Views · 3 years ago

Game Theory (ECON 159)

We consider games in which players move sequentially rather than simultaneously, starting with a game involving a borrower and a lender. We analyze the game using "backward induction." The game features moral hazard: the borrower will not repay a large loan. We discuss possible remedies for this kind of problem. One remedy involves incentive design: writing contracts that give the borrower an incentive to repay. Another involves commitment strategies; in this case providing collateral. We consider other commitment strategies such as burning boats. But the key lesson of the day is the idea of backward induction.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Sequential Games: Backward Induction
17:57 - Chapter 2. Sequential Games: Moral Hazard
29:50 - Chapter 3. Sequential Games: Incentive Design
44:29 - Chapter 4. Sequential Games: Commitment Strategies
01:01:06 - Chapter 5. Sequential Games: Backward Induction Is Really Important

Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu


This course was recorded in Fall 2007.

12.  Evolutionary stability: social convention, aggression, and cycles
01:06:06
YaleCourses
5 Views · 3 years ago

Game Theory (ECON 159)

We apply the idea of evolutionary stability to consider the evolution of social conventions. Then we consider games that involve aggressive (Hawk) and passive (Dove) strategies, finding that sometimes, evolutionary populations are mixed. We discuss how such games can help us to predict how behavior might vary across settings. Finally, we consider a game in which there is no evolutionary stable population and discuss an example from nature.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Monomorphic and Polymorphic Populations Theory: Definition
30:50 - Chapter 2. Monomorphic and Polymorphic Populations Theory: Hawk vs. Dove
50:00 - Chapter 3. Monomorphic and Polymorphic Populations Theory: Discussion
55:39 - Chapter 4. Monomorphic and Polymorphic Populations Theory: Identification and Testability

Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu


This course was recorded in Fall 2007.

11. Evolutionary stability: cooperation, mutation, and equilibrium
01:12:07
YaleCourses
6 Views · 3 years ago

Game Theory (ECON 159)

We discuss evolution and game theory, and introduce the concept of evolutionary stability. We ask what kinds of strategies are evolutionarily stable, and how this idea from biology relates to concepts from economics like domination and Nash equilibrium. The informal argument relating these ideas toward at the end of his lecture contains a notation error [U(Ŝ,S') should be U(S',Ŝ)]. A more formal argument is provided in the supplemental notes.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Game Theory and Evolution: Evolutionarily Stable Strategies - Example
25:40 - Chapter 2. Game Theory and Evolution: Evolutionarily Stable Strategies - Discussion
30:42 - Chapter 3. Game Theory and Evolution: Evolutionarily Stable Strategies Are Always Nash Equilibria
42:32 - Chapter 4. Game Theory and Evolution: Nash Equilibria Are Not Always Evolutionarily Stable Strategies
01:03:00 - Chapter 5. Game Theory and Evolution: Evolutionarily Stable Strategies and Nash Equilibria - Discussion

Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu


This course was recorded in Fall 2007.

10. Mixed strategies in baseball, dating and paying your taxes
01:13:32
YaleCourses
8 Views · 3 years ago

Game Theory (ECON 159)

We develop three different interpretations of mixed strategies in various contexts: sport, anti-terrorism strategy, dating, paying taxes and auditing taxpayers. One interpretation is that people literally randomize over their choices. Another is that your mixed strategy represents my belief about what you might do. A third is that the mixed strategy represents the proportions of people playing each pure strategy. Then we discuss some implications of the mixed equilibrium in games; in particular, we look how the equilibrium changes in the tax-compliance/auditor game as we increase the penalty for cheating on your taxes.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Mixed Strategy Equilibria: Example (Continued)
12:49 - Chapter 2. Mixed Strategy Equilibria: Other Examples in Sports
23:41 - Chapter 3. Mixed Strategy Equilibria Interpretation 1: Literal Randomization
28:17 - Chapter 4. Mixed Strategy Equilibria Interpretation 2: Players' Beliefs about Each Other's Actions
47:04 - Chapter 5. Mixed Strategy Equilibria Interpretation 3: Prediction of Split on Two or More Courses of Action in a Large Population
59:52 - Chapter 6. Mixed Strategy Equilibria: Policy Applications

Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu


This course was recorded in Fall 2007.

9. Mixed strategies in theory and tennis
01:12:53
YaleCourses
4 Views · 3 years ago

Game Theory (ECON 159)

We continue our discussion of mixed strategies. First we discuss the payoff to a mixed strategy, pointing out that it must be a weighed average of the payoffs to the pure strategies used in the mix. We note a consequence of this: if a mixed strategy is a best response, then all the pure strategies in the mix must themselves be best responses and hence indifferent. We use this idea to find mixed-strategy Nash equilibria in a game within a game of tennis.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Mixed Strategies: Definition
06:02 - Chapter 2. Mixed Strategies: Examples
22:20 - Chapter 3. Mixed Strategies: Direct and Indirect Effects on the Nash Equilibrium
27:05 - Chapter 4. Mixed Strategies and the Nash Equilibrium: Example

Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu


This course was recorded in Fall 2007.

8. Nash equilibrium: location, segregation and randomization
01:13:50
YaleCourses
10 Views · 3 years ago

Game Theory (ECON 159)

We first complete our discussion of the candidate-voter model showing, in particular, that, in equilibrium, two candidates cannot be too far apart. Then we play and analyze Schelling's location game. We discuss how segregation can occur in society even if no one desires it. We also learn that seemingly irrelevant details of a model can matter. We consider randomizations first by a central authority (such as in a bussing policy), and then decentralized randomization by the individuals themselves, "mixed strategies." Finally, we look at rock, paper, scissors to see an example of a mixed-strategy equilibrium to a game.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Candidate - Voter Model
14:22 - Chapter 2. Location and Segregation: Why Outcomes Are Not Necessarily Preferences
46:01 - Chapter 3. Location and Segregation: Examples
52:10 - Chapter 4. Location and Segregation: Policy Implications
57:51 - Chapter 5. Location and Segregation: Central vs. Individual Randomization
01:00:51 - Chapter 6. Pure vs. Mixed Strategies: Rock, Paper, Scissors

Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu


This course was recorded in Fall 2007.

7. Nash equilibrium: shopping, standing and voting on a line
01:11:22
YaleCourses
10 Views · 3 years ago

Game Theory (ECON 159)

We first consider the alternative "Bertrand" model of imperfect competition between two firms in which the firms set prices rather than setting quantities. Then we consider a richer model in which firms still set prices but in which the goods they produce are not identical. We model the firms as stores that are on either end of a long road or line. Customers live along this line. Then we return to models of strategic politics in which it is voters that are spread along a line. This time, however, we do not allow candidates to choose positions: they can only choose whether or not to enter the election. We play this "candidate-voter game" in the class, and we start to analyze both as a lesson about the notion of equilibrium and a lesson about politics.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Bertrand Duopoly: Standard Model
28:18 - Chapter 2. Bertrand Duopoly: Product Differentiation
40:13 - Chapter 3. Perfect Competition Revisited: The Candidate Voter Model

Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu


This course was recorded in Fall 2007.

6. Nash equilibrium: dating and Cournot
01:12:06
YaleCourses
6 Views · 3 years ago

Game Theory (ECON 159)

We apply the notion of Nash Equilibrium, first, to some more coordination games; in particular, the Battle of the Sexes. Then we analyze the classic Cournot model of imperfect competition between firms. We consider the difficulties in colluding in such settings, and we discuss the welfare consequences of the Cournot equilibrium as compared to monopoly and perfect competition.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Coordination Games: Scope for Leadership and Strategic Complements
04:59 - Chapter 2. Coordination Games: The Battle of the Sexes
18:37 - Chapter 3. Cournot Duopoly: Math
53:28 - Chapter 4. Cournot Duopoly: Real World Examples

Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu


This course was recorded in Fall 2007.

5. Nash equilibrium: bad fashion and bank runs
01:09:14
YaleCourses
9 Views · 3 years ago

Game Theory (ECON 159)

We first define formally the new concept from last time: Nash equilibrium. Then we discuss why we might be interested in Nash equilibrium and how we might find Nash equilibrium in various games. As an example, we play a class investment game to illustrate that there can be many equilibria in social settings, and that societies can fail to coordinate at all or may coordinate on a bad equilibrium. We argue that coordination problems are common in the real world. Finally, we discuss why in such coordination problems--unlike in prisoners' dilemmas--simply communicating may be a remedy.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Nash Equilibrium: Definition
09:31 - Chapter 2. Nash Equilibrium: Examples
23:13 - Chapter 3. Nash Equilibrium: Relation to Dominance
31:53 - Chapter 4. Pareto Efficient Equilibria in Coordination Games: The Investment Game
53:11 - Chapter 5. Pareto Efficient Equilibria in Coordination Games: Other Examples

Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu


This course was recorded in Fall 2007.

4. Best responses in soccer and business partnerships
01:12:05
YaleCourses
16 Views · 3 years ago

Game Theory (ECON 159)

We continue the idea (from last time) of playing a best response to what we believe others will do. More particularly, we develop the idea that you should not play a strategy that is not a best response for any belief about others' choices. We use this idea to analyze taking a penalty kick in soccer. Then we use it to analyze a profit-sharing partnership. Toward the end, we introduce a new notion: Nash Equilibrium.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Best Response: Penalty Kicks in Soccer
15:14 - Chapter 2. Best Response: Issues with the Penalty Kick Model
24:06 - Chapter 3. Best Response: Formal Definition
29:59 - Chapter 4. Externalities and Inefficient Outcomes: The Partnership Game
01:07:23 - Chapter 5. Nash Equilibrium: Preview

Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu


This course was recorded in Fall 2007.

3. Iterative deletion and the median-voter theorem
01:01:20
YaleCourses
5 Views · 3 years ago

Game Theory (ECON 159)

We apply the main idea from last time, iterative deletion of dominated strategies, to analyze an election where candidates can choose their policy positions. We then consider how good is this classic model as a description of the real political process, and how we might build on it to improve it. Toward the end of the class, we introduce a new idea to get us beyond iterative deletion. We think about our beliefs about what the other player is going to do, and then ask what is the best strategy for us to choose given those beliefs?

00:00 - Chapter 1. Iterative Deletion of Dominated Strategies: The Median Voter Theorem
27:25 - Chapter 2. Iterative Deletion of Dominated Strategies: Problems with The Median Voter Theorem
35:07 - Chapter 3. Iterative Deletion of Dominated Strategies: Robustness of The Median Voter Theorem
39:11 - Chapter 4. Best Response

Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu


This course was recorded in Fall 2007.

2. Putting yourselves into other people's shoes
01:08:49
YaleCourses
11 Views · 3 years ago

Game Theory (ECON 159)

At the start of the lecture, we introduce the "formal ingredients" of a game: the players, their strategies and their payoffs. Then we return to the main lessons from last time: not playing a dominated strategy; and putting ourselves into others' shoes. We apply these first to defending the Roman Empire against Hannibal; and then to picking a number in the game from last time. We learn that, when you put yourself in someone else's shoes, you should consider not only their goals, but also how sophisticated are they (are they rational?), and how much do they know about you (do they know that you are rational?). We introduce a new idea: the iterative deletion of dominated strategies. Finally, we discuss the difference between something being known and it being commonly known.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Recap of Previous Lecture: Prisoners' Dilemma and Payoffs
06:47 - Chapter 2. The Formal Ingredients of a Game
16:01 - Chapter 3. Weakly Dominant Strategies
35:29 - Chapter 4. Rationality and Common Knowledge
01:05:37 - Chapter 5. Common Knowledge vs. Mutual Knowledge

Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu


This course was recorded in Fall 2007.

1. Introduction: five first lessons
01:08:33
YaleCourses
12 Views · 3 years ago

Game Theory (ECON 159)

We introduce Game Theory by playing a game. We organize the game into players, their strategies, and their goals or payoffs; and we learn that we should decide what our goals are before we make choices. With some plausible payoffs, our game is a prisoners' dilemma. We learn that we should never choose a dominated strategy; but that rational play by rational players can lead to bad outcomes. We discuss some prisoners' dilemmas in the real world and some possible real-world remedies. With other plausible payoffs, our game is a coordination problem and has very different outcomes: so different payoffs matter. We often need to think, not only about our own payoffs, but also others' payoffs. We should put ourselves in others' shoes and try to predict what they will do. This is the essence of strategic thinking.

00:00 - Chapter 1. What Is Strategy?
02:16 - Chapter 2. Strategy: Where Does It Apply?
02:54 - Chapter 3. (Administrative Issues)
09:40 - Chapter 4. Elements of a Game: Strategies, Actions, Outcomes and Payoffs
21:38 - Chapter 5. Strictly Dominant versus Strictly Dominated Strategies
29:33 - Chapter 6. Contracts and Collusion
33:35 - Chapter 7. The Failure of Collusion and Inefficient Outcomes: Prisoner's Dilemma
41:40 - Chapter 8. Coordination Problems
01:07:53 - Chapter 9. Lesson Recap

Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu


This course was recorded in Fall 2007.

24. General Review
01:13:49
YaleCourses
12 Views · 3 years ago

Dante in Translation (ITAL 310)

The last class of the semester consists of a brief recapitulation of topics in the Divine Comedy addressed throughout the course, followed by an extensive question and answer session with the students. The questions posed allow Professor Mazzotta to elaborate on issues raised over the course of the semester, from Dante's place within the medieval love tradition to the relationship between his roles as poet and theologian.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Distinctive Theological Concerns in the "Divine Comedy"
12:05 - Chapter 2. Three Elements of Dante's Theology
22:12 - Chapter 3. The Question of Language
29:01 - Chapter 4. Question and Answer on Desire, the Papacy
46:54 - Chapter 5. Question and Answer on Hermeneutics, Other Religions, Violence
01:04:33 - Chapter 6. Question and Answer on Violence, Dante as Saint and Poet

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Fall 2008.

23. Paradise XXX, XXXI, XXXII, XXXIII
01:08:03
YaleCourses
46 Views · 3 years ago

Dante in Translation (ITAL 310)

Professor Mazzotta lectures on the final cantos of Paradise (XXX-XXXIII). The pilgrim's journey through the physical world comes to an end with his ascent into the Empyrean, a heaven of pure light beyond time and space. Beatrice welcomes Dante into the Heavenly Jerusalem, where the elect are assembled in a celestial rose. By describing the Empyrean as both a garden and a city, Dante recalls the poles of his own pilgrimage while dissolving the classical divide between urbs and rus, between civic life and pastoral retreat. Beatrice's invective against the enemies of empire from the spiritual realm of the celestial rose attests to the strength of Dante's political vision throughout his journey into God. Dante's concern with the harmony of oppositions as he approaches the beatific vision is crystallized in the prayer to the Virgin Mary offered by St. Bernard, Dante's third and final guide. In his account of the vision that follows, the end of Dante's pilgrimage and the measure of its success converge in the poet's admission of defeat in describing the face of God.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Into the Empyrean
05:21 - Chapter 2. Canto XXX: Heavenly Jerusalem; Theatre and Imagination; Simon Magus
19:06 - Chapter 3. Canto XXXI: Farewell to Beatrice
28:16 - Chapter 4. Canto XXXIII: The Final Vision; The Journey and Its Telling
01:00:31- Chapter 5. Question and Answer

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Fall 2008.

22. Paradise XXVII, XXVIII, XXIX
01:14:11
YaleCourses
34 Views · 3 years ago

Dante in Translation (ITAL 310)

This lecture focuses on Paradise XXVII-XXIX. St. Peter's invective against the papacy from the Heaven of the Fixed Stars is juxtaposed with Dante's portrayal of its contemporary incumbent, Boniface VIII, in the corresponding canto of Inferno. Recalls of infernal characters proliferate as the pilgrim ascends with Beatrice into the primum mobile. Bid to look back on the world below, Dante perceives the mad track of his uneasy archetype, Ulysses. Dante's remembrance of this tragic shipwreck at the very boundary of time and space gains interest in light of his allusion to Francesca at the outset of Paradise XXIX. These resonances of intellectual and erotic transgression reinforce the convergence of cosmology and creation Dante assigns to the heaven of metaphysics.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Canto XXVII: St. Peter and the Boundary of the Material Universe
20:12 - Chapter 2. Canto XXVIII: The Order of Angels
24:04 - Chapter 3. Shift to the Order of Creation in Canto XXIX
37:43 - Chapter 4. Question and Answer on Creation, Incarnation
01:00:56 - Chapter 5. Question and Answer on Sexual Language, Theological Risk

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Fall 2008.

21. Paradise XXIV, XXV, XXVI
01:16:16
YaleCourses
375 Views · 3 years ago

Dante in Translation (ITAL 310)

This lecture covers Paradise XXIV-XXVI. In the Heaven of the Fixed Stars, Dante is examined on the three theological virtues by the apostles associated with each: St. Peter with faith (Paradise XXIV), St. James with hope (Paradise XXV), and St. John with love (Paradise XXVI). While mastering these virtues is irrelevant to the elect, it is crucial to the message of reform the pilgrim-turned-poet will relay on his return home. Dante's scholastic profession of faith before St. Peter (Paradise XXIV) is read testament to the complication of faith and reason. The second of the theological virtues is discussed in light of the classical disparagement of hope as a form of self-deception and its redemption by the biblical tradition through the story of Exodus, the archetype of Dante's journey. The pilgrim's three-part examination continues in Paradise XXVI under the auspices of St. John, where love, the greatest of the virtues is distinguished by its elusiveness. The emphasis on love's resistance to formal definition sets the stage for the pilgrim's encounter with Adam, who sheds light on the linguistic consequences of the Fall.

00:00 - Chapter 1. An Introduction to the Three Theoretical Virtues
07:59 - Chapter 2. The Virtue of Faith
28:22 - Chapter 3. The Virtue of Hope
44:40 - Chapter 4. The Virtue of Love
56:08 - Chapter 5. Question and Answer

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Fall 2008.

20. Paradise XVIII, XIX, XXI, XXII
01:15:40
YaleCourses
22 Views · 3 years ago

Dante in Translation (ITAL 310)

In this lecture, Professor Mazzotta examines Paradise XVIII-XIX and XXI-XXII. In Paradise XVIII, Dante enters the Heaven of Jupiter, where the souls of righteous rulers assume the form of an eagle, the emblem of the Roman Empire. The Eagle's outcry against the wickedness of Christian kings leads Dante to probe the boundaries of divine justice by looking beyond the confines of Christian Europe. By contrasting the political with the moral boundaries that distinguish one culture from another, Dante opens up the Christian economy of redemption to medieval notions of alterity. In Paradise XXI, Dante moves from the exemplars of the active life to the contemplative spirits of the Heaven of Saturn, Peter Damian and St. Benedict. The question of perspective through which the theme of justice was explored resurfaces to distinguish between the visionary claims of the contemplative and mystical traditions. As Dante ascends to the Heaven of the Fixed Stars, catching sight of the earth below (Paradise XXII), his own visionary claims are distinguished by an awareness of his place in history.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Continuity and Thematic Expansion in the Cantos
10:35 - Chapter 2. Space, Place and Justice
26:49 - Chapter 3. A Conversation between Philosophy and Theology
42:49 - Chapter 4. The Contemplatives
01:02:30 - Chapter 5. Question and Answer

19. Paradise XV, XVI, XVII
01:11:09
YaleCourses
11 Views · 3 years ago

Dante in Translation (ITAL 310)

This lecture focuses on the cantos of Cacciaguida (Paradise XV-XVII). The pilgrim's encounter with his great-great grandfather brings to the fore the relationship between history, self and exile. Through his ancestor's mythology of their native Florence, Dante is shown to move from one historiographic mode to another, from the grandeur of epic to the localism of medieval chronicles. Underlying both is the understanding of history in terms of genealogy reinforced and reproved by Dante's mythic references to fathers and sons, from Aeneas and Anchises to Phaeton and Apollo to Hippolytus and Theseus. The classical and medieval idea of the self's relation to history in terms of the spatial continuity these genealogies provide is unsettled by Cacciaguida's prophecy of Dante's exile. The very premise of the poem's composition, exile is redeemed as an alternative means of reentering the world of history.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Canto XV, XVI and XVII: Self and History
07:39 - Chapter 2. Mythic Figures and the Exilic Self
25:14 - Chapter 3. Different Mode of Historiography
37:08 - Chapter 4. Language
57:58 - Chapter 5. Question and Answer

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Fall 2008.

18. Paradise XI, XII
01:13:12
YaleCourses
24 Views · 3 years ago

Dante in Translation (ITAL 310)

Professor Mazzotta continues his discussion of the Heaven of the Sun (Paradise X-IV), where the earthly disputes between the Franciscan and Dominican orders give way to mutual praise. The tribute St. Thomas pays to the founder of the Franciscan order (Paradise XI) is repaid by St. Bonaventure through his homage to St. Dominic (Paradise XII). The chiasmic structure of these cantos is reinforced by the presence of Nathan and Joachim of Flora, the counterweights to Solomon and Siger, among the second ring of sages. Special attention is then paid to the lives St. Francis and St. Dominic presented in Paradise XI and XII, where the former's marriage to Lady Poverty finds its poetic counterpart in the latter's marriage to theology. The critique of the world and its values shared by these religious founders is explored in light of the "ludic theology" that pervades these cantos.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Additional Remarks on Canto X
04:53 - Chapter 2. Franciscan and Dominican Saints
21:40 - Chapter 3. Canto XI: Counterpoints; Orientation
30:39 - Chapter 4. The Life of Francis
50:17 - Chapter 5. Canto XII: Life of Dominic
01:01:24 - Chapter 6. Question and Answer

17. Paradise IV, VI, X
01:15:49
YaleCourses
9 Views · 3 years ago

Dante in Translation (ITAL 310)

This lecture deals with Paradise IV, VI and X. At the beginning of Paradise IV, the pilgrim raises two questions to which the remainder of the canto is devoted. The first concerns Piccarda (Paradise III) who was constrained to break her religious vows. The second concerns the arrangement of the souls within the stars. The common thread that emerges from Beatrice's reply is the relationship between intellect and will. Just as Piccarda's fate reveals the limitations of the will, the representation of the souls in Paradise, a condescension to the pilgrim's human faculty, as Beatrice explains, reveal the limitations of the intellect. By dramatizing the limitations of both faculties, Dante underscores their interdependence. In Paradise VI, Dante turns his attention to politics. Through the emperor Justinian's account of Roman history, Dante places the antithetical views of Virgil and Augustine in conversation. Key to understanding Dante's position between these two extremes is the vituperation of contemporary civil strife that follows Justinian's encomium of the Empire. In Paradise X, the pilgrim enters the Heaven of the Sun, where St. Thomas and St. Bonaventure introduce him to two rings of spirits celebrated for their wisdom. The unlikely presence of Solomon and Siger of Brabant among the first of these concentric rings is discussed as a poetic reflection on the boundaries between knowledge and revelation.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Canto IV of "Paradise": The Nature of the Will and Representation of the Souls
09:31 - Chapter 2. The Need for Allegorical Representation
19:01 - Chapter 3. Canto VI: The Heaven of Dialectics; Emperor Justinian
41:39 - Chapter 4. Canto X: Solar Theology
49:36 - Chapter 5. St. Thomas and Others in Canto X
56:02 - Chapter 6. Metaphors in Canto X
01:02:49 - Chapter 7. Themes in Cantos IV, VI and X
01:09:27 - Chapter 8. Question and Answer

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Fall 2008.

16. Paradise I, II
01:15:10
YaleCourses
10 Views · 3 years ago

Dante in Translation (ITAL 310)

Professor Mazzotta introduces students to Paradise. The Ptolemaic structure of Dante's cosmos is described along with the arts and sciences associated with its spheres. Beatrice's role as teacher in Dante's cosmological journey is distinguished from that of her successor, St. Bernard of Clairvaux. An introduction to Dante's third and final guide to the Beatific Vision helps situate the poetics of Paradise vis-à-vis the mystical tradition. Professor Mazzotta's introduction to the canticle is followed by a close reading of the first canto. The end of the pilgrim's journey is discussed in light of the two theological modes Dante pulls together in the exordium of Paradise I. The poetic journey staged in the opening tercets is then explored in light of the mythological and Christian figures (Marsyas, St. Paul) Dante claims as his poetic precursors.

00:00 - Chapter 1. An Introduction to "Paradise"
11:06 - Chapter 2. Canto I: The Glory; Light and Motion; Principle of Hierarchy
18:28 - Chapter 3. Subjectivity; Desire
22:56 - Chapter 4. Apollo, God of Poets
32:16 - Chapter 5. Dante's Introductory Letter to "Paradise"
39:20 - Chapter 6. Traveling at the Speed of Light; Refining the Picture of the Universe
55:36 - Chapter 7. Canto II: An Invitation to Stay Close; Jason
01:03:21 - Chapter 8. Question and Answer

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Fall 2008.

15. Purgatory XXX, XXXI, XXXIII
01:08:41
YaleCourses
68 Views · 3 years ago

Dante in Translation (ITAL 310)

This lecture deals with Dante's representation of the Earthly Paradise at the summit of Mount Purgatory. The quest for freedom begun under the aegis of Cato in Purgatory I reaches its denouement at the threshold of Eden, where Virgil proclaims the freedom of the pilgrim's will (Purgatory XXVII). Left with pleasure as his guide, the pilgrim nevertheless falls short of a second Adam in his encounter with Matelda. His lingering susceptibility to earthly delights is underscored at the arrival of Beatrice (Purgatory XXX) whose harsh treatment of the pilgrim is read as a retrospective gloss on the dream of the Siren in Purgatory XIX. By dramatizing his character's failings within the Earthly Paradise, Dante replaces the paradigm of conversion as a once-for-all event with that of an ongoing process to be continued in Paradise under the guidance of Beatrice.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Virgil's Last Words
11:03 - Chapter 2. Cantos XXVIII to XXXIII: Pastoral Oasis Segment
25:52 - Chapter 3. Canto XXX: Beatrice Arrives
38:43 - Chapter 4. Canto XXXI: The Confession
46:47 - Chapter 5. Canto XXXIII: The End of "Purgatory"
01:01:05 - Chapter 6. Question and Answer

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Fall 2008.

14. Purgatory XXIV, XXV, XXVI
00:53:21
YaleCourses
1,042 Views · 3 years ago

Dante in Translation (ITAL 310)

Guest lecturer Professor David Lummus discusses Purgatory XXIV-XXVI. On the terraces of gluttony and lust, the pilgrim's encounters with masters of the Italian love lyric give rise to the Comedy's most sustained treatment of poetics. Through Dante's older contemporary Bonagiunta (Purgatory XXIV), the pilgrim distinguishes the poetic style of his youth from that of the courtly love tradition pursued by his interlocutor. In Purgatory XXVI, Dante reinforces his own poetic genealogy through his encounter with Guido Guinizelli, founder of the Sweet New Style of poetry he crafted in his youth. The interpretative key to the language of paternity and filiation that pervades these cantos is found in Purgatory XXV, where Statius' embryological exposition of the divine creation of the soul conveys the divinity of poetic inspiration.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Additional Remarks about the Relationship between Statius and Virgil
02:03 - Chapter 2. The Relationship between Poetry and Gluttony
08:49 - Chapter 3. Bonagiunta da Lucca
34:52 - Chapter 4. Poetic Identity
45:51 - Chapter 5. Question and Answer

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Fall 2008.

13. Purgatory XIX, XXI, XXII
01:19:04
YaleCourses
43 Views · 3 years ago

Dante in Translation (ITAL 310)

This lecture deals primarily with Purgatory XIX, XXI and XXII. The ambiguity of the imagination discussed in the preceding lecture as the selfsame path to intellectual discovery and disengagement is explored in expressly poetic terms. While the pilgrim's dream of the siren in Purgatory XIX warns of the death-dealing power of aesthetics, the encounter between Statius and Virgil in the cantos that follow points to its life-giving potential by casting poetry as a means of conversion.

00:00 - Chapter 1. The Issue of Imagination
16:23 - Chapter 2. The Dream of Canto XIX; The Two Women
40:29 - Chapter 3. Cantos XXI and XXII: Statius's Moral Conversion
01:09:30 - Chapter 4. Question and Answer

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Fall 2008.

12. Purgatory X, XI, XII, XVI, XVII
01:11:41
YaleCourses
72 Views · 3 years ago

Dante in Translation (ITAL 310)

In this lecture, Professor Mazzotta moves from the terrace of pride (Purgatory X-XII) to the terrace of wrath (Purgatory XVI-XVII). The relationship between art and pride, introduced in the previous lecture in the context of Canto X, is pursued along theological lines in the cantos immediately following. The "ludic theology" Dante embraces in these cantos resurfaces on the terrace of wrath, where Marco Lombardo's speech on the traditional problem of divine foreknowledge and human freedom highlights the playfulness of God's creation. The motifs of human and divine creation explored thus far are shown to converge at the numerical center of the poem (Purgatory XVII) in Dante's apostrophe to the imagination.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Cantos X, XI and XII: Virtues and Vices
06:51 - Chapter 2. Aesthetic Education
15:44 - Chapter 3. Canto XI: Reversal of Perspective
21:54 - Chapter 4. Canto XII: Punished Pride
28:11 - Chapter 5. Canto XVI: Marco Lombardo: Political and Legal Arguments
40:09 - Chapter 6. Canto XVII: Visions of Anger; Approaching the Center
51:25 - Chapter 7. Question and Answer

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Fall 2008.

11. Purgatory V, VI, IX, X
01:17:06
YaleCourses
17 Views · 3 years ago

Dante in Translation (ITAL 310)

This lecture covers Purgatory V, VI, IX and X. The purgatorial theme of freedom introduced in the previous lecture is revisited in the context of Canto V, where Buonconte da Montefeltro's appearance among the last minute penitents is read as a critique of the genealogical bonds of natural necessity. The poet passes from natural to civic ancestry in Purgatory VI, where the mutual affection of Virgil and Sordello, a former citizen of the classical poet's native Mantua, sparks an invective against the mutual enmity that enslaves contemporary Italy. The transition from ante-Purgatory to Purgatory proper in Canto IX leads to an elaboration on the moral and poetic structure of Purgatory, exemplified on the terrace of pride in Canto X.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Tension between the Old and the New: Moral Purification
04:54 - Chapter 2. Canto V: Retrospective Knowledge; Buonconte da Montefeltro; Pia de' Tolomei
15:22 - Chapter 3. Canto VI: The Political Canto
35:22 - Chapter 4. Marking the Rupture in Canto IX
40:08 - Chapter 5. Canto X: The World of Art; The Idea of Measurement
48:57 - Chapter 6. Learning How to Look; More on Measurement
01:10:04 - Chapter 7. Question and Answer

10. Purgatory I, II
01:10:59
YaleCourses
35 Views · 3 years ago

Dante in Translation (ITAL 310)

In this lecture, Professor Mazzotta introduces Purgatory and proceeds with a close reading of Cantos I and II. The topography of Mount Purgatory is described, and the moral system it structures is contrasted with that of Hell. Dante's paradoxical choice of Cato, a pagan suicide, as guardian to the entrance of Purgatory ushers in a discussion of freedom from the standpoint of classical antiquity, on the one hand, and Judaism, on the other. In his refusal to be enslaved by the past, both on earth and in the afterlife, Cato is seen to embody the virtues of exile, setting an example for the penitent souls of Ante-purgatory (Purgatory II), including the pilgrim, who still clings to the comforts of the past.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Purgatory as an Idea and as a Poetic Construction
07:34 - Chapter 2. Canto I: A New Departure
16:35 - Chapter 3. The Muses: Tonality and Orientation
23:27 - Chapter 4. Cato
30:14 - Chapter 5. Suicide; Purgatory as the Domain of Freedom
40:42 - Chapter 6. Canto II: Purgatory as the Antipodes of Jerusalem: Exodus
49:46 - Chapter 7. Internalizing the Narrative; The Exilic Condition; Casella
01:00:29 - Chapter 8. Question and Answer

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Fall 2008.

9. Inferno XXX, XXXI, XXXII, XXXIII, XXXIV
01:16:49
YaleCourses
73 Views · 3 years ago

Dante in Translation (ITAL 310)

The final cantos of Inferno are read with a view to the role of the tragic within Dante's Comedy. Using Dante's discussion of tragedy in the De vulgari eloquentia as a point of departure, Professor Mazzotta traces the disintegration of language that accompanies the pilgrim's descent into the pit of Hell, the zone of treachery, from the distorted speech of Nimrod in Inferno XXXI to the silence of Satan in Inferno XXXIV. The ultimate triumph of comedy over tragedy is dramatized by the pilgrim's ascent, by means of Lucifer, onto the shores of Mount Purgatory.

00:00 - Chapter 1. The Mode of the Tragic
05:19 - Chapter 2. "De vulgari eloquentia"
19:45 - Chapter 3. Canto XXX: Juno, Myrrha, Sinon
22:47 - Chapter 4. Canto XXXI: The Giants; Theory of Perspective
35:10 - Chapter 5. Canto XXXII: More on the Question of Perspective; Tragic Representation
59:27 - Chapter 6. Canto XXXIV: Satan
01:01:03 - Chapter 7. Canto XXXIII: Inventing the Poetic Myth of Purgatory
01:03:46 - Chapter 8. Question and Answer

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Fall 2008.

8. Inferno XXVI, XXVII, XXVIII
01:07:55
YaleCourses
514 Views · 3 years ago

Dante in Translation (ITAL 310)

Professor Mazzotta begins this lecture by recapitulating the ambivalent nature of Ulysses' sin and its relevance to Dante's poetic project. Inferno XXVII is then read in conjunction with the preceding canto. The antithetical relationship between Dante's false counselors, Ulysses and Guido da Montefeltro, anchors an overarching discussion of the relationship between rhetoric and politics. The latter half of the lecture is devoted to Inferno XXVIII, where Dante's preeminent sower of discord, Bertran de Born, introduces the principle of the contrapasso. The law of retribution that governs Dante's Inferno is discussed in light of classical and contemporary theories of justice/crime and punishment. In conclusion, the opening of Inferno XXIX is read as a retrospective gloss on the limitations of retributive justice.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Returning to Canto XXVI and Ulysses's Sin
11:14 - Chapter 2. Canto XXVII: Counter Myth to the Story of Ulysses
28:47 - Chapter 3. Canto XXVIII: Bertan de Born among the Makers of Discord
46:29 - Chapter 4. A Poet of Justice
57:00 - Chapter 5. Question and Answer

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Fall 2008.

7. Inferno XIX, XXI, XXV, XXVI
01:11:16
YaleCourses
2,469 Views · 3 years ago

Dante in Translation (ITAL 310)

This lecture deals primarily with Cantos XIX and XXVI of Inferno. Simony, the sin punished in Inferno XIX, is situated historically to point out the contiguity of the sacred and the profane and its relevance to the prophetic voice Dante established in this canto. The fine line between prophecy and profanation is shown to resurface in Inferno XXIV and XXV, where the poet falls prey, as did the pilgrim in Inferno IV, to poetic hubris. Once again, the dangers of Dante's poetic vocation are dramatized in the canto that immediately follows. In Inferno XXVI, Dante's tragic revision of the journey of Ulysses is shown to offset his own poetic enterprise, while acknowledging its risks.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Returning to Canto XV and Brunetto Latini
06:58 - Chapter 2. The Prophetic Voice and the Writer of Epistles
12:12 - Chapter 3. Canto XIX: Simony, Sacrilege and the Sacred
32:24 - Chapter 4. Short Remarks about Comedy and the Fall
33:56 - Chapter 5. Canto XV: Reenacting the Aesthetic Temptation
38:50 - Chapter 6. Canto XXVI: Ulysses as a Mode of Being for Dante
01:02:31 - Chapter 7. Question and Answer

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Fall 2008.

6. Inferno XII, XIII, XV, XVI
01:14:44
YaleCourses
60 Views · 3 years ago

Dante in Translation (ITAL 310)

This lecture focuses on the middle zone of Inferno, the area of violence (Inferno XII-XVI). Introductory remarks are made on the concentration of hybrid creatures in this area of Hell and followed by a close reading of cantos XIII and XV. The pilgrim's encounter with Pier delle Vigne (Inferno XIII) is placed in literary context (Aeneid III). The questioning of authority staged in this scene resurfaces in the circle of sodomy (Inferno XV), where the pilgrim's encounter with his teacher, Brunetto Latini, is read as a critique of the humanistic values he embodied.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Canto XII-XI: The Middle Ground and Its Presiding Figures
05:22 - Chapter 2. Canto XIII: The Suicides
20:49 - Chapter 3. Pier delle Vigne
33:41 - Chapter 4. Canto XV: Brunetto Latini; Dante's Understanding of Sodomy
57:07 - Chapter 5. Canto XI: The Figure of Geryon
01:03:05 - Chapter 6. Question and Answer

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Fall 2008.

5. Inferno IX, X, XI
01:17:43
YaleCourses
65 Views · 3 years ago

Dante in Translation (ITAL 310)

In this lecture, Professor Mazzotta discusses Inferno IX-XI. An impasse at the entrance to the City of Dis marks Virgil's first failure in his role as guide (Inferno IX). The invocation of Medusa by the harpies that descend while they wait for divine aid elicits Dante's first address to the reader. The question of literary mediation, posed in the previous lecture in the context of Inferno V, is explored further, and the distinction Dante draws between the "allegory of poets" and the "allegory of theologians" is introduced. Inferno X is read with a view to the uniqueness of the sin it deals with - heresy. The philosophical errors of the shades encountered here, Farinata and Cavalcante, are tied to the political turmoil they prophecy for Florence. From the disorder of the earthly city, Dante moves on to the order on its infernal counterpart, mapped by Virgil in Inferno XI. The moral system of Dante's Hell is then discussed with a view to its classical antecedents.

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Fall 2008.

4. Inferno V, VI, VII
01:11:04
YaleCourses
39 Views · 3 years ago

Dante in Translation (ITAL 310)

This lecture examines Inferno IV -VII. Dante's Limbo, modeled on the classical locus amoenus, is identified as a place of repose and vulnerability. Here, in fact, among the poets of antiquity, the pilgrim falls prey to poetic hubris by joining in their ranks. The pilgrim is faced with the consequences of his poetic vocation when he descends to the circle of lust (Inferno V), where Francesca da Rimini, in her failure to distinguish romance from reality, testifies to the dangers inherent to the act of reading. From the destructive power of lust within the private world of the court, Dante moves on to the effects of its sister sin, gluttony, on the public sphere of the city. The relationship posited in Inferno VI between Ciacco and his native Florence is read as a critique of the "body politic." In conclusion, Virgil's discourse on Fortune in the circle of avarice and prodigality (Inferno VII) is situated within the Christian world of divine providence.

00:00 - Chapter 1. The Ambiguities of Gardens
04:10 - Chapter 2. Canto V: The Second Circle
13:14 - Chapter 3. The Lustful in the Second Circle
19:40 - Chapter 4. Overwhelmed by Pity, Dante Faints Like a Dead Body
32:34 - Chapter 5. A Story of Reading; References to Time
40:29 - Chapter 6. Canto VI: The Third Circle; Ciacco
57:47 - Chapter 7. Dante's Political Understanding
01:03:05 - Chapter 8. Canto VII: The Avaricious in the Fourth Circle
01:08:17 - Chapter 9. Question and Answer

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Fall 2008.

3. Inferno I, II, III, IV
01:15:07
YaleCourses
62 Views · 3 years ago

Dante in Translation (ITAL 310)

Professor Mazzotta introduces students to the Divine Comedy, focusing on the first four cantos of Inferno. Stylistic, thematic and formal features of the poem are discussed in the context of its original title, Comedy. The first canto is read to establish the double voice of the poet-pilgrim and to contrast the immanent journey with those described by Dante's literary precursors. Among these is the pilgrim's guide, Virgil. The following cantos are read with special attention to the ways in which Dante positions his poem vis-à-vis the classical tradition. The novelty of Dante's otherworldly journey is here addressed in terms of the relationship, introduced in the previous lecture in the context of the Vita nuova, between love and knowledge or, more precisely, between their respective faculties, will and intellect.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Explanation of Title; Three Levels of Style; Formal Structure
00:07 - Chapter 2. Canto I and Its Double Narrative Focus
19:02 - Chapter 3. Shifting the Language from Mind to Body
25:31 - Chapter 4. Meeting Virgil the Poet and Neo-Platonic Philosopher
37:01 - Chapter 5. Canto II: Identity and Purpose of Journey
42:21 - Chapter 6. Canto III: Entering the Gate of Hell; An Idea of a Linear Novel
51:31 - Chapter 7. Canto IV: Into the Garden and Limbo's Fantastic Figures
01:04:13 - Chapter 8. Question and Answer

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Fall 2008.

2. Vita Nuova
01:09:11
YaleCourses
11 Views · 3 years ago

Dante in Translation (ITAL 310)

This lecture is devoted to the Vita nuova, Dante's autobiographical account of his "double apprenticeship" in poetry and love. The poet's love for Beatrice is explored as the catalyst for his search for a new poetic voice. Medieval theories of love and the diverse poetics they inspired are discussed in contrast. The novelty of the poet's final resolution is tied to the relationship he discovers between love and knowledge. This relationship is then placed in its larger cultural context to highlight the Vita nuova's anticipation of the Divine Comedy.

00:00 - Chapter 1. An Introduction to "Vita nuova" and Its Autobiographical Structure
10:52 - Chapter 2. Double Poise Structure
23:41 - Chapter 3. Dante Writes about Love
34:53 - Chapter 4. Understandings of Love and Friendship
45:12 - Chapter 5. The Sweet New Style
51:56 - Chapter 6. The Apparition of Beatrice; Moving in Circles
59:32 - Chapter 7. "Vita nuova" as a Preamble to the "Divine Comedy"
01:02:39 - Chapter 8. Remarks on Dante's Life; Question and Answer

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Fall 2008.

1. Introduction
00:18:46
YaleCourses
9 Views · 3 years ago

Dante in Translation (ITAL 310)

Professor Mazzotta introduces students to the general scheme and scope of the Divine Comedy and to the life of its author. Various genres to which the poem belongs (romance, epic, vision) are indicated, and special attention is given to its place within the encyclopedic tradition. The poem is then situated historically through an overview of Dante's early poetic and political careers and the circumstances that led to his exile. Professor Mazzotta concludes by discussing the central role Dante's exile was to play in his poetic project.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction: A Circle of Knowledge
07:28 - Chapter 2. Dante in a Historical Context
17:16 - Chapter 3. General Housekeeping

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Fall 2008

26.  Review for Final Exam
00:55:18
YaleCourses
12 Views · 3 years ago

The American Novel Since 1945 (ENGL 291)

In this review session for the final exam, Professor Hungerford fields practice questions in an open forum so that students know what will be expected of their performance. She offers study advice from her own experience, and gratifies students' curiosity about some of her own preferences and reservations regarding choices for the syllabus.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Exam Review
03:41 - Chapter 2. ID Questions
06:40 - Chapter 3. Passage Identification
22:31 - Chapter 4. Constructing Exam Essays
35:11 - Chapter 5. Student Questions

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Spring 2008.

25. Students' Choice Novel: Jonathan Safran Foer, Everything is Illuminated (cont.)
00:48:56
YaleCourses
11 Views · 3 years ago

The American Novel Since 1945 (ENGL 291)

In her final lecture of the course, Professor Hungerford evaluates Jonathan Safran Foer's Everything is Illuminated with respect to one of her areas of expertise, American writing about the Holocaust. She points out how the novel takes on some of the questions of trauma theory in its examination of both the pain and the healing power of repetition. The most innovative characteristic of Foer's novel is, for Hungerford, the way it addresses the inheritance of the Holocaust for third-generation Jews in America. The novel finds new ways to provide witness for and connection to their grandparents' experiences in Europe, but also displaces a traditional Holocaust discovery narrative from the Jewish child of survivors to the Eastern European grandchild of those complicit in the destruction of shtetl life.

00:00 - Chapter 1. How to Define a Period of Literature: Locating Foer's Significance
05:57 - Chapter 2. Trauma Theory and the Holocaust: Foer's Use of the Witness
16:40 - Chapter 3. The Double Remove: A Third Generation of Memory
31:54 - Chapter 4. Metafictional Authorship
38:32 - Chapter 5. From Victims to Perpetrators

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Spring 2008.

24. Students' Choice Novel: Jonathan Safran Foer, Everything is Illuminated
00:45:48
YaleCourses
9 Views · 3 years ago

The American Novel Since 1945 (ENGL 291)

In this first of two lectures on the students' choice end-of-semester novel, Jonathan Safran Foer's Everything is Illuminated (2002), Professor Hungerford models several methods for approaching and evaluating a new work of fiction. She shows how Foer borrows and adapts themes and styles from other authors on the syllabus in service to his ambition as a writer to demonstrate the power of narrative fiction to address the great historical traumas of our time. In thus attempting to marry the nineteenth-century social novel with Postmodernist, or late Modernist, techniques, Foer participates in an emerging tradition that risks the confusion between resonant emotion and sentimental cliché.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Foer's Formative Ambition
03:58 - Chapter 2. Dialog with the Literary Tradition
11:23 - Chapter 3. Absence at the Heart of Desire: Foer's Negative Spaces
22:05 - Chapter 4. Bringing Together Sentiment and Formal Play: A Social Postmodern Novel
26:39 - Chapter 5. The Campus Novel
31:32 - Chapter 6. Sentiment vs. Sentimentality

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Spring 2008.

23.  Edward P. Jones, The Known World (cont.)
00:46:44
YaleCourses
7 Views · 3 years ago

The American Novel Since 1945 (ENGL 291)

In this second lecture on The Known World, Professor Hungerford addresses Edward P. Jones's ambitious and ambivalent relation to literacy. Jones shows us the power of narrative to bring together the fragmentation of the world, but is at the same time deeply aware of the fragility of text, all of the ways it can be destroyed, misinterpreted, abused, or lost. The son of an illiterate mother, Jones--who, it seems, composed and memorized large portions of The Known World before setting anything down in print--models a form of literary self-consciousness infused with the moral dilemmas of slavery and freedom that is unique among contemporary novels.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Meditations on the Difficulty of Writing: The Right-to-Left Directionality of Creation
13:43 - Chapter 2. The Fragile Power of Text: Insubstantiality of Freedom
20:45 - Chapter 3. The Complicity of Creation
24:58 - Chapter 4. The Durability of Plastic Arts: Augustus's Carving and Alice's Weaving
33:32 - Chapter 5. Edward P. Jones's Authorial Project: Weaving Unity into the Fragmented Modern Narrative

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Spring 2008.

22.  Edward P. Jones, The Known World
00:50:58
YaleCourses
16 Views · 3 years ago

The American Novel Since 1945 (ENGL 291)

In the first of her two lectures on Edward P. Jones's The Known World, Professor Hungerford begins from the novel's title, asking what counts as knowledge in the novel and why knowledge is central to the story. This leads to related questions: who is a knower, and what can be known? Highlighting several different versions of how knowledge of the past is communicated through storytelling within the novel, she draws distinctions between Jones's model of historical knowledge and that of other writers on the syllabus. Professor Hungerford suggests that Jones revives a nineteenth-century form of the novel when his narrator takes on a God-like omniscience, but unlike the nineteenth-century novel's narrators, Jones's omniscient narrator provides little in the way of God-like consolation.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Initial Student Reactions: The Known World in the Wake of Morrison
06:31 - Chapter 2. A Historical Novel: Reactions to Postmodern Historical Theory
17:09 - Chapter 3. Threadlike Narratives and the Grand Tapestry: Modes of Telling Truth
34:19 - Chapter 4. The Question of Knowing: A Syllabus Retrospective
39:59 - Chapter 5. Jones's Anti-modernist Return to an Omniscient Narrator

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Spring 2008.

21. Philip Roth, The Human Stain (cont.)
00:45:59
YaleCourses
7 Views · 3 years ago

The American Novel Since 1945 (ENGL 291)

In this final lecture on The Human Stain, Professor Hungerford argues that desire is the engine of narrative, for Roth, both at the structural level and in the very grammar of his sentences. Sex and writing are alike in their attempt to cross the boundaries between persons. Passing does not only occur racially, but is also likened to the process whereby a writer, like Roth or his proxy Nathan Zuckerman, comes to inhabit the subjectivities of other characters. One effect of these conflations--for example, Nathan standing for Faunia as he dances with Coleman--is to raise the threat of homoeroticism, which for Roth collapses difference with same-sex desire. Such stereotypes are a controversial characteristic of Roth's fiction, which nevertheless continues to draw great admiration.

00:00 - Chapter 1. The Engine of Desire: The Structure of Roth's Language
17:32 - Chapter 2. Homoerotic Desire: The Danger of Overcoming Difference
29:57 - Chapter 3. Nathan as Narrator: Blankness or Secrecy?
40:14 - Chapter 4. Roth's Relationship to His Texts: Autobiography and Fiction

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Spring 2008.

20. Philip Roth, The Human Stain (cont.)
00:49:36
YaleCourses
6 Views · 3 years ago

The American Novel Since 1945 (ENGL 291)

In this lecture Professor Hungerford discusses how the novels we read are shaped by legal and market constraints. She traces a history of censorship from the Comstock laws, to the policing of Joyce's Ulysses and Ginsberg's Howl, and shows how changes in publishing practices have tended to penalize more unusual, less profitable books. Hungerford also touches on the canon debates of the 80s and 90s (citing John Guillory and Toni Morrison), and the issues of intellectual property and internationalization raised by digital literature. Finally, she points to some ways that Philip Roth, despite his controversial representations of Judaism and of women, succeeds in tackling fundamental human concerns.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Observing Local Bookshops: Patterns of Display and Absence
12:28 - Chapter 2. The History of Legal Censorship in the United States
23:43 - Chapter 3. New Forms of Censorship: The Influence of the Market
31:41 - Chapter 4. The Other Side of the Coin: Intellectual Property and Infinite Access in the Digital Age
35:15 - Chapter 5. Problems in Deriving the Modern Literary Canon: A Proliferation of Points of View

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Spring 2008.

19. Philip Roth, The Human Stain
00:48:52
YaleCourses
7 Views · 3 years ago

The American Novel Since 1945 (ENGL 291)

In this lecture on The Human Stain, Professor Hungerford traces the ways that Roth's novel conforms to and pushes beyond the genre she calls the Identity Plot. Exploring the various ways that race can be construed as category, mark, biology, or performance, the novel ultimately construes the defining characteristic of its protagonist's race to be its very concealment. Secrecy is, for Roth, the source of identity and the driving force behind desire and narrative.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Roth's Mundane Modern Context: Historical Markers of the 1990s
05:59 - Chapter 2. Roth's Identity Plot: The Performance of the Self
16:36 - Chapter 3. Classification as Definition
21:25 - Chapter 4. The Body as Sign: Moments of Irreducible Otherness
27:18 - Chapter 5. Speech and Secrecy: Locating Identity in the Interval
41:31 - Chapter 6. Desire and Difference

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Spring 2008.

18. Cormac McCarthy, Blood Meridian (cont.)
00:40:20
YaleCourses
17 Views · 3 years ago

The American Novel Since 1945 (ENGL 291)

In this second lecture on Blood Meridian, Professor Hungerford builds a wide-ranging argument about the status of good and evil in the novel from a small detail, the Bible the protagonist carries with him in spite of his illiteracy. This detail is one of many in the text that continually lure us to see the kid in the light of a traditional hero, superior to his surroundings, developing his responses in a familiar narrative structure of growth. McCarthy's real talent, and his real challenge, Hungerford argues, is in fact to have invoked the moral weight of his sources--biblical, literary, and historical--while emptying them of moral content. Much as the kid holds the Bible an object and not a spiritual guide, McCarthy seizes the material of language--its sound, its cadences--for ambiguous, if ambitious, ends.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Structural Allusions: McCarthy's Formulation of the Hero
15:08 - Chapter 2. Maturation without Morality: Revising the Bildungsroman
24:50 - Chapter 3. Asserting Immortality: McCarthy's Literary Ambitions
33:12 - Chapter 4. The Bible of the Illiterate Kid: Literary Artifacts and Empty Scripture

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Spring 2008.

17. Cormac McCarthy, Blood Meridian
00:50:13
YaleCourses
24 Views · 3 years ago

The American Novel Since 1945 (ENGL 291)

In this first of two lectures on Blood Meridian, Professor Hungerford walks us through some of the novel's major sources and influences, showing how McCarthy engages both literary tradition and American history, and indeed questions of origins and originality itself. The Bible, Moby-Dick, Paradise Lost, the poetry of William Wordsworth, and the historical narrative of Sam Chamberlain all contribute to the style and themes of this work that remains, in its own right, a provocative meditation on history, one that explores the very limits of narrative and human potential.

00:00 - Chapter 1. The Literary Tradition: Allusions and Revisions
08:49 - Chapter 2. Eradicating Interiority: "Moby Dick"
20:50 - Chapter 3. Modeling Evil: "Paradise Lost"
30:13 - Chapter 4: Rejecting Innocence: Wordsworth
34:59 - Chapter 5. Historical Sources: Samuel Chamberlin's "My Confession"

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Spring 2008.

16. Marilynne Robinson, Housekeeping (cont.)
00:49:29
YaleCourses
11 Views · 3 years ago

The American Novel Since 1945 (ENGL 291)

At the very beginning of the course, Professor Hungerford offered students the opportunity to pitch a novel of their choice to fill the final spot on the syllabus. Today six students rise to that challenge, presenting their arguments for why each book would complete the intellectual trajectory established thus far. While the Teaching Assistants tally the results of the class vote, Professor Hungerford provides some final thoughts about the theme of loss in Marilynne Robinson's Housekeeping. The effacement of the body in this novel, and the beauty of absence and hunger, result in what Hungerford terms an "anorexic aesthetic" that raises problems for feminist interpretation.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Novel Pitch Day
02:03 - Chapter 2. Emma's Pitch: "Giovanni's Room"
06:44 - Chapter 3. Kelsey's Pitch: "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest"
12:25 - Chapter 4. Miranda's Pitch: "Play It As It Lays"
18:06 - Chapter 5. Will's Pitch: "Jesus' Son"
22:31 - Chapter 6. Eli's Pitch: "Everything Is Illuminated"
28:03 - Chapter 7. Roger's Pitch: "What Is the What"
36:30 - Chapter 8 Back to "Housekeeping": The Logic of Absence

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Spring 2008.

15.  Marilynne Robinson, Housekeeping
00:46:52
YaleCourses
11 Views · 3 years ago

The American Novel Since 1945 (ENGL 291)

Professor Hungerford situates Marilynne Robinson's novel Housekeeping (1980) in a tradition of American writing about the individual's relationship to nature that includes the powerful influences of the Bible, Herman Melville, and Ralph Waldo Emerson. The loss of identity that Emerson describes as becoming a "transparent eyeball" in the woods, Robinson brings into the realm of the home, the built environment. The individual voice and its guiding consciousness are all mixed up in the material substance of the world, giving them a concurrent fixity and fragility that it is Robinson's talent, and our challenge, to explore.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Names and Introductions: My Name is Ruth
10:09 - Chapter 2. Crafting Social Worlds: The Communal and the Singular
20:14 - Chapter 3. Permeable Identity: Anonymity and Ghostliness
31:03 - Chapter 4. The "Soul All Unaccompanied": Matching Language to Consciousness

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Spring 2008.

14.  Maxine Hong Kingston, The Woman Warrior
00:50:56
YaleCourses
14 Views · 3 years ago

The American Novel Since 1945 (ENGL 291)

In this lecture at the midpoint of the course Professor Hungerford takes stock of the syllabus thus far and to come by laying out her guiding thesis of the Identity Plot, a rubric for understanding novels in the twentieth century as, she argues, the Marriage Plot is a rubric for understanding novels in the nineteenth century. Referring to examples throughout the syllabus, but especially Maxine Hong Kingston's Woman Warrior, Hungerford describes the overriding tendency of American novels written after 1945 to explore the tension between individual and collective identities and to interrogate the artistic and political stakes of competing notions of authenticity.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Course Thesis: The Identity Plot
26:04 - Chapter 2. The Roles of Literary Fiction and Genre Fiction
31:12 - Chapter 3. Multiple Forms of Identity
39:43 - Chapter 4. Definition Through Delimitation: The End of Identity and the Rise of History

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Spring 2008.

13. Toni Morrison, The Bluest Eye
00:50:01
YaleCourses
16 Views · 3 years ago

The American Novel Since 1945 (ENGL 291)

Professor Hungerford draws a contrast between Toni Morrison and most of the writers studied up to this point in the course by pointing out how, for an African-American woman writer in particular, language is a site of violence. For all of her power to recuperate the voices of the oppressed, the novelist must be wary of the ways that breaking the silence, too, can constitute an act of invasion. As in the case of Pynchon, the word in The Bluest Eye enacts a near-physical touch; this is its pleasure and its danger. With inimitable complexity and grace, Morrison weaves her narrative around a young black girl who, in the void of her social persona, constructs a beautiful and poisonous fiction.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Morrison's Politics: The Other Side of the 1960s
07:16 - Chapter 2. Choosing a Form: Morrison's Use of the Novel
16:40 - Chapter 3. Complicated Sympathy: Cholly Breedlove
31:15 - Chapter 4. Negativities: The Other Engine of Narrative
42:56 - Chapter 5. Reading, Rape and Race: Poison in the Canon

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Spring 2008.

12. Thomas Pynchon, The Crying of Lot 49
00:49:28
YaleCourses
8 Views · 3 years ago

The American Novel Since 1945 (ENGL 291)

Professor Hungerford introduces this lecture by reviewing the ways that authors on the syllabus up to this point have dealt with the relationship between language and life, that collection of elusive or obvious things that for literary critics fall under the category of "the Real." The Real can shout out from a work of art, as it sometimes does in Black Boy, or haunt it, as in Lolita. It can elude authors like Kerouac and Barth for widely different reasons. Placing Pynchon firmly in the context of the political upheaval of the 1960s that he is often seen to avoid, Hungerford argues that Pynchon--no less than a writer of faith like Flannery O'Connor--is deeply invested in questions of meaning and emotional response, so that The Crying of Lot 49 is a sincere call for connection, and a lament for loss, as much as it is an ironic, playful puzzle.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Language and Reality: Course Review
09:18 - Chapter 2. Pynchon and Politics: Activism and Passivism in the 1960s
15:42 - Chapter 3. The Variable Roles of Oedipa Maas
36:02 - Chapter 4. Finding Reality in the Social Details

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Spring 2008.

11.  John Barth, Lost in the Funhouse
00:49:11
YaleCourses
11 Views · 3 years ago

The American Novel Since 1945 (ENGL 291)

In her lecture on John Barth's collection of stories Lost in the Funhouse, Professor Amy Hungerford delves beyond the superficial pleasures and frustrations of Barth's oft-cited metafictional masterwork to illuminate the profound commitment to language that his narrative risks entail. Foremost among Barth's concerns, Hungerford argues, is the multi-faceted relationship between language and love. Desire can drive a narrative, or disrupt it. Language can create desire, or replace it. Unifying the virtuosic variety of his tales is Barth's inquiry: Does language always stand in for a loss of bodily presence? Must the written word always exist as the shadow of the oral?

00:00 - Chapter 1. Barth, the Teacher
10:00 - Chapter 2. The Modernist Ambition in 'Night-Sea Journey'
25:27 - Chapter 3. Alienation and Desire
42:05 - Chapter 4. The Power of Voice

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Spring 2008.

10. J. D. Salinger, Franny and Zooey
00:47:30
YaleCourses
33 Views · 3 years ago

The American Novel Since 1945 (ENGL 291)

In this lecture on J. D. Salinger's Franny and Zooey, Professor Hungerford presents her argument about religion in the novel as an example to students of how to construct a sound literary critical paper using evidence from the text. Moving between large claims and close readings, Hungerford shows how Salinger prevents his investment in mysticism from becoming mystification by grounding his sense of the divine in the specificity of persons, the importance of family language and love. In this way writing, like the theme of acting that appears again and again in the novel, models a spiritual performance that brings together artist and audience in the partnership of human communication.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Forming a Literary Argument: Advice for Paper Writing
08:25 - Chapter 2. The Theological Theme: Specific Doctrine versus Syncretic Religion
29:06 - Chapter 3. Structures of Drama
35:08 - Chapter 4. Religion and Love: The Performance of Human Connection
44:38 - Chapter 5. Final Notes on Paper Writing

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Spring 2008.

9. Jack Kerouac, On the Road (cont.)
00:45:52
YaleCourses
18 Views · 3 years ago

The American Novel Since 1945 (ENGL 291)

In this second lecture on On The Road, Professor Hungerford addresses some of the obstacles and failures to the novel's high ambitions for achieving American community through an immediacy of communication. Sal Paradise's desire to cross racial boundaries, for example, seems ultimately more exploitative than expansive; Dean's exuberant language of "Yes!" and "Wow!" devolves into meaningless gibberish. And yet the novel's mystical vision of something called "America" persists, a cultural icon that continues to engage the interest of readers, scholars, and artists. Among these latter is the digital art collaborative Young-Hae Chang Heavy Industries, with whose online work DAKOTA Hungerford concludes the class.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Kerouac's Mythical America: Trans-historical Communities
22:03 - Chapter 2. Defining American Identity: Sal's Illusory Vision of Mystical Oneness
30:01 - Chapter 3. Dean and Sal, Again: The Theme of Sadness
41:12 - Chapter 4. The Publication History: Creating a Literary Object

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Spring 2008.

8. Jack Kerouac, On the Road
00:47:48
YaleCourses
7 Views · 3 years ago

The American Novel Since 1945 (ENGL 291)

Professor Amy Hungerford's lecture on Kerouac's On the Road begins by contrasting the Beats' ambition for language's direct relation to lived experience with a Modernist sense of difficulty and mediation. She goes on to discuss the ways that desire structures the novel, though not in the ways that we might immediately expect. The very blatant pursuit of sex with women in the novel, for example, obscures the more significant desire for connection among men, particularly the narrator Sal's love for Dean Moriarty. The apparent desire for the freedom of the open road, too, Hungerford argues, exists in a necessary conjunction with the idealized comforts of a certain middle-class American domesticity, signaled by the repeated appearance of pie.

00:00 - Chapter 1. The Beats: Similarities and Differences to Literary Modernism
09:46 - Chapter 2. A New Use of Language: Mirroring the Speed of Experience
18:13 - Chapter 3. "The Prophet of 'Wow'": The Language of Dean Moriarty/Neal Cassady
29:48 - Chapter 4. Dean and Sal: Tangled Sexual Tensions
33:56 - Chapter 5. The Hunger Metaphor: The American Culture of Consumption
40:21 - Chapter 6. Modes of Craftedness: Carlo Marx's Papier-Mache Mountains

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Spring 2008.

7. Vladimir Nabokov, Lolita (cont.)
00:46:43
YaleCourses
14 Views · 3 years ago

The American Novel Since 1945 (ENGL 291)

In the last of three lectures on Lolita, Professor Amy Hungerford discusses the broader context of Nabokov's relation to his novel: both the debate it inspires surrounding censorship and artistic originality, and the concern it evokes in him about the work of art's distillation of the living world or word. Hungerford masterfully draws connections between Nabokov's interest in lepidoptery--butterfly collecting--with his evident fear that the printed word become lapidary, or stone-like. Just as we can no longer appreciate the beauty of a butterfly's motion, once it has been pinned down, so too might living language fall victim to a kind of violence on the page, a formal equivalent to the thematic violence that increases as the novel progresses.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Censorship
11:11 - Chapter 2. The Second Road Trip: Lolita's Agency
24:45 - Chapter 3. Canceled Children: The Symbol of Elphinstone
35:03 - Chapter 4. Two Forms of the Aesthetic: The Living and the Lapidary

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Spring 2008.

6. Guest Lecture by Andrew Goldstone
00:43:26
YaleCourses
27 Views · 3 years ago

The American Novel Since 1945 (ENGL 291)

In this guest lecture, Teaching Fellow Andrew Goldstone provides us with some key concepts for understanding Modernism and Nabokov's relation in particular to his literary forebears T. S. Eliot, James Joyce, and Marcel Proust. Positing the "knight's move" as a description of Nabokov's characteristically indirect, evasive style, Goldstone argues that Nabokov's parodies of Modernist form in fact reveal his deep commitment to some of the same aesthetic principles. While the knight's move often indicates a playful attitude towards tradition, it also betrays a traumatic rupture with the past, reflecting a sense of exile that links Nabokov's art with the violence of Lolita's protagonist, Humbert.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Defining Literary Modernism
10:01 - Chapter 2. The Knight's Move: Nabokov on Tradition and Originality
15:56 - Chapter 3. The Influence of Joyce
27:35 - Chapter 4. Reading Nabokov as an Exile

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Spring 2008.

5. Vladimir Nabokov, Lolita
00:51:31
YaleCourses
7 Views · 3 years ago

The American Novel Since 1945 (ENGL 291)

Professor Amy Hungerford introduces the first of three lectures on Nabokov's Lolita by surveying students' reactions to the novel, highlighting the conflicting emotions readers feel, enjoying Nabokov's virtuosic style, but being repelled by the violence of his subject matter. Nabokov's childhood in tsarist Russia provides some foundation for his interest in memory, imagination, and language. Finally, Professor Hungerford shows how Nabokov, through the voice of his protagonist Humbert, in his own voice in the epilogue, and in the voice of "John Ray, Jr." in the foreword, preempts moral judgments in a novel that celebrates the power of the imagination and the seductive thrill of language.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Lolita: Initial Student Responses
09:49 - Chapter 2. Historical Context: A Brief Biography of Nabokov
15:33 - Chapter 3. Blurring Narrative Layers: Locating the Author in John Ray Jr.'s Forward
23:49 - Chapter 4. Seduction and Cliché
34:22 - Chapter 5. Edgar Allan Poe's "Annabel Lee"
45:54 - Chapter 6. Morality and Manipulation

Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu


This course was recorded in Spring 2008.

4. Flannery O'Connor, Wise Blood (cont.)
00:44:46
YaleCourses
10 Views · 3 years ago

The American Novel Since 1945 (ENGL 291)

In this second lecture on Flannery O'Connor's Wise Blood, Professor Amy Hungerford continues to offer several specific contexts in which to read and understand the novel. Having used O'Connor's letters to delve into her theological commitments in the previous lecture, Professor Hungerford now explores the southern social context, particularly with respect to race and gender, and the New Critical writing program of which O'Connor was a product. Hungerford finally suggests that O'Connor's writing illuminates the important--and perhaps undertheorized--link between the institutionalization of formal unity by the New Critics, and their strong religious influences.

00:00 - Chapter 1. On the Depiction of Women: Fragmented Bodies and Southern Society
07:36 - Chapter 2. Modes of Violence: Abused Children, Police Brutality, and Racism
16:52 - Chapter 3. Exploring the Narrative Purpose of Violent Imagery: The Question of Sympathy
24:13 - Chapter 4. Returning to a Theological Structure: A Close Reading of Chapter Seven
35:36 - Chapter 5. New Criticism and the Institutionalization of Modernism

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Spring 2008.

3. Flannery O'Connor, Wise Blood
00:47:07
YaleCourses
15 Views · 3 years ago

The American Novel Since 1945 (ENGL 291)

Professor Amy Hungerford's first lecture on Flannery O'Connor's Wise Blood addresses questions of faith and interpretation. She uses excerpts from O'Connor's copious correspondence to introduce the critical framework of O'Connor's Catholicism, but invites us to look beyond the question of redemption. What do characters see in this text, and what are they blind to? What do we see as readers, and how does methodology shape this vision?

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction: The Catholicism of Flannery O'Connor
12:27 - Chapter 2. The Search for Home: Haze's Essex
24:53 - Chapter 3. The Depiction of Nothingness: The Landscapes of O'Connor
33:42 - Chapter 4. The Symbolism of Senses: Hazel Motes's Eyes and Ears
38:43 - Chapter 5. Fragmented Bodies: What We Miss When We Limit Our Interpretative Lens

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Spring 2008.

2.  Richard Wright, Black Boy
00:50:30
YaleCourses
8 Views · 3 years ago

The American Novel Since 1945 (ENGL 291)

Professor Amy Hungerford continues her discussion of Richard Wright's classic American autobiography, Black Boy. Through a close analysis of key passages, she demonstrates an oscillation in the narrative between the socioeconomic deprivations and racial jeopardy confronting its characters, and the compensations to be found in sensual experience, the imagination, and in particular, the power of words. Dramatizing the editorial struggle evident in letters between Wright and Book-of-the-Month-Club-President Dorothy Canfield Fisher, Professor Hungerford shows the high stakes of Wright's uncompromising portrait of America's failed ideals at a time when those ideals are being tested during the Second World War.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Classifying the Literary Object: Fiction and Autobiography
06:06 - Chapter 2. Choices in the Construction of an Autobiography: A Close Reading of the First Scene
11:26 - Chapter 3. Decoding Meaning in Wright's Descriptive "Catalogs"
16:58 - Chapter 4. Powerlessness and Exertions of Agency
28:00 - Chapter 5. Language and Power: The Voices of the Author
38:36 - Chapter 6. The Fisher-Wright Letters: Author vs. Audience, How Outside Forces Shape the Formation of a Personal Account

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Spring 2008.

1. Introductions
00:47:36
YaleCourses
15 Views · 3 years ago

The American Novel Since 1945 (ENGL 291)

In this first lecture Professor Hungerford introduces the course's academic requirements and some of its central concerns. She uses a magazine advertisement for James Joyce's Ulysses and an essay by Vladimir Nabokov (author of Lolita, a novel on the syllabus) to establish opposing points of view about what is required to be a competent reader of literature. The contrast between popular emotional appeal and detached artistic judgment frames literary debates from the Modernist, and through the post-45 period. In the second half of lecture, Hungerford shows how the controversies surrounding the publication of Richard Wright's Black Boy highlight the questions of truth, memory, and autobiography that will continue to resurface throughout the course.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction: Major Themes
08:07 - Chapter 2. Course Requirements
13:43 - Chapter 3. How To Read: On Joyce and Nabokov
29:30 - Chapter 4. Introduction to Richard Wright's "Black Boy": Autobiography and Editorial Influence
43:58 - Chapter 5. Conclusions: "Black Boy" and Major Course Themes

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Spring 2008.

26. Suicide, Part III: The morality of suicide and course conclusion
00:47:47
YaleCourses
7 Views · 3 years ago

Death (PHIL 176)

The lecture begins by examining the consequences a suicide has on both the person committing it and those around this person. The question is raised, however, whether this factor is the only that counts morally, as utilitarians claim, or whether other factors matter morally as well, as deontologists claim. The moral relevance of a deontological prohibition against harming the innocent is considered. A concluding summary of the course is offered.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction: The Consequences of Suicide
08:25 - Chapter 2. Utilitarianism on the Morality of Suicide
13:21 - Chapter 3. Deontology and Prohibition against Harming the Innocent
28:33 - Chapter 4. Factoring Consent into Committing Suicide
41:17 - Chapter 5. Summary and Conclusion

Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu


This course was recorded in Spring 2007.

25. Suicide, Part II: Deciding under uncertainty
00:50:16
YaleCourses
8 Views · 3 years ago

Death (PHIL 176)

The discussion of suicide continues. A few more cases are introduced to consider circumstances under which it might be rational to end one's life, and more graphs are drawn that show relevant variations in the quality of one's life. A question is then posed about how one should make a decision about continuing or ending life, given that one cannot know the future with certainty. Finally, two quick moral arguments concerning suicide which rest on theological premises are presented.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Is Suicide Itself Rational? A Time-Value Analysis
12:58 - Chapter 2. To Continue or End Life Given the Uncertainty of Death
25:30 - Chapter 3. Rationalizing Suicide in Cases of Illness
36:40 - Chapter 4. Introduction to the Morality of Suicide: Is Life a Gift?

Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu


This course was recorded in Spring 2007.

24. Suicide, Part I: The rationality of suicide
00:45:19
YaleCourses
8 Views · 3 years ago

Death (PHIL 176)

This is the first of a series of lectures on suicide. Two very distinct contexts are presented in which the subject can be further explored. The first is rationality and the question of under what circumstances it makes sense to end one's own life. The second is morality and the question of whether we can ever ethically justify resorting to suicide. The lecture's focus is on the rational requirements of suicide, and Professor Kagan introduces a number of cases which demonstrate that ending one's life, in certain instances, may be rationally sound.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction to Suicide: Does it Make Sense? Distinguishing Issues of Rationality and Morality
05:14 - Chapter 2. When Is It Rational to Commit Suicide? Problems with the Two-State Requirement
17:11 - Chapter 3. Is Life Worth Having in the First Place? An Exploration of Intrinsic Value
28:51 - Chapter 4. Medical Complications: Rationale for Euthanasia
37:35 - Chapter 5. Suicide on a Positive-Negative Life Curve

Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu


This course was recorded in Spring 2007.

23. How to live given the certainty of death
00:46:35
YaleCourses
5 Views · 3 years ago

Death (PHIL 176)

In this lecture, Professor Kagan invites students to pose the question of how one should live life knowing that it will certainly end in death. He also explores the issue of how we should set our goals and how we should go about achieving them, bearing in mind the time constraints. Other questions raised are how this ultimately affects the quality of our work and our accomplishments, as well as how we decide what is worth doing in life.

00:00 - Chapter 1. How Carefully Should We Live?
11:21 - Chapter 2. Time Constraints and Goals: Finding Appropriate Contents for Life
17:30 - Chapter 3. Quantity of Life: The More, the Better?
32:38 - Chapter 4. Semi-Immortality through Accomplishments
40:21 - Chapter 5. Life Is Suffering: An Alternative Approach to Living

Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu


This course was recorded in Spring 2007.

22. Fear of death
00:47:50
YaleCourses
9 Views · 3 years ago

Death (PHIL 176)

Professor Kagan explores the issue of how thinking about death may influence the way we live. Fear as an emotional response to death is discussed as well as whether it is appropriate and under what conditions. A distinction is made between fear of the process of dying, and fear of death itself and what may come when one is dead. Finally, a number of other negative emotions are considered as possible appropriate responses to death and dying, such as anger, sadness, and sorrow.

00:00 - Chapter 1. How Should Thinking about Death Influence Behavior?
02:14 - Chapter 2. Is Fear of Death a Rational Appropriate Response?
08:40 - Chapter 3. Required Conditions for Feeling Fear of Death
22:06 - Chapter 4. What Is Meant by Fear? How Much of This Fear Is Appropriate?
34:29 - Chapter 5. Anger as Another Emotional Reaction to Death
44:49 - Chapter 6. Sorrow and Preciousness: Other Emotions on Death and Conclusion

Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu


This course was recorded in Spring 2007.

21. Other bad aspects of death, Part II
00:49:47
YaleCourses
4 Views · 3 years ago

Death (PHIL 176)

Further bad aspects of death are considered, including ubiquity, or the fact that death may occur at any time and strike anyone. Professor Kagan invites students to contemplate the possibility of death-free time periods, vacation spots, and activities. Then there is consideration of the value of the human condition, which consists of life, followed by death. Finally, the question is raised as to whether it could be appropriate to refuse to face the facts about our mortality. Professor Kagan distinguishes between two ways in which thinking about these could influence human behavior. On the one hand, it may give one the reason to behave differently; on the other hand, it may just cause a change in behavior.

00:00 - Chapter 1. How Much Time Do We Have Left?
07:00 - Chapter 2. The Ubiquity of Death
16:17 - Chapter 3. What is the Value of Life with Death? Positive and Negative Interaction Effects
27:59 - Chapter 4. "Better Off Never to Have Been Born": A Rationale
32:55 - Chapter 5. Should We Even Think About Death to Live Life?
47:26 - Chapter 6. Controlling the Impact of Thinking about Death and Conclusion

Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu

This course was recorded in Spring 2007.

20. The value of life, Part II; Other bad aspects of death, Part I
00:50:40
YaleCourses
6 Views · 3 years ago

Death (PHIL 176)

Lecture 20 continues the discussion of the value of life. It considers the neutral container theory, which holds that the value of life is simply a function of its contents, both pleasant and painful, and contrasts this with the valuable container theory, which assigns value to being alive itself. The lecture then turns to a consideration of some of the other aspects of death that may contribute to the badness of death. Among the issues addressed are the inevitability, variability and unpredictability of death.

00:00 - Chapter 1. What's Missing from the Experience Machine?
05:57 - Chapter 2. The Neutral and Valuable Container Theories: What about Life Is Valuable?
17:05 - Chapter 3. The Fantastic Valuable Container Theory: The Contents Really Matter
26:56 - Chapter 4. Is Deprivation the Only Badness of Death? Consideration of Inevitability
35:16 - Chapter 5. Variability and Unpredictability of Death
43:59 - Chapter 6. Can an Ideal Life Be Planned?

Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu


This course was recorded in Spring 2007.

19. Immortality Part II; The value of life, Part I
00:49:01
YaleCourses
13 Views · 3 years ago

Death (PHIL 176)

The lecture begins with further exploration of the question of whether it is desirable to live forever under the right circumstances, and then turns to consideration of some alternative theories of the nature of well-being. What makes a life worth living? One popular theory is hedonism, but the thought experiment of being on an "experience machine" suggests that this view may be inadequate.

00:00 - Chapter 1. What Kind of Life Is Worth Living Forever?
12:47 - Chapter 2. Can Boredom Be Eradicated in Immortal Life?
19:10 - Chapter 3. What Makes a Good Life Good?
29:11 - Chapter 4. Hedonism: Does Pleasure Exclusively Define a Good Life?
40:47 - Chapter 5. Nozick's Experience Machine: The Perfect Floating Life
46:52 - Chapter 6. Conclusion

Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu


This course was recorded in Spring 2007.

18. The badness of death, Part III; Immortality, Part I
00:50:35
YaleCourses
12 Views · 3 years ago

Death (PHIL 176)

The discussion of the badness of death continues by asking whether it is bad that we do not exist before our birth. The views of a number of contemporary philosophers, such as Tom Nagle, Fred Feldman, and Derek Parfit, are introduced. Then Professor Kagan turns to the subject of immortality. Would it be desirable to live forever, and if so, under what circumstances one might enjoy such a prolonged existence? The lecture concludes with Bernard Williams' take on immortality which posits that no kind of human life can continue to be enjoyable and attractive for eternity.

00:00 - Chapter 1. The Modest Existence Clause
08:46 - Chapter 2. "Schmoss" of Life: Is it Bad?
22:01 - Chapter 3. Feldman and Parfit on Nonexistence before Life
33:45 - Chapter 4. Is Immortality the Antidote to Deprivation-Based Death?
49:26 - Chapter 5. Conclusion: A "Best" Immortal State?

Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu


This course was recorded in Spring 2007.

17. The badness of death, Part II: The deprivation account
00:51:37
YaleCourses
13 Views · 3 years ago

Death (PHIL 176)

This lecture continues to explore the issue of why death may be bad. According to the deprivation account, what is bad about death is the fact that because one ceases to exist, one becomes deprived of the good things in life. Being dead is not intrinsically bad; it is comparatively bad and one is worse off only by virtue of not being able to enjoy the things one enjoyed while alive, such as watching the sunset, listening to music, and discussing philosophy.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction: The Central Badness of Death
04:35 - Chapter 2. The Deprivation Account of Badness in Death
13:22 - Chapter 3. Epicurus: "When Does Death Become Bad?"
21:21 - Chapter 4. The Existence Requirement: Is It Necessary?
32:48 - Chapter 5. Should Death Be Bad for the Loss of the Unborn Person?
49:41 - Chapter 6. Conclusion

Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu


This course was recorded in Spring 2007.

16. Dying alone; The badness of death, Part I
00:49:51
YaleCourses
6 Views · 3 years ago

Death (PHIL 176)

Professor Kagan puts forward the claim that Tolstoy's character Ivan Ilych is quite the typical man in terms of his views on mortality. All of his life he has known that death is imminent but has never really believed it. When he suddenly falls ill and is about to die, the fact of his mortality shocks him. In trying to further access how people think about death, Professor Kagan explores the claim that "we all die alone," presents a variety of arguments against it and ends by considering whether the primary badness of death could lie in the effects on those who are left behind.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Ilyich's Reaction to Death: Typical, but Why?
01:34 - Chapter 2. Near-Death Experiences as Reminders of Mortality
08:11 - Chapter 3. "Everyone Dies Alone": Common Belief, but Necessary Truth?
13:53 - Chapter 4. Deconstructing the "Dying Alone" Statement
27:59 - Chapter 5. Weaknesses in Interpreting "Dying Alone" as Observation of Human Psychology
34:56 - Chapter 6. Introduction to Value Theory: Is Death Bad?

Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu


This course was recorded in Spring 2007.

15. The nature of death (cont.); Believing you will die
00:44:15
YaleCourses
7 Views · 3 years ago

Death (PHIL 176)

The lecture explores the question of the state of being dead. Even though the most logical claim seems to be that when a person stops P-functioning he or she is dead, a more careful consideration must allow for exceptions, such as when one is asleep or in a coma. Professor Kagan then suggests that on some level nobody believes that he or she is going to die. As a case in point, he takes Tolstoy's famous character Ivan Ilych.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction -- Accommodating Sleep in the Definition of Death
03:36 - Chapter 2. Specification: The Ability to Engage in P-Functioning
13:32 - Chapter 3. Nobody Believes that they will Die: An Analysis
27:49 - Chapter 4. Can Imagining Death Work? Flaws in Freud's Argument
36:11 - Chapter 5. Nobody Believes in Bodily Death: The Death of Ivan Ilyich

Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu


This course was recorded in Spring 2007.

14. What matters (cont.); The nature of death, Part I
00:47:18
YaleCourses
11 Views · 3 years ago

Death (PHIL 176)

The suggestion is made that what matters in survival is the future existence of someone with a personality similar to one's own. Professor Kagan then turns to the question, "what is it to die?". In answering this question, attention is first drawn to the bodily and mental functions that are crucial in defining the moment of death.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction: A Case for the Same Evolving Personality
10:48 - Chapter 2. What is it Like to Die? A Breakdown of Functions from a Physicalist's View
19:24 - Chapter 3. Identifying the Moment of Death for the Body
30:26 - Chapter 4. When Does Personality Begin or Cease to Exist?
40:09 - Chapter 5. What Has the Right to Live -- Me or My Body?

Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu

This course was recorded in Spring 2007.

13. Personal identity, Part IV; What matters?
00:48:53
YaleCourses
6 Views · 3 years ago

Death (PHIL 176)

The personality theory is revised to state that the key to personal identity is having the same personality provided that there is no branching, that is, provided there is no transfer or duplication of the same personality from one body to another. Similar "no branching" requirements are added to the other theories as well. At the end of class, Professor Kagan suggests a shift from thinking about the survival of the soul in terms of "what does it take to survive?" to "what is it that matters in survival?".

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction -- The Personality Theory and No Branching
05:29 - Chapter 2. Fission Is Not Allowed -- The Body Theorist's No Branching Rule
19:31 - Chapter 3. The Metaphysics of Soul-Splitting
35:57 - Chapter 4. What Matters in Survival? Refocusing the Question on Personal Identity
47:43 - Chapter 5. Conclusion

Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu

This course was recorded in Spring 2007.

12. Personal identity, Part III: Objections to the personality theory
00:51:51
YaleCourses
11 Views · 3 years ago

Death (PHIL 176)

The lecture focuses on the problems directly related to the personality theory as key to personal identity. The theory states that a person retains his or her individuality so long as he or she has the same ongoing personality. The main objection raised to this claim is the problem of duplication. The lecture explores cases in which the same personality has been transferred or exported to multiple bodies.

00:00 - Chapter 1. A Mad Scientist's Experiment to Determine Personal Identity
07:12 - Chapter 2. The Science Experiment Continued: Dilemmas in Mixed Personalities and Bodies
19:38 - Chapter 3. Duplication as an Objection to the Personality Theory
40:26 - Chapter 4. No Branching Clause - Acceptable under the Personality Theory?

Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu

This course was recorded in Spring 2007.

11. Personal identity, Part II: The body theory and the personality theory
00:50:35
YaleCourses
6 Views · 3 years ago

Death (PHIL 176)

Two more views regarding the metaphysical key to personal identity are discussed: the body view and the personality view. According to the body view, an individual is identified in terms of his or her physical body. According to the personality view, an individual is identified by his or her unique set of beliefs, desires, memories, goals, and so on.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Review of Soul Theory
03:07 - Chapter 2. The Body Theory of Personal Identity
25:47 - Chapter 3. Equating the Brain with the Identity -- Implications of the Body Theory
32:35 - Chapter 4. Physicalists: Personality as the Key to Personal Identity
46:39 - Chapter 5. Soul, Body, and Personality -- Is There a Correct View? Assessment by Torture

Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu

This course was recorded in Spring 2007.

10. Personal identity, Part I: Identity across space and time and the soul theory
00:49:50
YaleCourses
6 Views · 3 years ago

Death (PHIL 176)

The lecture focuses on the question of the metaphysical key to personal identity. What does it mean for a person that presently exists to be the very same person in the future? The first approach to answering this question is the "soul theory," that is, the key to being the same person is having the same soul. Difficulties with that approach are then discussed, independent of the question whether souls exist or not.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction
01:39 - Chapter 2. What Does It Mean to Survive? The Train Metaphor
14:04 - Chapter 3. The Aging of a Car and Space-Time Worms
30:30 - Chapter 4. Will I Survive My Death? The Dualist's Soul as the Metaphysical Glue
46:28 - Chapter 5. Is the Soul Truly the Key to Personal Identity?

Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu

This course was recorded in Spring 2007.

9. Plato, Part IV: Arguments for the immortality of the soul (cont.)
00:50:20
YaleCourses
19 Views · 3 years ago

Death (PHIL 176)

Professor Kagan elaborates on the "argument from simplicity" and discusses in detail Plato's claims that the soul is simple, changeless and therefore indestructible. The final Platonic argument under discussion is the "argument from essential properties" in which the essential properties of the soul are addressed. At the end of the lecture the question of whether one needs to argue for physicalism is posed.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Assumptions Made in the Argument from Simplicity
05:56 - Chapter 2. Plato's Defense against the Harmony Analogy
19:42 - Chapter 3. Essential and Contingent Properties and the Argument from Essential Properties
37:06 - Chapter 4. Kagan: "There is No Good Reason to Believe in Souls"
47:53 - Chapter 5. Qualifications and Conclusion

Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu

This course was recorded in Spring 2007.

8. Plato, Part III: Arguments for the immortality of the soul (cont.)
00:49:54
YaleCourses
9 Views · 3 years ago

Death (PHIL 176)

The lecture focuses exclusively on one argument for the immortality of the soul from Plato's Phaedo, namely, "the argument from simplicity." Plato suggests that in order for something to be destroyed, it must have parts, that is, it must be possible to "take it apart." Arguing that the soul is simple, that it does not have parts, Plato believes that it would logically follow that the soul is indestructible.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Frailties in "Recycling" and "Recollecting" Arguments
09:21 - Chapter 2. The Argument from Simplicity
19:01 - Chapter 3. Does Indestructibility and Invisibility of the Soul Necessarily Mean Immortality? Objections from Cebes and Simmias
30:36 - Chapter 4. Harmony as a Counter Analogy
42:36 - Chapter 5. Radio Waves - To Detect Rather Than to Sense the Soul

Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu

This course was recorded in Spring 2007.

7. Plato, Part II: Arguments for the immortality of the soul
00:46:38
YaleCourses
7 Views · 3 years ago

Death (PHIL 176)

The discussion of Plato's Phaedo continues, presenting more arguments for the existence and immortality of the soul. One such argument is "the argument from the nature of the forms," which states that because the forms are non-physical objects and cannot be grasped by something physical like the body, it follows that they must be grasped by the soul which must be non-physical as well. This argument is followed by the "argument from recycling" and "the argument from recollection."

00:00 - Chapter 1. Review of Plato's Heaven: Platonic Forms
04:13 - Chapter 2. Concerns and Issues Leading to the Development of Platonic Forms
14:17 - Chapter 3. The Argument from the Nature of the Forms
24:33 - Chapter 4. The Argument from Recycling
33:33 - Chapter 5. The Argument from Recollection
43:54 - Chapter 6. Do Plato's Arguments Suffice?

Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu

This course was recorded in Spring 2007.

6.  Arguments for the existence of the soul, Part IV; Plato, Part I
00:35:42
YaleCourses
11 Views · 3 years ago

Death (PHIL 176)

The lecture begins with a continued discussion of the Cartesian argument and its weaknesses. The lecture then turns to Plato's metaphysical views in the context of his work, Phaedo. The key point in the discussion is the idea that in addition to the ordinary empirical world that we are familiar with, we posit the existence of a second realm in which the Platonic forms exist. These forms are the abstract properties that we attribute to physical objects, such as beauty, justice, goodness and so on. Since it is the soul that conceives of these Platonic forms and ideas, Plato argues that the soul not only outlives the body but lasts forever. It is perfect, immaterial and indestructible.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Summary of the Cartesian Argument
04:57 - Chapter 2. Refuting the Cartesian Argument: The Morning and Evening Stars
19:25 - Chapter 3. Platonic Forms and the Immortality of the Soul
31:27 - Chapter 4. Conclusion

Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu

This course was recorded in Spring 2007.

5. Arguments for the existence of the soul, Part III: Free will and near-death experiences
00:48:02
YaleCourses
7 Views · 3 years ago

Death (PHIL 176)

Professor Kagan discusses in detail the argument of free will as proof for the existence of an immaterial soul. The argument consists of three premises: 1) We have free will. 2) Nothing subject to determinism has free will. 3) All purely physical systems are subject to determinism. The conclusion drawn from this is that humans are not a purely physical system; but Professor Kagan explains why this argument is not truly compelling. In addition, near-death experiences and the Cartesian argument are discussed at length.

00:00 - Chapter 1. The Dualist's Stance on Free Will and the Soul's Existence
04:57 - Chapter 2. Determinism and Free Will Cannot Coexist -- Inspecting Incompatibility
15:22 - Chapter 3. Positing the Soul's Existence for Near-Death Experiences
28:14 - Chapter 4. Does a Physical Understanding of Supernatural Phenomena Exist?
36:33 - Chapter 5. Introduction to Descartes's Cartesian Argument: The Mind and the Body Are Not the Same
45:34 - Chapter 6. Conclusion

Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu

This course was recorded in Spring 2007.

4. Introduction to Plato's Phaedo; Arguments for the existence of the soul, Part II
00:49:04
YaleCourses
4 Views · 3 years ago

Death (PHIL 176)

After a brief introduction to Plato's Phaedo, more arguments are offered in this lecture in defense of the existence of an immaterial soul. The emphasis here is on the fact that we need to believe in the existence of a soul in order to explain the claim that we possess free will. This is an argument dualists use as an objection to the physicalists: since no merely physical entity could have free will, there must be more to us than just being a physical object.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction to Plato's Phaedo
08:27 - Chapter 2. Creativity and Reason in Machines
13:43 - Chapter 3. Feelings in Machines, from Marvin to Hal
20:34 - Chapter 4. "Qualia" in Emotion and Consciousness: The Dualist's Defense and Its Weakness
42:20 - Chapter 5. Free Will as a Defense of the Soul and Conclusion

Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu

This course was recorded in Spring 2007.

3. Arguments for the existence of the soul, Part I
00:45:48
YaleCourses
10 Views · 3 years ago

Death (PHIL 176)

The lecture focuses on arguments that might be offered as proof for the existence of the soul. The first series of arguments discussed is those known as "inferences to the best explanation." That is, we posit the existence of things we cannot see so as to explain something else that is generally agreed to take place.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction: The P-Functioning Body
03:02 - Chapter 2. The Mind According to Physicalists and Dualists
12:17 - Chapter 3. Inferencing to the Best Explanation to Prove the Soul's Existence
19:55 - Chapter 4. Can Only the Soul Justify Feature F?
35:07 - Chapter 5. Abilities, Desires, Emotions -- Candidates for Feature F

Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu

This course was recorded in Spring 2007.

2. The nature of persons: dualism vs. physicalism
00:41:38
YaleCourses
9 Views · 3 years ago

Death (PHIL 176)

Professor Kagan discusses the two main positions with regard to the question, "What is a person?" On the one hand, there is the dualist view, according to which a person is a body and a soul. On the other hand, the physicalist view argues that a person is just a body. The body, however, has a certain set of abilities and is capable of a large range of activities.

00:00 - Chapter 1. "Is There Life After Death?" Asking the Right Question
13:25 - Chapter 2. Ways to Conceptualize Self-Identity
21:18 - Chapter 3. Dualists: The Body-Soul Perspective
39:00 - Chapter 4. The Physicalists: The Body Is a Body and Conclusion

Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu

This course was recorded in Spring 2007.

1. Course introduction
00:46:04
YaleCourses
7 Views · 3 years ago

Death (PHIL 176)

Professor Kagan introduces the course and the material that will be covered during the semester. He aims to clarify what the class will focus on in particular and which subjects it will steer away from. The emphasis will be placed on philosophical questions that arise when one contemplates the nature of death. The first half of the course will address metaphysical questions while the second half will focus on value theory.

00:00 - Chapter 1. What This Class Is NOT, and What This Class Is
06:38 - Chapter 2. Common Views on Death Are Wrong: How This Class Is Taught
14:20 - Chapter 3. Course Requirements, Materials, and Format
21:03 - Chapter 4. On Grading Thoughts on Death
38:50 - Chapter 5. Student Evaluations and Invitation

Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu

This course was recorded in Spring 2007.

25. Elizabeth Bishop (cont.)
00:41:26
YaleCourses
8 Views · 3 years ago

Modern Poetry (ENGL 310) with Langdon Hammer

In the final lecture of the course, Elizabeth Bishop's "Over 2,000 Illustrations and a Complete Concordance" is considered with an emphasis on Bishop's ambivalence towards the notion of home. The idea that modernists use poetry to do the work that religion no longer does is reflected upon, and connections are drawn between Bishop, Frost, Eliot, Stevens, and Crane. Bishop's "Visits to St. Elizabeth's" is considered as a formal rebuke to the ambitions of modernism alongside Auden's statement that "poetry makes nothing happen" but ultimately the two poets are shown to offer poetry as a solution to modern alienation in its capacity to renew human community through communication.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Elizabeth Bishop Poem: "Over 2,000 Illustrations and a Complete Concordance"
12:38 - Chapter 2. Perspectives on Robert Frost and T. S. Eliot
17:57 - Chapter 3. Perspectives on Wallace Stevens
21:05 - Chapter 4. Perspectives on Elizabeth Bishop, Marianne Moore and Hilda Doolittle
25:08 - Chapter 5. Perspectives on Ezra Pound and Hart Crane
35:38 - Chapter 6. Perspectives on W. H. Auden

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://oyc.yale.edu

This course was recorded in Spring 2007.

24. Elizabeth Bishop
00:47:18
YaleCourses
5 Views · 3 years ago

Modern Poetry (ENGL 310) with Langdon Hammer

The early poetry of Elizabeth Bishop is discussed. The poet is positioned as an endpoint to modernism, and in her essay "Dimensions for a Novel," a response to Eliot's "Tradition and the Individual Talent," Bishop is shown to transfer Eliot's concept of "tradition" to the construction of literary works. The poem "The Map" is presented as an expression of Bishop's early thinking about geography and world-making. "The Gentleman of Shalott" is considered as a contemplation of the process of perception. Finally, "Sandpiper" is read as a meditation on the challenges of locating coherence in a shifting world.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction: Elizabeth Bishop
11:09 - Chapter 2. Elizabeth Bishop Poem: "The Map"
30:05 - Chapter 3. Elizabeth Bishop Poem: "The Gentleman of Shalott"
40:57 - Chapter 4. Elizabeth Bishop Poem: "Sandpiper"

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://oyc.yale.edu

This course was recorded in Spring 2007.

23. W. H. Auden (cont.)
00:51:17
YaleCourses
9 Views · 3 years ago

Modern Poetry (ENGL 310) with Langdon Hammer

In this second lecture on W.H. Auden, the relationship between art and suffering is considered in Auden's treatment of Brueghel's "Fall of Icarus" in the poem "Musée des Beaux Arts." Auden's reflections on the place of art in society are explored in the elegies "In Memory of W.B. Yeats" and "In Memory of Sigmund Freud," where Freud's "talking cure" is recast as a model for poetry-making. Finally, "In Praise of Limestone" is considered as a late allegorical vision of a secular, non-transcendental earthly paradise.

00:00 - Chapter 1. W. H. Auden: Another Time
07:17 - Chapter 2. W. H. Auden Poem: "Musée des Beaux Arts"
18:44 - Chapter 3. W. H. Auden Poem: "In Memory of W. B. Yeats"
35:12 - Chapter 4. W. H. Auden Poem: "In Memory of Sigmund Freud"
46:08 - Chapter 5. W. H. Auden Poem: "In Praise of Limestone"

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://oyc.yale.edu

This course was recorded in Spring 2007.

22. W. H. Auden
00:44:39
YaleCourses
14 Views · 3 years ago

Modern Poetry (ENGL 310) with Langdon Hammer

This lecture presents the early poetry of W.H. Auden. In "From the Very First Coming Down," Auden's relationship to the reader is considered, as well as the role of economy, truth, and morality in his poetics. The political Auden is examined in "Spain" and "September 1, 1939," along with his later practice of revising controversial poems. Finally, his interest in traditional forms, his vision of love, and his characteristic perspectivism, are explored in "This Lunar Beauty" and "As I Walked Out One Evening."

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction: Wystan Hugh Auden
04:57 - Chapter 2. The Early W. H. Auden
12:08 - Chapter 3. W. H. Auden Poem: "From the Very First Coming Down"
20:39 - Chapter 4. W. H. Auden Poem: "Spain"
24:09 - Chapter 5. W. H. Auden Poem: "September 1, 1939"
30:58 - Chapter 6. W. H. Auden Poems: "This Lunar Beauty" and "Lullaby"
36:31 - Chapter 7. W. H. Auden Poem: "As I Walked Out One Evening"

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://oyc.yale.edu

This course was recorded in Spring 2007.

21. Wallace Stevens (cont.)
00:51:18
YaleCourses
9 Views · 3 years ago

Modern Poetry (ENGL 310) with Langdon Hammer

The late poetry of Wallace Stevens is presented and analyzed. Stevens's conception of the poet as reader and the world as a text to be read and translated is considered in "Large Red Man Reading" and "The Poem that Took the Place of a Mountain." The poet's preoccupation with natural cycles and sensory experience is exhibited in "The Plain Sense of Things." Finally, "A Primitive Like an Orb" is interpreted as Stevens's final vision of ceaseless change and transition in the world, in which the poet's verbal play participates.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction: Wallace Stevens's Late Poems
04:33 - Chapter 2. Wallace Stevens Poem: "Large Red Man Reading"
16:12 - Chapter 3. Wallace Stevens Poem: "The Poem that Took the Place of a Mountain"
25:18 - Chapter 4. Wallace Stevens Poem: "The Plain Sense of Things"
29:37 - Chapter 5. Wallace Stevens Poem: "Not Ideas About the Thing but the Thing Itself"
37:53 - Chapter 6. Wallace Stevens Poem: "A Primitive Like an Orb"

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://oyc.yale.edu

This course was recorded in Spring 2007.

20. Wallace Stevens (cont.)
00:50:22
YaleCourses
11 Views · 3 years ago

Modern Poetry (ENGL 310) with Langdon Hammer

Marie Borroff guest-lectures on Wallace Stevens's late seasonal poem, "The Auroras of Autumn." The poem is considered sequentially, beginning with Stevens's mythology of the three serpents in section one and concluding with an examination of the beauty of the world, as Stevens conceives of it, in sections eight through ten. The poet's optimism and fundamental belief in the power of imagination to divest death of its power is repeatedly demonstrated. The poem's final sections are shown to exemplify characteristically Stevensian conceptions of peace and happiness in the face of death.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction
02:10 - Chapter 2. Wallace Stevens Poem: "Gubbinal"
06:34 - Chapter 3. Wallace Stevens Volume: The Auroras of Autumn

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://oyc.yale.edu

This course was recorded in Spring 2007.

19. Wallace Stevens
00:51:10
YaleCourses
6 Views · 3 years ago

Modern Poetry (ENGL 310) with Langdon Hammer

Wallace Stevens is considered as an unapologetically Romantic poet of imagination. His search for meaning in a universe without religion in "Sunday Morning" is likened to Crane's energetic quest for meaning and symbol. In "The Poems of Our Climate," Stevens's desire to reduce poetry to essential terms, and then his countering resistance to this impulse, are explored. Finally, "The Man on the Dump" is considered as a typically Stevensian search for truth in specifically linguistic terms.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction: Wallace Stevens
09:22 - Chapter 2. Wallace Stevens Poem: "Sunday Morning"
30:27 - Chapter 3. Wallace Stevens Poem: "The Poems of Our Climate"
38:54 - Chapter 4. Wallace Stevens Poem: "The Man on the Dump"

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://oyc.yale.edu

This course was recorded in Spring 2007.

18. Marianne Moore (cont.)
00:42:45
YaleCourses
7 Views · 3 years ago

Modern Poetry (ENGL 310) with Langdon Hammer

The previous lecture's examination of "The Octopus" is continued, focusing on Moore's innovative use of quotation. The poem "Silence" is read in connection with nineteenth-century poetry and the poet's personal reticence. Selections from Elizabeth Bishop's personal memoir of Moore are presented with special attention to Moore's relationships with other modernists and male poets in particular. The poem "To a Snail" is considered as a meditation on style and compression, and a reading of "The Paper Nautilus" rounds out a wider examination of the use and meaning of restraint in Moore's poetry.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Marianne Moore Poem: "An Octopus"
12:48 - Chapter 2. Marianne Moore Poem: "Silence"
17:11 - Chapter 3. Marianne Moore and Her Complex Relationship to Her Male Peers
29:10 - Chapter 4. Marianne Moore Poem: "The Fish"
31:09 - Chapter 5. Marianne Moore Poem: "To a Snail"
32:28 - Chapter 6. Marianne Moore Poem: "When I Buy Pictures"
34:35 - Chapter 7. Marianne Moore Poem: "The Paper Nautilus"

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://oyc.yale.edu

This course was recorded in Spring 2007.

17. Marianne Moore
00:43:27
YaleCourses
11 Views · 3 years ago

Modern Poetry (ENGL 310) with Langdon Hammer

The poetry of Marianne Moore is considered alongside its preoccupations with gender, American culture, and nature. The poem "A Grave" is presented as characteristic of the prose rhythms and discursive manner of Moore's poems, including their use of expository language without meter or rhyme. The poem "England" is read as a defense of American culture, in opposition to the Eurocentricism of Eliot, Pound, and other modernists. In the poem "An Octopus," Moore makes use of excerpts from pamphlets and other unusual prose sources to suggest that inspiration is not limited to any one voice or to literary models.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Women in Modernist Literary Culture
07:00 - Chapter 2. Marianne Moore Poem: "A Grave"
28:23 - Chapter 3. Marianne Moore Poem: "England"
35:58 - Chapter 4. Marianne Moore Poem: "An Octopus"

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://oyc.yale.edu

This course was recorded in Spring 2007.

16. William Carlos Williams
00:48:27
YaleCourses
8 Views · 3 years ago

Modern Poetry (ENGL 310) with Langdon Hammer

The poetry of William Carlos Williams is presented and analyzed. His use of enjambment to surprise and transform is examined in order to highlight Williams's interest in depicting creative and cognitive processes. The Imagist qualities of much of Williams's poetry is considered alongside his engagement with modernist art--particularly the preoccupation of Duchamps and Cubist painters with the process of representing sensual perception. His free verse, which includes the innovative use of white space and carefully, visually balanced lines, establishes his position as one of the most visually-oriented poets in all of modernism.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction: William Carlos Williams
04:08 - Chapter 2. William Carlos Williams Poem: "The Red Wheelbarrow"
10:06 - Chapter 3. Free Verse and the Prologue to Kora in Hell
30:34 - Chapter 4. William Carlos Williams Poem: "The Great Figure"
38:21 - Chapter 5. William Carlos Williams Poem: "Spring and All"

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://oyc.yale.edu

This course was recorded in Spring 2007.

15. Langston Hughes
00:45:58
YaleCourses
10 Views · 3 years ago

Modern Poetry (ENGL 310) with Langdon Hammer

The poetry of Langston Hughes is considered as a representation of the African-American experience. The distinctive concerns of Hughes's poetic project are juxtaposed with the works of other modernists, such as Pound, Eliot, Frost, and Stevens. Hughes's interest in and innovative use of musical forms, such as blues and jazz, is explored with particular attention to their role in African-American culture, as well as their use by Hughes to forge an alternative to dominant modes of expression within the modernist canon.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Langston Hughes Poem: "The Negro Speaks of Rivers"
10:26 - Chapter 2. Black Voices in Modern Poetry
21:31 - Chapter 3. Continuities between Langston Hughes and Other Modern Poets
32:00 - Chapter 4. Langston Hughes Poem: "Song for a Dark Girl"
43:25 - Chapter 5. Langston Hughes Poem: "Life Is Fine"

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://oyc.yale.edu

This course was recorded in Spring 2007.

14. Hart Crane (cont.)
00:46:37
YaleCourses
8 Views · 3 years ago

Modern Poetry (ENGL 310) with Langdon Hammer

Hart Crane's masterwork The Bridge is positioned as a response to the modernist aesthetics of T.S. Eliot's The Waste Land. The visionary and specifically American aspects of the epic are stressed. Crane's interest in myth and symbol, his inclusion and treatment of marginal figures, and his refiguring of the American hero are considered alongside his unique perspective on the role of imagination in the creation and shaping of history.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Hart Crane Poem: "Voyages"
07:54 - Chapter 2. Hart Crane Poem: "The Bridge"

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://oyc.yale.edu

This course was recorded in Spring 2007.

13. Hart Crane
00:39:21
YaleCourses
12 Views · 3 years ago

Modern Poetry (ENGL 310) with Langdon Hammer

The early poetry of Hart Crane is presented and analyzed. Crane's self-characterization as a visionary, Romantic, and erotic poet, as well as the unique nature of his poetic project are considered as responses to Eliot's Waste Land and in particular the section "Death by Water." The poems "Legend," "Voyages," and "At Melville's Tomb" are read with particular attention to Crane's idiosyncratic use of language and neologism.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Hart Crane Poem: "Legend"
12:59 - Chapter 2. Hart Crane's Reading of Eliot's "The Waste Land"
20:55 - Chapter 3. Hart Crane Poem: "Voyages"

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://oyc.yale.edu

This course was recorded in Spring 2007.

12. T.S. Eliot (cont.)
00:49:59
YaleCourses
14 Views · 3 years ago

Modern Poetry (ENGL 310) with Langdon Hammer

In this lecture, Professor Hammer considers the psycho-sexual aspects of T.S. Eliot's, The Waste Land. The landscape of the poem is described and its key figures introduced. Particular emphasis is placed on couples and scenes of dialogue with aspects of romantic or sexual distress. At the lecture's conclusion, a broad summation of the individual units of the poem is presented, and the editing process, in particular Ezra Pound's contributions, is reflected upon.

00:00 - Chapter 1. T. S. Eliot Poem: "The Waste Land"
01:19 - Chapter 2. "The Waste Land": The Burial of the Dead
20:47 - Chapter 3. "The Waste Land": A Game of Chess
30:45 - Chapter 4. "The Waste Land": The Fire Sermon
43:07 - Chapter 5. "The Waste Land": What the Thunder Said

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://oyc.yale.edu

This course was recorded in Spring 2007.

11. T.S. Eliot (cont.)
00:50:00
YaleCourses
13 Views · 3 years ago

Modern Poetry (ENGL 310) with Langdon Hammer

Professor Hammer's discussion of "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock" continues with particular attention paid to the poem's psychological, social, and generic elements. Eliot's place in literary criticism and his modernist poetics are considered in the essay "The Metaphysical Poets." The essay's critique of Romanticism serves as a bridge to Eliot's masterwork, The Waste Land, the first lines of which are presented and analyzed.

00:00 - Chapter 1. The Psychological Dimensions of T. S. Eliot's Relationship to Literary Tradition
05:32 - Chapter 2. T. S. Eliot and the 'Invention of Tradition'
26:35 - Chapter 3. T. S. Eliot Poem: "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock"
33:42 - Chapter 4. T. S. Eliot Poem: "The Waste Land"

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://oyc.yale.edu

This course was recorded in Spring 2007.

10. T.S. Eliot
00:49:47
YaleCourses
14 Views · 3 years ago

Modern Poetry (ENGL 310) with Langdon Hammer

The early poetry of T.S. Eliot is examined. Differences between Pound and Eliot, in particular the former's interest in translation versus the latter's in quotation, are suggested. Eliot's relationship to tradition is considered in his essay, "Tradition and the Individual Talent." The early poem, "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock" is read, with emphasis on the poem's resistance to traditional forms and its complicated depiction of its speaker's fragmentary consciousness.

00:00 - Chapter 1. The Use of Quotations in Poetry
10:32 - Chapter 2. An Introduction to T. S. Eliot
25:00 - Chapter 3. T. S. Eliot Poem: "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock"

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://oyc.yale.edu

This course was recorded in Spring 2007.

9. Ezra Pound
00:52:04
YaleCourses
33 Views · 3 years ago

Modern Poetry (ENGL 310) with Langdon Hammer

The lecture introduces the poetry of Ezra Pound. Tensions in Pound's personality and career are considered, particularly in terms of his relationships with other poets and his fascism and anti-capitalism. The poem "The Seafarer" is examined as a quintessentially Poundian project in its treatment and translation of poetic forms. The first Canto of his epic project, The Cantos, is analyzed as a meditation on the process of expressing and engaging with history and literary tradition.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction: Ezra Pound
18:50 - Chapter 2. Ezra Pound Poem: "The Seafarer"
31:13 - Chapter 3. Ezra Pound Poem: "The Cantos"

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://oyc.yale.edu

This course was recorded in Spring 2007.

8. Imagism
00:46:16
YaleCourses
4 Views · 3 years ago

Modern Poetry (ENGL 310) with Langdon Hammer

The Imagist school is defined, in part through the prose of Ezra Pound. Representative examples of Imagist poetry are examined, particularly Hilda Doolittle's "Garden," "Sea Rose," and "Oread." Pound's early poem, "In a Station of the Metro," and Pound's comment on the poem's composition are studied as Imagist statements. His work with foreign languages, particularly Chinese, is considered in relation to Imagism in the poems "Jewel Stairs' Grievance" and "River Merchant's Wife: A Letter."

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction: Hilda Doolittle
08:23 - Chapter 2. What Was Imagism?
18:58 - Chapter 3. Hilda Doolittle Poems: "Garden" and "Sea Rose"
25:33 - Chapter 4. Hilda Doolittle Poem: "Oread"
32:29 - Chapter 5. Ezra Pound Poem: "In a Station of the Metro"
40:48 - Chapter 6. Li Po Poem Translation by Ezra Pound: "Jewel Stairs' Grievance"
43:09 - Chapter 7. Li Po Poem Translation by Ezra Pound: "River Merchant's Wife: A Letter"

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://oyc.yale.edu

This course was recorded in Spring 2007.

7. World War I Poetry in England
00:53:05
YaleCourses
15 Views · 3 years ago

Modern Poetry (ENGL 310) with Langdon Hammer

A representative sample of English poetry of World War One is surveyed. War rhetoric and propaganda are examined and challenged in Wilfred Owen's "Dulce et Decorum Est" and "Strange Meeting." The relationship between home front and battle front is explored in Thomas Hardy's "Channel Firing," "In the Time of 'the Breaking of Nations,'" and "I Looked up From My Writing"; Edward Thomas's "Adlestrop"; and Siegfried Sassoon's "'Blighters.'" Isaac Rosenberg's "Louse Hunting" is discussed as a poem of ordinary experience in the trenches.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Wilfred Owen Poem: "Dulce et Decorum Est"
15:39 - Chapter 2. Thomas Hardy Poem: "Channel Firing"
23:44 - Chapter 3. Thomas Hardy Poem: "In the Time of 'the Breaking of Nations"
26:24 - Chapter 4. Thomas Hardy Poem: "I Looked Up From My Writing"
29:10 - Chapter 5. Edward Thomas Poem: "Adlestrop"
38:21 - Chapter 6. Siegfried Sassoon Poem: "Blighters'"
41:09 - Chapter 7. Isaac Rosenberg Poem: "Louse Hunting"
48:10 - Chapter 8. Wilfred Owen Poem: "Strange Meeting"

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://oyc.yale.edu

This course was recorded in Spring 2007.

6. William Butler Yeats (cont.)
00:44:45
YaleCourses
7 Views · 3 years ago

Modern Poetry (ENGL 310) with Langdon Hammer

Yeats's late poetry is discussed and interpreted. The poet's interest in human knowledge and its relationship to the body, particularly the aging body, is traced from "Leda and the Swan" to "Sailing to Byzantium," "In Memory of Eva Gore-Booth and Con Markievicz," "Two Songs from a Play," and "Vacillation." Yeats's late interest in the experiences of joy, madness, and "gaiety" is examined in "Crazy Jane Talks with the Bishop." Yeats's de-mystifying attitude toward art in "The Circus Animals' Destruction" is contrasted with his celebration of art in "Lapis Lazuli."

00:00 - Chapter 1. Yeats on the Subject of Magic and an Introduction to Yeats's Late Poems
15:02 - Chapter 2. W. B. Yeats Poem: "In Memory of Eva Gore-Booth and Con Markievicz"
25:15 - Chapter 3. W. B. Yeats Poem: "Two Songs from a Play"
27:29 - Chapter 4. W. B. Yeats Poem: "Vacillation"
34:47 - Chapter 5. W. B. Yeats Poem: "Crazy Jane Talks With the Bishop"
42:06 - Chapter 6. W. B. Yeats Poem: "Lapis Lazuli"

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://oyc.yale.edu

This course was recorded in Spring 2007.

5. William Butler Yeats (cont.)
00:48:04
YaleCourses
7 Views · 3 years ago

Modern Poetry (ENGL 310) with Langdon Hammer

Yeats's middle period is explored, beginning with the middle-aged Yeats's assumption of the role of spokesman for Irish nationalism and the development of his complicated response to nationalist violence. The aestheticization of violence is considered in the poem "Easter, 1916" and briefly in "The Statues." Yeats's conception of the relationship of violence to history, with particular emphasis on the frightening interaction among the divine, the human, and the bestial, is demonstrated in the visionary poems "The Second Coming" and "The Magi," and finally in "Leda and the Swan."

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction
07:52 - Chapter 2. W. B. Yeats Poem: "Easter, 1916"
23:15 - Chapter 3. W. B. Yeats and History
28:47 - Chapter 4. W. B. Yeats Poem: "The Second Coming"
34:40 - Chapter 5. W. B. Yeats Poem: "The Magi"
37:55 - Chapter 6. W. B. Yeats Poem: "Leda and the Swan"

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://oyc.yale.edu

This course was recorded in Spring 2007.

4. William Butler Yeats
00:45:43
YaleCourses
4 Views · 3 years ago

Modern Poetry (ENGL 310) with Langdon Hammer

The early poetry of William Butler Yeats is read and interpreted with particular attention paid to Yeats's ambitions as a specifically Irish poet. Yeats's commitment to a poetry of symbol is explored in "The Song of the Wandering Aengus," a fable of poetic vocation. "A Coat," composed at the end of Yeats's struggle to bring about an Irish national theater, shows the poet reconceiving his style and in search of a new audience. "The Fisherman" is read as a revision of "The Song of the Wandering Aengus" which reflects this new set of concerns.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction: William Butler Yeats
06:28 - Chapter 2. W. B. Yeats and King Goll
14:41 - Chapter 3. W. B. Yeats Poem: "The Song of the Wandering Aengus"
27:01 - Chapter 4. W. B. Yeats Poem: "A Coat"
32:45 - Chapter 5. W. B. Yeats Poem: "The Fisherman"

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://oyc.yale.edu

This course was recorded in Spring 2007.

3. Robert Frost (cont.)
00:50:06
YaleCourses
26 Views · 3 years ago

Modern Poetry (ENGL 310) with Langdon Hammer

In this second lecture on the poetry of Robert Frost, the poet's use of iambic pentameter in "Birches" is discussed. Frost's anti-modernity is evidenced in his interest in rural New England culture and his concern with the lives of laborers in "Home Burial." The failure of humanity to work real change is sardonically depicted in "Provide, Provide," but a hopeful vision of the power of imagination is presented in the final lines of the late poem, "Directive."

00:00 - Chapter 1. What Is Meter?
03:55 - Chapter 2. Robert Frost Poem: "Birches"
27:33 - Chapter 3. Where Did Frost Go to Write Poetry?
30:56 - Chapter 4. Robert Frost Poem: "Home Burial"
45:21 - Chapter 5. Robert Frost Poem: "Directive"

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://oyc.yale.edu

This course was recorded in Spring 2007.

2. Robert Frost
00:46:06
YaleCourses
20 Views · 3 years ago

Modern Poetry (ENGL 310) with Langdon Hammer

1. Introduction
00:47:27
YaleCourses
15 Views · 3 years ago

Modern Poetry (ENGL 310) with Langdon Hammer

Professor Hammer introduces students to the material that will be covered in the course of the semester. Course readings and requirements are also addressed. Early publications of poems are discussed as they appeared in small magazines such as Blast, Broom, and The Criterion. Book publication of the same poems and other poetry collections are then discussed in contrast. A number of modern English poets are presented such as Eliot, Hughes, Moore, Yeats, and photographs are shown in order to introduce students to the major poets of the early twentieth century.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction: Course Materials and Requirements
05:50 - Chapter 2. Modern Poet Introduction: Robert Frost
08:46 - Chapter 3. Modern Poet Introductions: T. S. Eliot and Marianne Moore
42:52 - Chapter 4. Modern Poet Introduction: Wallace Stevens

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://oyc.yale.edu

This course was recorded in Spring 2007.

Lecture 24. Alternative Visions: Esther, Ruth, and Jonah
00:28:55
YaleCourses
13 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

In this lecture, two final books of the Bible are examined and their attitudes towards foreign nations compared. In contrast to Daniel's reliance on divine intervention to punish the wicked, the book of Esther focuses on human initiative in defeating the enemies of Israel. Finally, the book of Jonah--in which the wicked Assyrians repent and are spared divine punishment--expresses the view that God is compassionate and concerned with all creation. Professor Hayes concludes the course with remarks regarding the dynamic and complex messages presented in the Hebrew Bible.

00:00 - Chapter 1. The Book of Esther
09:29 - Chapter 2. The Book of Jonah
20:32 - Chapter 3. Concluding Remarks about the Dynamic and Complex Messages in the Hebrew Bible

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://oyc.yale.edu

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

Lecture 23. Visions of the End: Daniel and Apocalyptic Literature
00:49:51
YaleCourses
15 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

The Book of Ruth, in which a foreign woman enters the community of Israel and becomes great-grandmother to none other than King David, expresses a view of gentiles entirely opposed to that of Ezra and Nehemiah. Other prophets of the Restoration period are discussed, including Third Isaiah who also envisions other nations joining Israel in the worship of Yahweh. This period also sees the rise of apocalyptic literature in works like Zechariah, Joel and Daniel. Written during a period of persecution in the 2nd c. BCE the book of Daniel contains many features and themes of apocalyptic literature, including an eschatology according to which God dramatically intervenes in human history, destroying the wicked (understood as other nations) and saving the righteous (understood as Israel).

00:00 - Chapter 1. The Book of Ruth
11:58 - Chapter 2. The Last Prophetic Books
23:05 - Chapter 3. Features of Apocalyptic Literature
29:11 - Chapter 4. Apocalyptic Passages in Post-Exilic Books
35:21 - Chapter 5. The Book of Daniel, Chapters 1-6
42:36 - Chapter 6. The Book of Daniel, Chapters 7-12

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://oyc.yale.edu

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

Lecture 22. The Restoration: 1 and 2 Chronicles, Ezra and Nehemiah
00:49:18
YaleCourses
7 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

This lecture continues the discussion of the psalms, and the genres and forms in which they appear, such as psalms of praise and thanksgiving, divine kingship, lament and petition, blessing and cursing, or wisdom. Another poetic book of the Bible is the Song of Songs, an erotic work the sexually explicit content of which has been piously reinterpreted over the centuries. The second half of the lecture turns to the period of the Restoration when the Judean exiles returned to what was now the province of Yehud under Cyrus, the Persian ruler. The books of 1 and 2 Chronicles refer to some of the events of this time as well as the books of Ezra and Nehemiah. Ezra and Nehemiah are said to renew the Mosaic covenant with the Torah at its center, and to institute a number of social and religious reforms (including a universal ban on intermarriage that will ultimately fail) in order to consolidate the struggling community.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Additional Forms and Genres in the Book of Psalms
10:30 - Chapter 2. Song of Songs
14:38 - Chapter 3. The Restoration and the Books of Chronicles I and II, Ezra and Nehemiah
30:10 - Chapter 4. Ezra's Dissolution of Foreign Marriages and Renewal of the Covenant
42:29 - Chapter 5. The Calamities as Cautionary Tales in the Books of Ezra and Nehemiah

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://oyc.yale.edu

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

Lecture 21. Biblical Poetry: Psalms and Song of Songs
00:48:40
YaleCourses
9 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

After a detailed explanation of the requirements for the paper assignment, Professor Hayes turns to the Writings - the third section of the Bible - and considers a recent approach to the study of the Bible, called canonical criticism. The books in this section of the Bible explore various questions associated with suffering and evil. An example is the book of Ecclesiastes which constitutes a second attack on the optimism and piety of conventional religious thinking. The lecture concludes with a discussion of a number of Psalms, their genre, purpose, and language.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Remarks for Final Paper
08:37 - Chapter 2. The Problem of Dating; Canonical Criticism
13:18 - Chapter 3. The Book of Ecclesiastes
25:52 - Chapter 4. Introduction to the Book of Psalms
34:40 - Chapter 5. Themes and Formal Characteristics in the Book of Psalms

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://oyc.yale.edu

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

Lecture 20. Responses to Suffering and Evil: Lamentations and Wisdom Literature
00:52:53
YaleCourses
12 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

This lecture begins with the Book of Lamentations, a short book of dirges that laments the destruction of Jerusalem and moves on to introduce the third and final section of the Hebrew Bible - the Ketuvim, or "Writings." This section of the Bible contains three books that exemplify the ancient Near Eastern literary genre of "Wisdom" -- Proverbs, Job and Ecclesiastes. Proverbs reinforces the Deuteronomistic idea of divine retributive justice according to which the good prosper and the evil are punished. The conventional assumption of a moral world order is attacked in the Book of Job. The book explores whether people will sustain virtue when suffering and afflicted, and brings charges of negligence and mismanagement against God for failing to punish the wicked and allowing the righteous to suffer.

00:00 - Chapter 1. The Book of Lamentations
08:31 - Chapter 2. An Introduction to Wisdom Books in the "Ketuvim"
13:19 - Chapter 3. The Book of Proverbs
19:48 - Chapter 4. Structure of and Literary Components in The Book of Job
25:40 - Chapter 5. Prose Prologue in the Book of Job
30:36 - Chapter 6. Poetic Speech Cycles in the Book of Job
45:26 - Chapter 7. God's Response in the Book of Job

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://oyc.yale.edu

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

Lecture 19. Literary Prophecy: Perspectives on the Exile (Jeremiah, Ezekiel and 2nd Isaiah)
00:47:07
YaleCourses
9 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

The destruction of Jerusalem challenged the faith of the nation. What was the meaning of this event and how could such tremendous evil and suffering be reconciled with the nature of God himself? Professor Hayes shows how Israel's prophets attempted to answer this question, turning the nation's defeat and despair into an occasion for renewing faith in Israel's God. The lecture continues with an in-depth study of the book of Ezekiel. Ezekiel's denunciations of Jerusalem are among the most lurid and violent in the Bible and he concludes that destruction is the only possible remedy. Ezekiel's visions include God's withdrawal from Jerusalem to be with his people in exile, and his ultimate return. Ezekiel's use of dramatic prophetic signs, his rejection of collective divine punishment and assertion of individual responsibility are discussed. The last part of the lecture turns to Second Isaiah and the famous "servant songs" that find a universal significance in Israel's suffering.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Structure and Tone of the Book of Ezekiel
09:53 - Chapter 2. Ezekiel's Denunciations of Jerusalem and Rejection of Collective Punishment
17:54 - Chapter 3. The Sometimes Contradictory Nature of the Biblical Text
21:39 - Chapter 4. Ezekiel's Interpretation of the Final Destruction of Jerusalem
31:58 - Chapter 5.Major Themes in Second Isaiah
38:00 - Chapter 6. Second Isaiah's Servant Songs

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://oyc.yale.edu

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

Lecture 18. Literary Prophecy: Micah, Zephaniah, Nahum and Habbakuk
00:48:40
YaleCourses
10 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

Micah, eighth-century southern prophet and contemporary of Isaiah, is discussed. Structurally, the book of Micah alternates three prophecies of doom and destruction and three prophecies of hope and restoration. Micah attacks the doctrine of the inviolability of Zion and employs the literary form of a covenant lawsuit (or riv) in his denunciation of the nation. Several short prophetic books are also discussed: Zephaniah; the Book of Nahum, depicting the downfall of Assyria and distinguished for its vivid poetic style; and the book of Habbakuk, which contains philosophical musings on God's behavior. The final part of the lecture turns to the lengthy book of Jeremiah. A prophet at the time of the destruction and exile, Jeremiah predicted an end to the exile after 70 years and a new covenant that would be inscribed on the hearts of the nation.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Structure of the Book of Micah
05:26 - Chapter 2. Common Paradoxes in Prophetic Writings
10:40 - Chapter 3. The Book of Zephaniah
14:37 - Chapter 4. The Book of Nahum
19:46 - Chapter 5. The Book of Habakkuk
24:52 - Chapter 6. Structure and Features of the Book of Jeremiah
39:11 - Chapter 7. Unique Features of Jeremiah's Message of Consolation

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://oyc.yale.edu

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

Lecture 17. Literary Prophecy: Hosea and Isaiah
00:48:58
YaleCourses
13 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

The lecture focuses on the eighth-century northern prophet Hosea, a linguistically difficult book set against the backdrop of the expansionist Assyrian Empire. Hosea's marriage symbolizes Israel's relationship with God and serves to remind Israel of God's forbearance and Israel's obligations and pledge to loyalty under the covenant at Sinai. The second half of the lecture shifts to Isaiah and his emphasis on the Davidic Covenant, rather than the Mosaic one, a key distinction between him and Hosea. Themes in Isaiah include the salvation of a remnant, Israel's election to a mission and an eschatology that centers around a "messiah" (anointed) king of the house of David.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Historical Background for and Major Themes of the Book of Hosea
13:29 - Chapter 2. Doom and Hope as Two Conceptions of Covenant
18:00 - Chapter 3. Historical Background for and Structure of the Book of Isaiah
25:55 - Chapter 4. Emphasis on the Davidic Covenant
36:47 - Chapter 5. Major Themes in the Book of Isaiah

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://oyc.yale.edu

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

Lecture 16. Literary Prophecy: Amos
00:48:00
YaleCourses
14 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

This lecture introduces the literary prophets of both the northern and southern kingdoms. The prophetic books are anthologies of oracles the sequence of which is often determined by literary rather than chronological considerations. This lecture studies the literary features and major themes of classical Israelite prophecy as evidenced in particular in the book of the eighth-century northern prophet Amos. The prophets denounced moral decay and false piety as directly responsible for the social injustice that outrages God. While the Deuteronomist blames the nation's misfortunes on acts of idolatry, the prophets stress that the nation will be punished for everyday incidents of immorality. The literary prophets counterbalance their warnings with messages of great hope and consolation.

00:00 - Chapter 1. An Introduction to the Literary Prophets
05:32 - Chapter 2. Structure of and Literary Features in the Book of Amos
22:29 - Chapter 3. Major Themes in the Book of Amos
33:51 - Chapter 4. Differences between Deuteronomistic and Prophetic Interpretations of Israel's History

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://oyc.yale.edu

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

Lecture 15. Hebrew Prophecy: The Non-Literary Prophets
00:49:51
YaleCourses
10 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

This lecture concludes the discussion of the Deuteronomistic historian's efforts to show that idolatry and associated sins lead to God's wrath and periods of trouble. The remainder of the lecture is an introduction to the phenomenon of Israelite prophecy which included ecstatic prophecy and prophetic guilds. The non-literary prophets of the historical books of the Bible and their various roles (as God's zealot; as conscience of the king) are examined.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Concluding Remarks about the Deuteronomistic Historian
08:33 - Chapter 2. Introduction to the Phenomenon of Israelite Prophecy
21:25 - Chapter 3. Roles Played by Prophets: Yes Men Versus True Prophets
28:20 - Chapter 4. Roles Played by Prophets: God's Zealots, Kingmakers, King-Breakers and Miracle Workers
43:01 - Chapter 5. Roles Played by Prophets: Conscience of the King

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://oyc.yale.edu

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

Lecture 14. The Deuteronomistic History: Response to Catastrophe (1 and 2 Kings)
00:51:35
YaleCourses
13 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

The tension between covenant theology, emphasizing the conditional Mosaic convenant from Mt. Sinai, and royal theology emphasizing the unconditional covenant with David in his palace on Mt. Zion, is traced. Following Solomon's death, the united kingdom separated into a northern and a southern kingdom (named Israel and Judah respectively), the former falling to the Assyrians in 722 and the latter to the Babylonians in 586. Analysis of the Deuteronomistic School's response to these historical crises and subsequent exile to Babylonia is evidenced through redaction criticism.

00:00 - Chapter 1. The Uncompromising Honesty of the Story of David
10:29 - Chapter 2. Tensions in Kings I and II
31:21 - Chapter 3. The Separation of the Kingdom Following Solomon's Death
42:10 - Chapter 4. Historiosophy of the Deuteronomistic School

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://oyc.yale.edu

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

Lecture 13. The Deuteronomistic History: Prophets and Kings (1 and 2 Samuel)
00:49:32
YaleCourses
11 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

The transition from a tribal society under the leadership of elders and eventually charismatic "judges" to a nation under a monarch is traced through the books of Judges and 1 and 2 Samuel. Early stories of local heroes are woven together into a larger history that conforms to the exilic perspectives of the Deuteronomistic School. An extended look at representations of Saul and David (including God's covenant with David) reveal historical shifts and some ambivalence about monarchy and the ideal form of leadership.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Distinguishing between Israelis and Israelites
01:53 - Chapter 2. An Alliance of Tribes
05:46 - Chapter 3. The Book of Judges
23:05 - Chapter 4. Samuel, a Transition Figure and the Last in a Line of Prophet Judges
32:46 - Chapter 5. Saul and David as Representations of Ambivalence about Monarchy
45:14 - Chapter 6. The Davidic Covenant

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://oyc.yale.edu

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

Lecture 12. The Deuteronomistic History: Life in the Land (Joshua and Judges)
00:50:19
YaleCourses
10 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

This lecture concludes the study of Deuteronomy and traces the contribution of the Deuteronomistic School: a historiosophy according to which Israel's fortunes are dependent upon and an indicator of her fidelity to the covenant. The books of the Former Prophets are introduced with attention to their historical and geographical context. The book of Joshua's account of Israel's conquest of Canaan is contrasted with scholarly accounts of Israel's emergence in Canaan and formation as a nation state.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Deuteronomy: A Capstone to the Pentateuchal Narrative
06:05 - Chapter 2. Source Theory and the Pentateuch
13:26 - Chapter 3. Introduction to the Former Prophets
21:54 - Chapter 4. Geographical Setting and Its Historical Implications
27:39 - Chapter 5. Structure of Joshua
34:29 - Chapter 6. Three Scholarly Models for the Emergence of the Nation State of Israel

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://oyc.yale.edu

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

Lecture 11. On the Steps of Moab: Deuteronomy
00:47:55
YaleCourses
7 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

This lecture, focusing on Moses's final address to the Israelites and transfer of authority to Joshua, describes Moses as the paradigmatic leader of biblical tradition. The structure of Deuteronomy is then outlined. Attention is given to updated and revised laws within Deuteronomy which exemplify the activity of adaptive interpretation of earlier tradition. The main themes of Deuteronomy are presented and include the notion of God's chosen people and chosen city, social justice, covenantal love and the centralization of cultic worship.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Moses as the Paradigmatic Leader of Biblical Tradition
08:46 - Chapter 2. Basic Structure of Deuteronomy
22:16 - Chapter 3. Updated and Revised Laws According to New Ideas
37:31 - Chapter 4. Major Themes in Deuteronomy

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://oyc.yale.edu

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

Lecture 10. Biblical Law: The Three Legal Corpora of JE (Exodus), P (Leviticus and Numbers) and D
00:50:43
YaleCourses
10 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

This lecture introduces biblical law in a comparative approach that identifies similarities and differences between Israelite law and other Ancient Near Eastern legal traditions, such as the Code of Hammurabi. Distinctive features of Israelite law are explained as flowing from the claim of divine authorship.

00:00 - Chapter 1. The Initiation of God's Laws, Rules and Ordinances at Sinai
03:38 - Chapter 2. The Decalogues
11:42 - Chapter 3. Biblical Law in Comparison with Ancient Near East Legal Collections
29:58 - Chapter 4. Radical, Characteristic Features of Israelite Law
40:17 - Chapter 5. Reversing the Code: Sanctity of Human Life

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://oyc.yale.edu

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

Lecture 9. The Priestly Legacy: Cult and Sacrifice, Purity and Holiness in Leviticus and Numbers
00:48:35
YaleCourses
18 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

In this lecture, the Priestly source (P) found primarily in Leviticus and Numbers is introduced. The symbolism of the sacrificial cult and purity system, the differences between moral and ritual impurity, as well as holiness and purity are explained within the Priestly context. The concept of holiness and imitatio dei, or human imitation of God, is explained.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction to the Israelite Sanctuary
09:19 - Chapter 2. The Priestly Conceptions of Holiness and Time
13:36 - Chapter 3. Holiness, Purity, Moral and Ritual Impurity
23:30 - Chapter 4. Ritual Purification, Sacrifices and Offerings, and "Imitatio Dei"
29:13 - Chapter 5. Moral Impurity, Defiling the Land and Purification
42:34 - Chapter 6. Dietary Law and the Holiness Code

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://oyc.yale.edu

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

Lecture 8. Exodus: From Egypt to Sinai (Exodus 5-24, 32; Numbers)
00:47:35
YaleCourses
7 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

This lecture traces the account of the Exodus (and the origin of the Passover festival as a historicization of older nature festivals) and Israel's liberation from bondage under Pharaoh. The story reaches its climax with the covenant concluded between God and Israel through Moses at Sinai. Drawing heavily on the work of Jon Levenson, the lecture examines Ancient Near Eastern parallels to the Sinaitic covenant and describes the divine-human relationship (an intersection of law and love) that the covenant seeks to express.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Passover as a Historicization of Earlier Ritual Practices
06:51 - Chapter 2. The Exodus as a Paradigm for Collective Salvation
19:59 - Chapter 3. The Mosaic Covenant between God and Israel at Sinai
39:15 - Chapter 4. Patience with the Israelites: Towards the Promised Land

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://oyc.yale.edu

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

Lecture 7. Israel in Egypt: Moses and the Beginning of Yahwism (Genesis 37- Exodus 4)
00:46:03
YaleCourses
18 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

The book of Genesis concludes with the story of Joseph and the descent of the 12 tribes into Egypt, setting the stage for the Exodus in which God is seen as redeemer and liberator. Moses is the first in a line of apostolic (messenger) prophets and Yahwism is initiated. Mark Smith's thesis describing the emergence of Israelite religion through a process of convergence and divergence is presented as an alternative to the evolutionary-revolutionary dichotomy presented in Lecture 2.

00:00 - Chapter 1. One Who Wrestles: The Significance of Jacob's Name Change
03:04 - Chapter 2. The 12 Sons of Jacob: Joseph and His Brothers
10:06 - Chapter 3. Exodus: Sequel to Genesis and Myth of Origins for a Nation
21:14 - Chapter 4. Moses's Legendary Birth Story and Early Life
26:43 - Chapter 5. Descriptions of God in the Bible
38:39 - Chapter 6. Smith's Convergence and Divergence Model

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://oyc.yale.edu

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

Lecture 6. Biblical Narrative: The Stories of the Patriarchs (Genesis 12-36)
00:49:17
YaleCourses
11 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

This lecture continues with a review of scholarly views on the historical accuracy of the Bible. The narratives of the patriarchs and matriarchs are introduced and the covenant between Abraham and God--which ultimately leads to the formation of a nation--is explained. Central themes of the patriarchal stories include: God's call to Abraham, God's promise of a blessed and fruitful nation, threats to this promise (including the story of the binding of Isaac for sacrifice). Finally, after a significant character transformation, the third patriarch Jacob becomes Yisrael ("he who struggles with God").

00:00 - Chapter 1. Scholarly Opinion on the Historical Accuracy of the Bible
13:05 - Chapter 2. Divine Command and Divine Promise: Truths Freed from the Burden of Historicity
20:06 - Chapter 3. The Covenant between God and Abraham
25:38 - Chapter 4. The Story of Isaac
39:12 - chapter 5. Jacob the Trickster

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://oyc.yale.edu

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

Lecture 5. Critical Approaches to the Bible: Introduction to Genesis 12-50
00:48:45
YaleCourses
4 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

This lecture introduces the modern critical study of the Bible, including source theories and Wellhausen's Documentary Hypothesis, as well as form criticism and tradition criticism. The main characteristics of each biblical source (J, E, P, and D) according to classic source theory are explained. This lecture also raises the question of the historical accuracy of the Bible and the relation of archaeology to the biblical record.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Wellhausen's Documentary Hypothesis and Characteristics of Biblical Sources
16:05 - Chapter 2. The Purpose of Literary, Source and Historical Criticism
27:15 - Chapter 3. The Generations of the Patriarchs and Matriarchs
34:42 - Chapter 4. Critical Methodology Used in Biblical Scholarship

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://oyc.yale.edu

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

Lecture 4. Doublets and Contradictions, Seams and Sources
00:47:53
YaleCourses
7 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

This lecture continues the discussion on Genesis, including the familiar accounts of Cain and Abel, the Flood and Noahide covenant. The story of Cain and Abel expresses the notion of the God-endowed sanctity of human life and a "universal moral law" governing the world. Examination of the contradictions and doublets in the flood story leads to a discussion of the complex composition and authorship of the Pentateuch. These features as well as anachronisms challenge traditional religious convictions of Moses as the author of the first five books of the Bible.

00:00 - Chapter 1. The Taming of Enkidu in The "Epic of Gilgamesh"
05:44 - The Story of Enkidu as Parallel to the Second Story of Creation in Genesis
21:29 - Major Themes in the Story of Cain and Abel
24:02 - Comparing Mesopotamian, Semitic and Israelite Flood Stories
35:32 - Contradictions and Doublets in the Flood Story in Genesis 6-9
42:42 - Implications of the Repetitions and Contradictions throughout the Bible

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://oyc.yale.edu

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

Lecture 3. The Hebrew Bible in Its Ancient Near Eastern Setting: Genesis 1-4 in Context
00:47:43
YaleCourses
13 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

In the first of a series of lectures on the book of Genesis, the basic elements of biblical monotheism are compared with Ancient Near Eastern texts to show a non-mythological, non-theogonic conception of the deity, a new conception of the purpose and meaning of human life, nature, magic and myth, sin and evil, ethics (including the universal moral law) and history. The two creation stories are explored and the work of Nahum Sarna is introduced.

00:00 - Chapter 1. The Creation Story in "Enuma Elish"
12:44 - Chapter 2. The Creation Stories in Genesis
28:30 - Chapter 3. Creation as God Imposing Order on the World
38:17 - Allusion to and Resonances of Ancient Near Eastern Themes

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://oyc.yale.edu

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

Lecture 2. The Hebrew Bible in Its Ancient Near Eastern Setting: Biblical Religion in Context
00:46:12
YaleCourses
8 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

In this lecture, the Hebrew Bible is understood against the background of Ancient Near Eastern culture. Drawing from and critiquing the work of Yehezkel Kaufmann, the lecture compares the religion of the Hebrew Bible with the cultures of the Ancient Near East. Two models of development are discussed: an evolutionary model of development in which the Hebrew Bible is continuous with Ancient Near Eastern culture and a revolutionary model of development in which the Israelite religion is radically discontinuous with Ancient Near Eastern culture. At stake in this debate is whether the religion of the Hebrew Bible is really the religion of ancient Israel.

00:00 - Chapter 1. The Bible as a Product of Religious and Cultural Revolution
08:16 - Chapter 2. Kaufman's Characterization of "Pagan Religion"
22:16 - Chapter 3. Kaufman's Characterization of One Sovereign God
35:13 - Chapter 4. Continuity or Radical Break?

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://oyc.yale.edu

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

Lecture 1. The Parts of the Whole
00:45:46
YaleCourses
7 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

This lecture provides an introduction to the literature of the Hebrew Bible and its structure and contents. Common misconceptions about the Bible are dispelled: the Bible is a library of books from diverse times and places rather than a single, unified book; biblical narratives contain complex themes and realistic characters and are not "pious parables" about saintly persons; the Bible is a literarily sophisticated narrative not for children; the Bible is an account of the odyssey of a people rather than a book of theology; and finally, the Bible was written by many human contributors with diverse perspectives and viewpoints.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction to the Hebrew Bible and Its Radical Ideas
16:10 - Chapter 2. Common Myths about the Bible
29:33 - Chapter 3. An Overview of the Structure of the Bible
40:17 - Chapter 4. Course Organization

Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu


This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

Lecture 23. Review of Musical Style
00:47:10
YaleCourses
16 Views · 3 years ago

Listening to Music (MUSI 112)

This review session teaches students how to identify the various time periods of Western music history, through careful listening and close attention to the musical-stylistic characteristics of a given piece. Professor Wright plays several musical examples culled from different historical periods, and then guides the students in identifying a variety of musical features that can be used to figure out approximately when the music was written.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction
03:49 - Chapter 2. Identifying Different Musical Styles
17:44 - Chapter 3. Review of Gregorian Chants
22:56 - Chapter 4. Listening Exercises for Modernist and Classical Music
32:25 - Chapter 5. Distinguishing Classical and Romantic Music
41:29 - Chapter 6. Final Exercise and Conclusion

Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu


This course was recorded in Fall 2008.

Lecture 22. Modernism and Mahler
00:46:18
YaleCourses
15 Views · 3 years ago

Listening to Music (MUSI 112)

In this final formal lecture of the course, Professor Wright discusses Modernism, focusing on Stravinsky's The Rite of Spring. He explores several musical reasons why The Rite of Spring caused a riot at its 1913 Paris premiere. Professor Wright then goes on to share with the class one of his favorite pieces, by Gustav Mahler, the orchestral Lied "Ich bin der Welt abhanden gekommen." After an enumeration of this piece's qualities, Professor Wright ends the class with a paean to classical music and an exhortation to all to preserve this great tradition.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction to Modernism: Elements in Stravinsky's Ballet Scores
08:14 - Chapter 2. Creating the Dissonance and Irregularities in Rites of Spring
20:26 - Chapter 3. Mahler's "Ich bin der Welt abhanden gekommen": An Exploration
46:43 - Chapter 4. The Values of Saving Classical Music and Conclusion

Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu


This course was recorded in Fall 2008.

Lecture 21. Musical Impressionism and Exoticism: Debussy, Ravel and Monet
00:52:03
YaleCourses
5 Views · 3 years ago

Listening to Music (MUSI 112)

In this lecture, Professor Wright teaches the students about musical Impressionism. While his discussion focuses on the music of Claude Debussy and Maurice Ravel, he nonetheless draws examples from other composers, as well as painters and poets who worked with a similar aesthetic style during the same time period. The class concludes with a performance of Ravel's "Ondine" by guest pianist Naomi Woo.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction to Musical Impressionism
09:00 - Chapter 2. Debussy's Musical Responses to Mallarme's Poetry
27:00 - Chapter 3. La Cathedrale Engloutie -- Interactions between Impressionist Painters and Musicians
35:18 - Chapter 4. Ravel's Ondine: A Violin Performance by Naomi Woo

Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu


This course was recorded in Fall 2008.

Lecture 20. The Colossal Symphony: Beethoven, Berlioz, Mahler and Shostakovich
00:51:54
YaleCourses
8 Views · 3 years ago

Listening to Music (MUSI 112)

The history and development of the symphony is the topic of this lecture. Professor Wright leads the students from Mozart to Mahler, discussing the ways in which the genre of symphonic music changed throughout the nineteenth century, as well as the ways in which the make-up of the symphony orchestra itself evolved during this period. The changes in the nature of orchestral music are contextualized within the broader historical changes taking place in Europe in the nineteenth century. The lecture is supplemented with musical excerpts drawn from Mozart, Tchaikovsky, Dvorak, Wagner, and Mahler.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction to Symphonies
08:52 - Chapter 2. Historical Changes in Strings and Woodwind Instruments
15:27 - Chapter 3. The Development of the Brass Family
23:22 - Chapter 4. The Growing Orchestra: Capacities and Limits in the 19th Century
29:52 - Chapter 5. Accommodating Orchestras: The Advent of Concert Halls
35:27 - Chapter 6. Gustav Mahler, the Symphony Composer
47:33 - Chapter 7. Conclusion

Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu


This course was recorded in Fall 2008.

Lecture 19. Romantic Opera: Verdi's La Traviata, Bocelli, Pavarotti and Domingo
00:52:40
YaleCourses
15 Views · 3 years ago

Listening to Music (MUSI 112)

This lecture focuses on opera and the operatic voice, from the Romantic period to the present. Professor Wright integrates a discussion of one of the most often-performed and famous operas in the Western canon, Verdi's La Traviata, with a discussion of vocal performance practice. For the latter, he uses recordings of singers from the early to late twentieth century as examples of different types of voices and the ways in which aesthetic values about the voice have changed throughout the past hundred years.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction to Opera
05:08 - Chapter 2. Verdi's La Traviata: The First Aria
19:36 - Chapter 3. The Scena in Opera
26:59 - Chapter 4. Critical Assessment of Vocal Performance
33:06 - Chapter 5. Major Opera Singers of the 20th and 21st Centuries

Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu


This course was recorded in Fall 2008.

Lecture 18. Piano Music of Mozart and Beethoven
00:49:56
YaleCourses
9 Views · 3 years ago

Listening to Music (MUSI 112)

This lecture addresses the history of the modern piano and its music. Undertaking a detailed discussion of the different forms of the piano from the early eighteenth through twentieth centuries, Professor Wright also shows how the instrument evolved through a variety of photographs and paintings. He further supplements the lecture by playing recordings that were made on the pianos actually owned by such composers as Mozart and Beethoven. The lecture ends with a guest piano performance by Yale undergraduate Daniel Schlossberg, Jr.

00:00 - Chapter 1. The History of the Piano -- The Harpsichord
02:25 - Chapter 2. Mozart's Exploration of the Pianoforte
13:31 - Chapter 3. Beethoven's Music for his Broadwood Piano
23:43 - Chapter 4. Increasing Range and Power -- The Graf Piano, Liszt, and Wagner
35:30 - Chapter 5. Guest Piano Performance by Daniel Scholssberg, Jr.

Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu


This course was recorded in Fall 2008.

Lecture 17. Mozart and His Operas
00:51:38
YaleCourses
7 Views · 3 years ago

Listening to Music (MUSI 112)

Lecture 16. Baroque Music: The Vocal Music of Johann Sebastian Bach
00:48:37
YaleCourses
10 Views · 3 years ago

Listening to Music (MUSI 112)

In this lecture, Professor Wright discusses the Baroque period through a detailed look at the life and music of Johann Sebastian Bach. He first takes the students through the basics of Bach's life, showing slides of the towns and buildings in which Bach and his family lived. Professor Wright then discusses Bach's music, and techniques of Baroque music in general, within the context of the composer's life. The lecture concludes with a discussion of the Advent cantata Bach wrote based on the chorale "Wachet auf, ruft uns die Stimme."

00:00 - Chapter 1. A Brief Biography of J. S. Bach
16:48 - Chapter 2. Bach's Music and Characteristics of Baroque Style
28:08 - Chapter 3. Bach's "Wachet auf, ruft uns die Stimme": Discussion and Analysis
46:15 - Chapter 4. Bach's Legacy in Musical History

Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu


This course was recorded in Fall 2008.

Lecture 15. Gregorian Chant and Music in the Sistine Chapel
00:50:01
YaleCourses
8 Views · 3 years ago

Listening to Music (MUSI 112)

This lecture begins the third part of the course, which looks at music from a historical perspective. Here Professor Wright focuses on the medieval period. He discusses chant, and its role in the lives of monks and nuns in medieval monasteries, convents, and cathedrals. He then moves on to briefly discuss polyphony. The lecture is supplemented by visuals of cathedrals, monasteries, and medieval illuminations, as well as recordings of monophonic chant by the eleventh-century polymath Hildegard of Bingen, anonymous polyphony, polyphony by the Renaissance composer Giovanni Pierluigi Palestrina, and a recording of the last papal castrato, Alessandro Moreschi.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Gregorian Chants in the Medieval Period
07:14 - Chapter 2. Religious Influence on Early Music: The Roles of Monks and Nuns
16:56 - Chapter 3. Chant Analysis of Hildegard's "O Greenest Branch"
26:56 - Chapter 4. From Monophony to Polyphony: A Cappella of the Sistine Chapel
46:22 - Chapter 5. Conclusion

Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu


This course was recorded in Fall 2008.

Lecture 14. Ostinato Form in the Music of Purcell, Pachelbel, Elton John and Vitamin C
00:50:04
YaleCourses
14 Views · 3 years ago

Listening to Music (MUSI 112)

This lecture begins with a review of all the musical forms previously discussed in class: sonata-allegro, rondo, theme and variations, and fugue. Professor Wright then moves on to discuss the final form that will be taught before the students' next exam: ostinato. With the aid of music by Pachelbel, Purcell, and a few popular artists, Professor Wright shows the multitude of ways in which the ostinato bass has been used throughout the past several centuries.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Review of Musical Forms
05:19 - Chapter 2. Multiple Themes within Beethoven's Third Symphony
22:57 - Chapter 3. The Ostinato Form in Purcell's Opera
42:12 - Chapter 4. The Pachelbel Canon and Conclusion

Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu


This course was recorded in Fall 2008.

Lecture 13. Fugue: Bach, Bizet and Bernstein
00:49:58
YaleCourses
5 Views · 3 years ago

Listening to Music (MUSI 112)

In this lecture, Professor Wright briefly explores the manifestations of the fugue form in poetry, painting, and other disciplines, and then gives a detailed explanation of how fugues are put together in music. Though he uses excerpts by composers as disparate as Georges Bizet and Leonard Bernstein to illustrate his points, he draws his main musical examples from J.S. Bach.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction
02:13 - Chapter 2. The Structure of Fugues
12:31 - Chapter 3. Fugue Analysis in J. S. Bach's Compositions
29:40 - Chapter 4. Fugue Structures in Excerpts of Bizet and Bernstein

Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu


This course was recorded in Fall 2008.

Lecture 12. Guest Conductor: Saybrook Orchestra
00:49:37
YaleCourses
8 Views · 3 years ago

Listening to Music (MUSI 112)

In this lecture, Professor Wright discusses the nature of a critical concert review, in preparation for the students' assignment to review the Saybrook Orchestra's upcoming concert. The students are also introduced to Bradley Naylor, one of Saybrook Orchestra's conductors, who talks about what it takes to rehearse and lead an orchestra; Katie Dryden, the principal violist, who demonstrates some of the most interesting viola passages from the pieces on the program; and Elana Kagan, the principal flutist, who performs an excerpt from Beethoven's Sixth Symphony, which will close the concert.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction
03:53 - Chapter 2. Writing a Concert Review
13:45 - Chapter 3. Rehearsing and Leading an Orchestra
32:27 - Chapter 4. Viola Excerpts from the Concert Program
42:40 - Chapter 5. Balancing Solos in the Performance and Conclusion

Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu


This course was recorded in Fall 2008.

Lecture 11. Form: Rondo, Sonata-Allegro and Theme and Variations (cont.)
00:49:47
YaleCourses
8 Views · 3 years ago

Listening to Music (MUSI 112)

In this lecture, Professor Wright prepares the students for the upcoming concert they will attend, which will include pieces by Mozart, Brahms, and Beethoven. He discusses each of the pieces that will be on the program, paying special attention to form. Additional classical pieces are used to supplement the discussion of theme and variations and rondo form in the concert pieces. The lecture concludes with an example of rondo form found in a piece by the contemporary popular artist Sting.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction to the Concert Program
05:20 - Chapter 2. Analysis of Theme and Variations as a Form in Brahms's Composition
24:53 - Chapter 3. Introduction to the Rondo
33:58 - Chapter 4. Rondo in Vivaldi's Spring Concerto and Mozart's Horn Concerto
45:10 - Chapter 5. Rondo Form in Sting's Music and Conclusion

Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu


This course was recorded in Fall 2008.

Lecture 10. Sonata-Allegro and Theme and Variations
00:52:56
YaleCourses
14 Views · 3 years ago

Listening to Music (MUSI 112)

Professor Wright delves into sonata-allegro form in some depth in this lecture. He focuses especially on characterizing four types of music found within a sonata: thematic, transitional, developmental, and cadential. He then moves on to discuss a different form, theme and variations, which is accomplished through the use of examples from Beethoven's and Mozart's compositions. Professor Wright and guest artist Kensho Watanabe then conclude the lecture by demonstrating a set of theme and variations through a live performance of Corelli's La Folia.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction
02:34 - Chapter 2. Parts of the Sonata-Allegro Form
08:18 - Chapter 3. Distinguishing Functional Types within the Sonata-Allegro
20:58 - Chapter 4. Theme and Variations
34:11 - Chapter 5. Examining Theme and Variations in Corelli's La Folia

Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu


This course was recorded in Fall 2008.

Lecture 9. Sonata-Allegro Form: Mozart and Beethoven
00:49:20
YaleCourses
6 Views · 3 years ago

Listening to Music (MUSI 112)

A brief foray into the formal characteristics of contemporary popular music is used to launch this lecture on musical form. After a discussion of the "verse-chorus" form often used in popular music, Professor Wright proceeds to take students into the realm of classical music, focusing particularly on ternary form and sonata-allegro form. Throughout his detailed explanation of sonata-allegro form, he also elaborates upon some harmonic concepts describing, for example, the relationship between relative major and minor keys. This lecture draws its musical examples from 'N Sync, Mozart, and Beethoven.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Verse-Chorus Form in Popular Music
05:56 - Chapter 2. Introduction to Form in Classical Music
12:18 - Chapter 3. Ternary Form
18:00 - Chapter 4. The Sonata-Allegro Form in Mozart's "A Little Night Music"
36:19 - Chapter 5. The Sonata-Allegro Form in Beethoven's Fifth Symphony

Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu


This course was recorded in Fall 2008.

Lecture 8. Bass Patterns: Blues and Rock
00:48:03
YaleCourses
10 Views · 3 years ago

Listening to Music (MUSI 112)

In this lecture, Professor Wright teaches students how to listen for bass patterns in order to understand harmonic progressions. He talks through numerous musical examples from both popular music and classical music, showing the way that composers from both realms draw on the same chord progressions. The musical examples are taken from Mozart, Beethoven, Rossini, Wagner, Gene Chandler, the Beach Boys, Badly Drawn Boy, the Dave Matthews Band, and Justin Timberlake.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Review of Chord Formation
06:44 - Chapter 2. Chord Progressions and Harmonic Change
18:21 - Chapter 3. Popular and Classical Music Chord Progressions
31:12 - Chapter 4. Three-Chord Progressions
37:46 - Chapter 5. Four-Chord Progressions

Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu


This course was recorded in Fall 2008.

Lecture 7. Harmony: Chords and How to Build Them
00:50:14
YaleCourses
12 Views · 3 years ago

Listening to Music (MUSI 112)

Professor Wright explains the way harmony works in Western music. Throughout the lecture, he discusses the ways in which triads are formed out of scales, the ways that some of the most common harmonic progressions work, and the nature of modulation. Professor Wright focuses particularly on the listening skills involved in hearing whether harmonies are changing at regular or irregular rates in a given musical phrase. His musical examples in this lecture are wide-ranging, including such diverse styles as grand opera, bluegrass, and 1960s American popular music.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction to Harmony
03:36 - Chapter 2. The Formation and Changing of Chords
19:50 - Chapter 3. Harmonic Progressions
35:54 - Chapter 4. Major and Minor Harmonies in Popular Music
42:38 - Chapter 5. Modulation through Harmony

Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu


This course was recorded in Fall 2008.

Lecture 6. Melody: Mozart and Wagner
00:47:52
YaleCourses
10 Views · 3 years ago

Listening to Music (MUSI 112)

This lecture discusses melody and aesthetics; Professor Wright raises the question of what makes a melody beautiful, and uses excerpts from Puccini's Gianni Schicchi, Wagner's Tristan and Isolde and Mozart's Marriage of Figaro to explore this issue. Throughout the discussion, the foundations of classical phrase-structure and harmonic progressions are used to explain some of the choices these three composers made.

00:00 - Chapter 1. What Makes a Melody Beautiful?
05:39 - Chapter 2. Puccini's Gianni Schicchi: Cadences and Sequences
13:27 - Chapter 3. Wagner's Tristan and Isolde: Exploring Melodic Ascents and Descents
32:17 - Chapter 4. Mozart's Marriage of Figaro: Melodic Sequence Analysis

Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu


This course was recorded in Fall 2008.

Lecture 5. Melody: Notes, Scales, Nuts and Bolts
00:48:35
YaleCourses
12 Views · 3 years ago

Listening to Music (MUSI 112)

This lecture explores the basic nature of melody. Touching on historical periods ranging from ancient Greece to the present day, Professor Wright draws examples from musical worlds as disparate as nineteenth-century Europe and twentieth-century India, China, and America. Professor Wright puts forth a historical, technical, and holistic approach to understanding the way pitches and scales work in music. He concludes his lecture by bringing pitch and rhythm together in a discussion of Beethoven's Ninth Symphony.

00:00 - Chapter 1. The Nature of Melody
02:37 - Chapter 2. The Development of Notes and the Scale
14:43 - Chapter 3. Major, Minor, and Chromatic Scales in World Music
33:03 - Chapter 4. Pitch and Rhythm in Beethoven's Ninth Symphony

Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu


This course was recorded in Fall 2008.

Lecture 4. Rhythm: Jazz, Pop and Classical
00:51:24
YaleCourses
6 Views · 3 years ago

Listening to Music (MUSI 112)

Professor Wright begins this lecture with a brief introduction to musical acoustics, discussing the way multiple partials combine to make up every tone. He reviews fundamental rhythmic terms, such as "beat," "tempo," and "meter," and then demonstrates in more depth some of the more complex concepts, such as "syncopation" and the "triplet." Professor Wright then moves on to discuss the basics of musical texture, giving detailed examples of three primary types: monophonic, homophonic, and polyphonic. The class is then taught the basics of rhythmic dictation -- skill that entails notating the rhythm of a piece after listening to it. Each of these disparate threads is brought together in the conclusion of the lecture, in which Mozart's Requiem is shown to weave different rhythms, textures, and pitches together to depict the text effectively.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction to Multiple Partials
04:30 - Chapter 2. Syncopation and Triplets
14:33 - Chapter 3. Basics of Musical Texture
21:57 - Chapter 4. Counting Measures and Musical Dictation
38:15 - Chapter 5. Mozart's Requiem: Insights on Varying Textures and Pitches

Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu


This course was recorded in Fall 2008.

Lecture 3. Rhythm: Fundamentals
00:48:58
YaleCourses
13 Views · 3 years ago

Listening to Music (MUSI 112)

In this lecture, Professor Wright explains the basic system of Western musical notation, and offers an interpretation of its advantages and disadvantages. He also discusses the fundamental principles of rhythm, elaborating upon such concepts as beat, meter, and discussing in some depth the nature of durational patterns in duple and triple meters. The students are taught to conduct basic patterns in these meters through musical examples drawn from Chuck Mangione, Cole Porter, REM, Chopin, and Ravel.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Advantages and Disadvantages of Musical Notation
14:41 - Chapter 2. Beats and Meters
23:09 - Chapter 3. Exercises Distinguishing Duple and Triple Meters
31:27 - Chapter 4. Conducting Basic Meter Patterns: Exercises with REM, Chopin, and Ravel

Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu


This course was recorded in Fall 2008.

Lecture 2. Introduction to Instruments and Musical Genres
00:46:51
YaleCourses
11 Views · 3 years ago

Listening to Music (MUSI 112)

This lecture provides an introduction to basic classical music terminology, orchestral instruments, and acoustics. Professor Wright begins with a brief discussion of the distinctions between such broad terms as "song" and "piece," briefly mentioning more specific terms for musical genres, such as "symphony" and "opera." He then moves on to describe the differences between a "motive" and a "theme," demonstrating the distinction between the two with the use of music by Beethoven and Tchaikovsky. Following this, he calls upon three guest instrumentalists on French horn, bassoon, and viola to give a brief performance-introduction to each instrument. He concludes the session with a discussion of acoustics, focusing on the concept of partials, and then brings the lecture to a close with commentary on Richard Strauss's tone-poem, Death and Transfiguration.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Distinguishing "Songs" from "Pieces": Musical Lexicon
04:23 - Chapter 2. Genres, Motives, and Themes
16:51 - Chapter 3. Introduction to the French Horn and Partials
23:02 - Chapter 4. The Bassoon and the Viola
29:14 - Chapter 5. Mugorsky and the Basic Principles of Acoustics
40:30 - Chapter 6. Dissonance and Consonance in Strauss's Death and Transfiguration

Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu


This course was recorded in Fall 2008.

1. Introduction
00:49:41
YaleCourses
4 Views · 3 years ago

Listening to Music (MUSI 112)

Professor Wright introduces the course by suggesting that "listening to music" is not simply a passive activity one can use to relax, but rather, an active and rewarding process. He argues that by learning about the basic elements of Western classical music, such as rhythm, melody, and form, one learns strategies that can be used to understand many different kinds of music in a more thorough and precise way -- and further, one begins to understand the magnitude of human greatness. Professor Wright draws the music examples in this lecture from recordings of techno music, American musical theater, and works by Mozart, Beethoven, Debussy and Strauss, in order to introduce the issues that the course will explore in more depth throughout the semester.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction to Listening to Music
03:23 - Chapter 2. Why Listen to Classical Music?
12:14 - Chapter 3. Course Requirements and Pedagogy
21:11 - Chapter 4. Diagnostic Quiz
33:56 - Chapter 5. Pitch
42:04 - Chapter 6. Rhythm

Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu

This course was recorded in Fall 2008.

26. Reflections; Who Doesn't Hate Theory Now?
00:49:48
YaleCourses
5 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Theory of Literature (ENGL 300)

In this final lecture on literary theory, Professor Paul Fry revisits the relationship between language and speech, language and intention, and language and communication. Over the course of this discussion, he retrospectively defines theory as a means of establishing the extent to which "it is legitimate to be suspicious of communication." Along the way, he reconnects with New Criticism, Jakobson, Bakhtin, Saussure, de Man, Fish, and Knapp and Michaels. Through an analysis of epitaphs and a final tour through Tony the Tow Truck, he underscores the central role of language in the variety of literary theories presented in the course.

00:00 - Chapter 1. What Is Theory?
08:28 - Chapter 2. Three Ways That Language Impedes Speech
24:43 - Chapter 3. Language Speaking Through Speech
29:37 - Chapter 4. A Study of Epitaphs
40:59 - Chapter 5. Final Reflections on Tony the Tow Truck
47:07 - Chapter 6. Three Final Theses

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Spring 2009.

25. The End of Theory?; Neo-Pragmatism
00:53:33
YaleCourses
6 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Theory of Literature (ENGL 300)

In this lecture, Professor Paul Fry takes on Knapp and Michaels's influential article, "Against Theory." The historical context of the piece is given and key aspects of the theorists' critical orientations, specifically their neo-pragmatism, are defined. A lengthy discussion of the relationships between, on the one hand, intention and meaning and, on the other hand, language and speech follows with reference to Saussure, deconstruction, and Russian formalism. Knapp and Michaels's use of Wordsworth's "A Slumber Did My Spirit Seal" to explore the limits of meaning and intention is examined in depth. Ultimately, the case is made, using issues subject to dispute in Knapp and Michaels, that theory is a useful and necessary tool in literary studies.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Knapp and Michaels in Context
05:37 - Chapter 2. Stanley Fish
09:46 - Chapter 3. Knapp and Michaels's Three Arguments
15:54 - Chapter 4. Intention and Meaning: Wordsworth's "A Slumber Did My Spirit Seal"
27:04 - Chapter 5. The Discovery of Language in Speech
36:47 - Chapter 6. The Impracticality of Theory

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Spring 2009.

24. The Institutional Construction of Literary Study
00:50:53
YaleCourses
7 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Theory of Literature (ENGL 300)

In this lecture on critical identities, Professor Fry examines the work of Stanley Fish and John Guillory. The lecture begins by examining Tony the Tow Truck as a site for the emergence of literary identities, then brings the course's use of the children's story under scrutiny through the lens of Fish. The evolution of Fish's theory of interpretive communities is traced chronologically through his publications and examined in close-up in Milton's Paradise Lost. John Guillory's work on interpretive communities and the culture wars leads to a discussion of the Western canon and multiculturalism.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Identity in Theory
09:14 - Chapter 2. Identity in Tony the Tow Truck
13:24 - Chapter 3. Introduction to Interpretive Communities
22:17 - Chapter 4. Stanley Fish: First Take on Interpretive Communities
27:15 - Chapter 5. Stanley Fish: Second Take on Interpretive Communities
33:52 - Chapter 6. The Limits of Interpretive Community
39:52 - Chapter 7. Guillory: The School and Other Interpretive Communities

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Spring 2009.

23. Queer Theory and Gender Performativity
00:49:55
YaleCourses
14 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Theory of Literature (ENGL 300)

In this lecture on queer theory, Professor Paul Fry explores the work of Judith Butler in relation to Michel Foucault's History of Sexuality. Differences in terminology and methods are discussed, including Butler's emphasis on performance and Foucault's reliance on formulations such as "power-knowledge" and "the deployment of alliance." Butler's fixation with ontology is explored with reference to Levi-Strauss's concept of the raw and the cooked. At the lecture's conclusion, Butler's interrogation of identity politics is compared with that of postcolonial and African-American theorists.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction to Judith Butler: What Is Sexuality?
03:46 - Chapter 2. Foucault and the Deployment of Alliance
14:53 - Chapter 3. Performing Gender
24:10 - Chapter 4. The Political Agenda of Gender Theory
33:39 - Chapter 5. Foucault's Method, Butler's Method
46:20 - Chapter 6. The Gendering of Reading

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Spring 2009.

22. Post-Colonial Criticism
00:54:42
YaleCourses
12 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Theory of Literature (ENGL 300)

In this lecture on post-colonial theory, Professor Paul Fry explores the work of Edward Said and Homi K. Bhabha. The complicated origins, definitions, and limitations of the term "post-colonial" are outlined. Elaine Showalter's theory of the phasic development of female literary identity is applied to the expression of post-colonial identities. Crucial terms such as ambivalence, hybridity, and double consciousness are explained. The relationship between Bhabha's concept of sly civility and Gates's "signifyin'" is discussed, along with the reliance of both on semiotics.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Problems With the Term "Post-Colonial"
08:56 - Chapter 2. A Room of One's Own Revisited
14:00 - Chapter 3. Orientalism and Showalter's Phases
20:51 - Chapter 4. The Relationship Between Said and Bhabha
26:54 - Chapter 5. The Master-Slave Dialectic
36:12 - Chapter 6. Bhabha: Ambivalence and Hybridity
50:40 - Chapter 7. "Sly Civility" as Signifyin'

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Spring 2009.

21. African-American Criticism
00:53:58
YaleCourses
8 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Theory of Literature (ENGL 300)

In this lecture, Professor Paul Fry examines trends in African-American criticism through the lens of Henry Louis Gates, Jr. and Toni Morrison. A brief history of African-American literature and criticism is undertaken, and the relationship of both to feminist theory is explicated. The problems in cultural and identity studies of essentialism, "the identity queue," expropriation, and biology are surveyed, with particular attention paid to the work of Michael Cooke and Morrison's reading of Huckleberry Finn. At the lecture's conclusion, the tense relationship between African-American studies and New Critical assumptions are explored with reference to Robert Penn Warren's poem, "Pondy Woods."

00:00 - Chapter 1. Origins of African-American Literary Criticism
03:16 - Chapter 2. Henry Louis Gates and the Problem of Essentialism
12:13 - Chapter 3. The Problem of the "Identity Cue"
15:15 - Chapter 4. Tony Morrison and African-American Identity
22:01 - Chapter 5. Morrison's Reading of Huckleberry Finn
25:17 - Chapter 6. Gates and the Community of African-American Critics
36:44 - Chapter 7. Expropriation

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Spring 2009.

20. The Classical Feminist Tradition
00:52:24
YaleCourses
9 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Theory of Literature (ENGL 300)

In this lecture on feminist criticism, Professor Paul Fry uses Virginia Woolf's A Room of One's Own as a lens to and commentary on the flourishing of feminist criticism in the twentieth century. The structure and rhetoric of A Room of One's Own is extensively analyzed, as are its core considerations of female novelists such as Austen, Eliot, and the Brontës. The works of major feminist critics, such as Ann Douglas, Mary Ellman, Kate Millett, Elaine Showalter, and Sandra Gilbert and Susan Gubar, are mentioned. The logocentric approach to gender theory, specifically the task of defining female language as something different and separate from male language, is considered alongside Woolf's own endorsement of literary and intellectual androgyny.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Transition into Feminist Theory: Tony the Tow Truck
06:35 - Chapter 2. Overlapping Identities
15:29 - Chapter 3. The Structure of A Room of One's Own
22:32 - Chapter 4. Feminist Criticism and A Room of One's Own
28:23 - Chapter 5. Women's Language and the Male Sentence
39:18 - Chapter 6. Complications and Implications of Classical Feminism

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Spring 2009.

19. The New Historicism
00:53:22
YaleCourses
10 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Theory of Literature (ENGL 300)

In this lecture, Professor Paul Fry examines the work of two seminal New Historicists, Stephen Greenblatt and Jerome McGann. The origins of New Historicism in Early Modern literary studies are explored, and New Historicism's common strategies, preferred evidence, and literary sites are explored. Greenblatt's reliance on Foucault is juxtaposed with McGann's use of Bakhtin. The lecture concludes with an extensive consideration of the project of editing of Keats's poetry in light of New Historicist concerns.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Origins of New Historicism
06:16 - Chapter 2. The New Historicist Method and Foucault
10:56 - Chapter 3. The Reciprocal Relationship Between History and Discourse
19:24 - Chapter 4. The Historian and Subjectivity
26:12 - Chapter 5. Jerome McGann and Bakhtin
30:28 - Chapter 6. McGann on Keats
45:54 - Chapter 7. Tony the Tow Truck Revisited

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Spring 2009.

18. The Political Unconscious
00:53:46
YaleCourses
9 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Theory of Literature (ENGL 300)

In this lecture, Professor Paul Fry explores Fredric Jameson's seminal work, The Political Unconscious, as an outcropping of Marxist literary criticism and structural theory. Texts such as Shelley's "Ode to the West Wind" and Shakespeare's seventy-third sonnet are examined in the context of Jameson's three horizons of underlying interpretive frameworks--the political, the social, and the historical, each carefully explained. The extent to which those frameworks permeate individual thought is addressed in a discussion of Jameson's concept of the "ideologeme." The theorist's work is juxtaposed with the writings of Bakhtin and Levi-Strauss. The lecture concludes by revisiting the children's story Tony the Tow Truck, upon which Jameson's theory of literature is mapped.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Marxist Aesthetics and Frederic Jameson
07:42 - Chapter 2. Romance at the Three Horizons
22:18 - Chapter 3. The Political Unconscious at the Three Horizons
38:08 - Chapter 4. Literary Analysis: Shelley's "Ode to the West Wind"
43:34 - Chapter 5. The Formal Emphasis at the Three Horizons
47:16 - Chapter 6. Acknowledged Interpretive Dangers
49:55 - Chapter 7. Application: Tony the Tow Truck

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Spring 2009.

17. The Frankfurt School of Critical Theory
00:51:37
YaleCourses
6 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Theory of Literature (ENGL 300)

This first lecture on social theories of art and artistic production examines the Frankfurt School. The theoretical writings of Theodor Adorno and Walter Benjamin are explored in historical and political contexts, including Marxism, socialist realism, and late capitalism. The concept of mechanical reproduction, specifically the relationship between labor and art, is explained at some length. Adorno's opposition to this argument, and his own position, are explained. The lecture concludes with a discussion of Benjamin's perspective on the use of distraction and shock in the process of aesthetic revelation.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Marx, Engels, and Ideology
09:46 - Chapter 2. The Aesthetics of Marxist Criticism
19:58 - Chapter 3. Adorno, the Work of Art, and Collectivity
27:54 - Chapter 4. Bloch's Principle of Hope
31:09 - Chapter 5. Benjamin and Mechanical Reproduction
37:54 - Chapter 6. Adorno and Conformism
41:01 - Chapter 7. Benjamin, the Spectator, and Distraction

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Spring 2009.

16. The Social Permeability of Reader and Text
00:50:10
YaleCourses
24 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Theory of Literature (ENGL 300)

In this first lecture on the theory of literature in social contexts, Professor Paul Fry examines the work of Mikhail Bakhtin and Hans Robert Jauss. The relation of their writing to formalist theory and the work of Barthes and Foucault is articulated. The dimensions of Bakhtin's heteroglossia, along with the idea of common language, are explored in detail through a close reading of the first sentence of Jane Austin's Pride and Prejudice. Jauss's study of the history of reception is explicated with reference to Borges' "Pierre Menard, Author of the Quixote" and the Broadway revival of Damn Yankees.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Language in Social Context
09:32 - Chapter 2. Bakhtin, Jauss, and Formalism
22:01 - Chapter 3. Bakhtin and Authority
28:36 - Chapter 4. Pride and Prejudice
35:52 - Chapter 5. Common Language
40:02 - Chapter 6. Jauss and the History of Reception

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Spring 2009.

15. The Postmodern Psyche
00:52:50
YaleCourses
13 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Theory of Literature (ENGL 300)

In this lecture on the postmodern psyche, Professor Paul Fry explores the work of Gilles Deleuze, and Felix Guattari. and Slavoj Žižek. The notion of the "postmodern" is defined through the use of examples in the visual arts and architecture. Deleuze and Guattari's theory of "rhizomatic" thinking and their intellectual debts are elucidated. Žižek's film criticism, focused on the relation between desire and need, is explored in connection with Lacan.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Žižek, Deleuze, and the Political
08:37 - Chapter 2. What Is Postmodernism?
16:22 - Chapter 3. Postmodernism, Doubt, and Vision
22:52 - Chapter 4. Dehumanization
28:31 - Chapter 5. Deleuze, Guattari, and Lacan
35:16 - Chapter 6. The Rhizome
39:25 - Chapter 7. Žižek
46:53 - Chapter 8. Holbein's The Ambassadors
50:08 - Chapter 9. Language and Desire

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Spring 2009.

14. Influence
00:51:17
YaleCourses
14 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Theory of Literature (ENGL 300)

In this lecture on the psyche in literary theory, Professor Paul Fry explores the work of T. S. Eliot and Harold Bloom, specifically their studies of tradition and individualism. Related and divergent perspectives on tradition, innovation, conservatism, and self-effacement are traced throughout Eliot's "Tradition and the Individual Talent" and Bloom's "Meditation upon Priority." Particular emphasis is placed on the process by which poets struggle with the literary legacies of their precursors. The relationship of Bloom's thinking, in particular, to Freud's Oedipus complex is duly noted. The lecture draws heavily from the works of Pope, Borges, Joyce, Homer, Wordsworth, Longinus, and Milton.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction to Harold Bloom
06:31 - Chapter 2. Mimesis and Imitatio
11:51 - Chapter 3. Bloom "Misreads" Eliot
29:34 - Chapter 4: Literary History: the Always Already Written "Strong Poem"
48:09 - Chapter 5. Lacan and Bloom on Tony the Tow Truck

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Spring 2009.

13. Jacques Lacan in Theory
00:51:10
YaleCourses
6 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Theory of Literature (ENGL 300)

In this lecture on psychoanalytic criticism, Professor Paul Fry explores the work of Jacques Lacan. Lacan's interest in Freud and distaste for post-Freudian "ego psychologists" are briefly mentioned, and his clinical work on "the mirror stage" is discussed in depth. The relationship in Lacanian thought, between metaphor and metonymy is explored through the image of the point de capiton. The correlation between language and the unconscious, and the distinction between desire and need, are also explained, with reference to Hugo's "Boaz Asleep."

00:00 - Chapter 1. Peter Brooks and Lacan
09:03 - Chapter 2. Lacan and Freudian Scholarship
15:51 - Chapter 3. The Mirror Stage
22:18 - Chapter 4. Language and the Unconscious
30:25 - Chapter 5. Metonymy, Metaphor, and Desire
37:03 - Chapter 6. What Is Desire?
46:50 - Chapter 7. Slavoj Žižek

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Spring 2009.

12. Freud and Fiction
00:50:40
YaleCourses
17 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Theory of Literature (ENGL 300)

In this lecture, Professor Paul Fry turns his attention to the relationship between authorship and the psyche. Freud's meditations on the fundamental drives governing human behavior are read through the lens of literary critic Peter Brooks. The origins of Freud's work on the "pleasure principle" and his subsequent revision of it are charted, and the immediate and constant influence of Freudian thought on literary production is asserted. Brooks' contributions to literary theory are explored: particularly the coupling of multiple Freudian principles, including the pleasure principle and the death wish, and their application to narrative structures. At the lecture's conclusion, the professor returns to the children's story, Tony the Tow Truck, to suggest the universality of Brooks' argument.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Brooks' Debt to Jakobson and de Man
06:10 - Chapter 2. Brooks' Debt to Freud
13:14 - Chapter 3. Brooks' Departure from Freud
22:04 - Chapter 4. Freud's Beyond the Pleasure Principle
27:01 - Chapter 5. "The Aim of All Life is Death"
34:08 - Chapter 6. Merging the Pleasure Principle with the Death Wish
41:42 - Chapter 7. Tony the Tow Truck Revisited

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Spring 2009.

11. Deconstruction II
00:52:58
YaleCourses
2 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Theory of Literature (ENGL 300)

In this second lecture on deconstruction, Professor Paul Fry concludes his consideration of Derrida and begins to explore the work of Paul de Man. Derrida's affinity for and departure from Levi-Strauss's distinction between nature and culture are outlined. De Man's relationship with Derrida, their similarities and differences--particularly de Man's insistence on "self-deconstruction" and his reliance on Jakobson--are discussed. The difference between rhetoric and grammar, particularly the rhetoricization of grammar and the grammaticization of rhetoric, is elucidated through de Man's own examples taken from "All in the Family," Yeats' "Among School Children," and the novels of Proust.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Derrida and Levi-Strauss
10:37 - Chapter 2. Writing and Speech
16:06 - Chapter 3. Paul de Man and Nazism
24:37 - Chapter 4. Similarities Between De Man and Derrida
33:35 - Chapter 5. De Man and Derrida: Differences
39:24 - Chapter 6. Examples: "All in the Family," Yeats, and Proust

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Spring 2009.

10. Deconstruction I
00:51:43
YaleCourses
3 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Theory of Literature (ENGL 300)

In this lecture on Derrida and the origins of deconstruction, Professor Paul Fry explores two central Derridian works: "Structure, Sign, and Play in the Discourse of Human Sciences" and "Différance." Derrida's critique of structuralism and semiotics, particularly the work of Levi-Strauss and Saussure, is articulated. Deconstruction's central assertions that language is by nature arbitrary and that meaning is indeterminate are examined. Key concepts, such as the nature of the text, discourse, différance, and supplementarity are explored.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Origins and Influence of Jacques Derrida
06:33 - Chapter 2. Derrida's Style
09:25 - Chapter 3. The Eiffel Tower and Wallace Stevens' "Anecdote of the Jar"
17:00 - Chapter 4. Levi-Strauss and the Oedipus Myth
22:39 - Chapter 5. Derrida and Semiotic Science
28:13 - Chapter 6. "Event" and History
33:42 - Chapter 7. Language and Writing
42:34 - Chapter 8. Language, Supplementarity, and Différance

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Spring 2009.

9. Linguistics and Literature
00:49:54
YaleCourses
9 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Theory of Literature (ENGL 300)

In this lecture on the work of Roman Jakobson, Professor Paul Fry continues his discussion of synchrony and diachrony. The relationships among formalism, semiotics, and linguistics are explored. Claude Levi-Strauss's structural interpretation of the Oedipus myth is discussed in some detail. In order to differentiate Jakobson's poetic functions, Professor Fry analyzes the sentence "It is raining" from six perspectives. Significant attention is paid to the use of diagrams in literary linguistic theory.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Synchrony and Diachrony
06:47 - Chapter 2. The Emergence of Structuralism
11:24 - Chapter 3. The Relationship Between Formalism and Semiotics
17:33 - Chapter 4. Levi-Strauss and the Meaning of the Oedipus Myth
26:19 - Chapter 5. The Poetic Function
32:49 - Chapter 6. Jacobson's Six Functions
43:53 - Chapter 7. Metalanguage and Poetic Function

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Spring 2009.

8. Semiotics and Structuralism
00:51:31
YaleCourses
14 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Theory of Literature (ENGL 300)

In this lecture, Professor Paul Fry explores the semiotics movement through the work of its founding theorist, Ferdinand de Saussure. The relationship of semiotics to hermeneutics, New Criticism, and Russian formalism is considered. Key semiotic binaries--such as langue and parole, signifier and signified, and synchrony and diachrony--are explored. Considerable time is spent applying semiotics theory to the example of a "red light" in a variety of semiotic contexts.

00:00 - Chapter 1. What is Semiology?
08:34 - Chapter 2. "Langue" and "Parole," "Signified" and "Signifier"
27:08 - Chapter 3. Positive and Negative Knowledge: Arbitrary and Differential
33:11 - Chapter 4. Example: the Red Stoplight
45:55 - Chapter 5. Synchrony and Diachrony

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Spring 2009.

7. Russian Formalism
00:48:57
YaleCourses
6 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Theory of Literature (ENGL 300)

In this lecture, Professor Paul Fry explores the works of major Russian formalists reviewed in an essay by Boris Eikhenbaum. He begins by distinguishing Russian formalism from hermeneutics. Eikhenbaum's dependency on core ideas of Marxist and Darwinian philosophies of struggle and evolution is explained. Formalism's scientific language and methodical aspirations are discussed. Crucial formalist distinctions between plot and story, practical and poetic language, and literature and literariness are clarified.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction to the Russian Formalist Tradition
09:22 - Chapter 2. Boris Eikhenbaum
20:02 - Chapter 3. Criticism of Perception: Defamiliarization
24:51 - Chapter 4. Poetic Language and Practical Language
30:30 - Chapter 5. Device as a Function
35:36 - Chapter 6. Plot and Story
41:25 - Chapter 7. The Literary as Historiography

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Spring 2009.

6. The New Criticism and Other Western Formalisms
00:50:07
YaleCourses
12 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Theory of Literature (ENGL 300)

In this second lecture on formalism, Professor Paul Fry begins by exploring the implications of Wimsatt and Beardsley's theory of literary interpretation by applying them to Yeats's "Lapis Lazuli." He then maps the development of Anglo-American formalism from Modernist literature to the American and British academies. Some time is spent examining the similarities and differences between the works of I. A. Richards and his protegé, William Empson. The lecture finally turns to a discussion of Cleanth Brooks's conception of unity.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Yeats' "Lapis Lazuli" and Tony the Tow Truck
07:18 - Chapter 2. The New Criticism: Modernist and Academic Contexts
13:44 - Chapter 3. Earlier Close Readers: I. A. Richards
24:27 - Chapter 4. Earlier Close Readers: William Empson
37:50 - Chapter 5. Brooks and the "Implications of "Unity"

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Spring 2009.

5. The Idea of the Autonomous Artwork
00:46:25
YaleCourses
10 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Theory of Literature (ENGL 300)

In this lecture, Professor Paul Fry explores the origins of formalist literary criticism. Considerable attention is paid to the rise and subsequent popularity of the New Critics and their preferred site of literary exploration, the "poem." The idea of autonomous art is explored in the writings of, among others, Kant, Coleridge, and Wilde. Using the work of Wimsatt and Beardsley, the lecture concludes with an examination of acceptable categories of evidence in New Criticism.

00:00 - Chapter 1. New Criticism and the Poem as (Miniature) World
07:28 - Chapter 2. Formalism and Immanuel Kant
21:35 - Chapter 3. Kant and Coleridge: The Good, the Agreeable, and the Beautiful
28:21 - Chapter 4. Wimsatt and Beardsley: The Anatomy of the "Poem"
40:34 - Chapter 5. Wimsatt and Beardsley: Permissable Evidence

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Spring 2009.

4. Configurative Reading
00:52:14
YaleCourses
9 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Theory of Literature (ENGL 300)

The discussion of Gadamer and Hirsch continues in this lecture, which further examines the relationship between reading and interpretation. Through a comparative analysis of these theorists, Professor Paul Fry explores the difference between meaning and significance, the relationship between understanding and paraphrasing, and the nature of the gap between the reader and the text. Through Wolfgang Iser's essay, "The Reading Process," the nature of textual expectation and surprise, and the theory of their universal importance in narrative, is explained. The lecture concludes by considering the fundamental, inescapable role that hermeneutic premises play in canon formation.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Gadamer Revisited
08:47 - Chapter 2. Hirsch's Historicism
19:44 - Chapter 3. Iser: The Act of Reading
28:25 - Chapter 4. Expectations
43:12 - Chapter 5. Tony the Tow Truck
48:51 - Chapter 6. Gadamer, Iser, Hirsch, and the Canon

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Spring 2009.

3. Ways In and Out of the Hermeneutic Circle
00:46:44
YaleCourses
9 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Theory of Literature (ENGL 300)

In this lecture, Professor Paul Fry examines acts of reading and interpretation by way of the theory of hermeneutics. The origins of hermeneutic thought are traced through Western literature. The mechanics of hermeneutics, including the idea of a hermeneutic circle, are explored in detail with reference to the works of Hans-George Gadamer, Martin Heidegger, and E. D. Hirsch. Particular attention is paid to the emergence of concepts of "historicism" and "historicality" and their relation to hermeneutic theory.

00:00 - Chapter 1. The History of Hermeneutics
10:32 - Chapter 2. The Hermeneutic Circle
20:37 - Chapter 3. On Prejudice
23:45 - Chapter 4. Historicism and "Historicality"
27:48 - Chapter 5. Gadamer's Debt to Heidegger
33:21 - Chapter 6. Prejudice and Tradition
37:20 - Chapter 7. E. D. Hirsch

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Spring 2009.

2. Introduction (cont.)
00:46:31
YaleCourses
8 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Theory of Literature (ENGL 300)

In this second introductory lecture, Professor Paul Fry explores the interrelation of skepticism and determinism. The nature of discourse and the related issue of discursivity is read through two modern works, Anton Chekov's Cherry Orchard and Henry James' The Ambassadors. Exemplary critical focus on literary authority is located in Michel Foucault's "What Is an Author" and [Roland] Barthes' "The Death of the Author," both of which are read with an emphasis on their historical contexts. Objections to the approach and conclusions of the two theorists are examined, particularly in light of the rise of cultural studies.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction
01:52 - Chapter 2. Anton Chekhov and Henry James
11:26 - Chapter 3. Author and Authority
19:36 - Chapter 4. "The Founders of Discursivity"
28:20 - Chapter 5. Critique of the "Author Function"

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Spring 2009.

1. Introduction
00:39:29
YaleCourses
13 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Theory of Literature (ENGL 300)

In this first lecture, Professor Paul Fry explores the course's title in three parts. The relationship between theory and philosophy, the question of what literature is and does, and what constitutes an introduction are interrogated. The professor then situates the emergence of literary theory in the history of modern criticism and, through an analysis of major thinkers such as Marx, Nietzsche, and Freud, provides antecedents for twentieth-century theoretical developments.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction
04:29 - Chapter 2. Theory and Philosophy
10:08 - Chapter 3. What Is Literature?
13:10 - Chapter 4. The Idea of an "Introduction"
18:11 - Chapter 5. Literary Theory and the History of Modern Criticism
32:10 - Chapter 6. The Hermeneutics of Suspicion

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Spring 2009.

24.  In Defense of Politics
00:39:02
YaleCourses
9 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Political Philosophy (PLSC 114)

This final lecture of the course is given "in defense of politics." First, the idea and definition of "politics" and the "political" are discussed with reference to the ideas of Immanuel Kant and twentieth-century political scientists, novelists, and philosophers such as Bernard Crick, E. M. Forster, and Carl Schmitt. Patriotism, nationalism, and cosmopolitanism are also addressed as integral parts of political life. Finally, the role of educators--and "old books"--is discussed as essential to developing a proper understanding of the political.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Bernard Crick: "In Defense of Politics"
03:55 - Chapter 2. E. M. Forster: PatriotIsm and Loyalty
07:29 - Chapter 3. Carl Schmitt and Aristotle: Patriotism and Loyalty
12:24 - Chapter 4. Immanuel Kant: Transpolitical Cosmopolitanism
16:17 - Chapter 5. Schmitt vs. Kant: NationalIsm vs. Cosmopolitanism
25:45 - Chapter 6. Ethos of the American Regime
33:05 - Chapter 7. Where Should the Study of Political Science Be Today? Who Should Educate the Educators?

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

23. Democratic Statecraft: Tocqueville's Democracy in America
00:50:34
YaleCourses
8 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Political Philosophy (PLSC 114)

Professor Smith discusses the moral and psychological components of the democratic state in the context of Tocqueville's Democracy in America. He goes on to explore the institutional development of the democratic state, the qualities of the democratic individual, and the psychological determinants of the democratic character. The ethic of self-interest is addressed, understood as an antidote to an ethic of fame and glory. Finally, Tocqueville is presented as a political educator and his views on the role of statesmen in a democratic age are expounded.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Moral and Psychological Features of the Democratic State
04:32 - Chapter 2. Moral and Psychological Features of the Democratic State: Compassion
15:17 - Chapter 3. Moral and Psychological Features of the Democratic State: Anxiety
22:19 - Chapter 4. Moral and Psychological Features of the Democratic State: Self-Interest
33:44 - Chapter 5. Democratic Statecraft

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

22. Democratic Statecraft: Tocqueville's Democracy in America
00:38:13
YaleCourses
9 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Political Philosophy (PLSC 114)

Three main features that Tocqueville regarded as central to American democracy are discussed: the importance of local government, the concept of "civil association," and "the spirit of religion." The book is not simply a celebration of the democratic experience in America; Tocqueville is deeply worried about the potential of a democratic tyranny.

00:00 - Chapter 1. The Characteristics of American Democracy: Civil Association
10:50 - Chapter 2. The Characteristics of American Democracy: Spirit of Religion
25:47 - Chapter 3. Tyranny of the Majority

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

21. Democratic Statecraft: Tocqueville's Democracy in America
00:42:05
YaleCourses
11 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Political Philosophy (PLSC 114)

With the emergence of democracies in Europe and the New World at the beginning of the nineteenth century, political philosophers began to re-evaluate the relationship between freedom and equality. Tocqueville, in particular, saw the creation of new forms of social power that presented threats to human liberty. His most famous work, Democracy in America, was written for his French countrymen who were still devoted to the restoration of the monarchy and whom Tocqueville wanted to convince that the democratic social revolution he had witnessed in America was equally representative of France's future.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Tocqueville's Problem
08:36 - Chapter 2. Who Was Alexis de Tocqueville?
14:04 - Chapter 3. Democracy in America and the Letter to Kergolay
35:46 - Chapter 4. The CharacterIstics of American Democracy: Importance of Local Government

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

20. Democracy and Participation: Rousseau's Social Contract, I-II
00:40:39
YaleCourses
11 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Political Philosophy (PLSC 114)

The concept of "general will" is considered Rousseau's most important contribution to political science. It is presented as the answer to the gravest problems of civilization, namely, the problems of inequality, amour-propre, and general discontent. The social contract is the foundation of the general will and the answer to the problem of natural freedom, because nature itself provides no guidelines for determining who should rule. The lecture ends with Rousseau's legacy and the influence he exercised on later nineteenth-century writers and philosophers.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction: Social Contract and the General Will
25:04 - Chapter 2. Applications of the General Will
30:54 - Chapter 3. The Legacies of Rousseau

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

19. Democracy and Participation: Rousseau's Discourse
00:41:36
YaleCourses
7 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Political Philosophy (PLSC 114)

The discussion on the origins of inequality in the Second Discourse continues. This lecture focuses on amour-propre, a faculty or a disposition that is related to a range of psychological characteristics such as pride, vanity, and conceit. The Social Contract is subsequently discussed with an emphasis on the concept of freedom and how one's desire to preserve one's freedom is often in conflict with that of others to protect and defend their own. General will becomes Rousseau's solution to the problem of securing individual liberty.

00:00 - Chapter 1. "Amour-Propre": The Most Durable Cause of Inequality
20:15 - Chapter 2. Civilization and Its DIscontents
32:06 - Chapter 3. The Social Contract

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

18. Democracy and Participation: Rousseau's Discourse
00:43:53
YaleCourses
9 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Political Philosophy (PLSC 114)

This lecture is an introduction to the life and works of Rousseau, as well as the historical and political events in France after the death of Louis XIV. Writing in a variety of genres and disciplines, Rousseau helped bring to fruition the political and intellectual movement known as the Enlightenment. Among his most important works is the Second Discourse (Discourse on Inequality), in which Rousseau traces the origins of inequality and addresses the effects of time and history on humans. He goes on to discuss a number of qualities, such as perfectibility, compassion, sensitivity, and goodness, in an attempt to assess which ones were a part of our original nature.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Who Is Rousseau?
18:22 - Chapter 2. Rousseau's State of Nature
34:45 - Chapter 3. Civilization and Property: How Man Transitioned from Nature to Society

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

17. Constitutional Government: Locke's Second Treatise (13-19)
00:45:12
YaleCourses
9 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Political Philosophy (PLSC 114)

In this lecture, two important issues are addressed in the context of Locke's Second Treatise. First, there is discussion on the role of the executive vis-a-vis the legislative branch of government in Locke's theory of the constitutional state. Second, Locke's political theories are related to the American regime and contemporary American political philosophy. The lecture concludes with John Rawls' book, A Theory of Justice, and how his general theory relates to Locke's political ideas.

00:00 - Chapter 1. The Role of Executive Power in Locke's Theory of Government
27:41 - Chapter 2. Contrasting Rawls' Theory of Justice with Locke's Theory of LiberalIsm
42:17 - Chapter 3. Locke, the American Regime and the Current State of Political Philosophy

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

16. Constitutional Government: Locke's Second Treatise (7-12)
00:45:12
YaleCourses
7 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Political Philosophy (PLSC 114)

In the opening chapters of his Second Treatise, Locke "rewrites" the account of human beginnings that had belonged exclusively to Scripture. He tells the story of how humans, finding themselves in a condition of nature with no adjudicating authority, enjoy property acquired through their labor. The lecture goes on to discuss the idea of natural law, the issue of government by consent, and what may be considered Locke's most significant contribution to political philosophy: the Doctrine of Consent.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Locke and the Spirit of CapitalIsm
15:34 - Chapter 2. Government by Consent
40:26 - Chapter 3. The Lockean Limited Government

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

15. Constitutional Government: Locke's Second Treatise (1-5)
00:44:41
YaleCourses
10 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Political Philosophy (PLSC 114)

John Locke had such a profound influence on Thomas Jefferson that he may be deemed an honorary founding father of the United States. He advocated the natural equality of human beings, their natural rights to life, liberty, and property, and defined legitimate government in terms that Jefferson would later use in the Declaration of Independence. Locke's life and works are discussed, and the lecture shows how he transformed ideas previously formulated by Machiavelli and Hobbes into a more liberal constitutional theory of the state.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Who Is John Locke?
13:11 - Chapter 2. John Locke's Theory of Natural Law
31:27 - Chapter 3. Property, Labor and the Theory of Natural Law

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

14. The Sovereign State: Hobbes' Leviathan
00:44:24
YaleCourses
10 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Political Philosophy (PLSC 114)

The concept of sovereignty is discussed in Hobbesian terms. For Hobbes, "the sovereign" is an office rather than a person, and can be characterized by what we have come to associate with executive power and executive authority. Hobbes' theories of laws are also addressed and the distinction he makes between "just laws" and "good laws." The lecture ends with a discussion of Hobbes' ideas in the context of the modern state.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction: Hobbes' Theory of Sovereignty
06:00 - Chapter 2. The Doctrine of Legal PositivIsm: The Law Is What the Sovereign Commands
23:14 - Chapter 3. Hobbesian Liberalism
32:10 - Chapter 4. Hobbes and the Modern State

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

13. The Sovereign State: Hobbes' Leviathan
00:46:24
YaleCourses
10 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Political Philosophy (PLSC 114)

Hobbes' most famous metaphor, that of "the state of nature," is explained. It can be understood as the condition of human life in the absence of authority or anyone to impose rules, laws, and order. The concept of the individual is also discussed on Hobbesian terms, according to which the fundamental characteristics of the human beings are the capacity to exercise will and the ability to choose. Hobbes, as a moralist, concludes that the laws of nature, or "precepts of reason," forbid us from doing anything destructive in life.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Hobbes on Individuality
09:49 - Chapter 2. Hobbes' Skeptical View of Knowledge
14:11 - Chapter 3. The State of Nature
23:14 - Chapter 4. Pride and Fear: Passions that Dominate Human Nature
29:09 - Chapter 5. The Laws of Nature

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

12. The Sovereign State: Hobbes' Leviathan
00:45:29
YaleCourses
11 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Political Philosophy (PLSC 114)

This is an introduction to the political views of Thomas Hobbes, which are often deemed paradoxical. On the one hand, Hobbes is a stern defender of political absolutism. The Hobbesian doctrine of sovereignty dictates complete monopoly of power within a given territory and over all institutions of civilian or ecclesiastical authority. On the other hand, Hobbes insists on the fundamental equality of human beings. He maintains that the state is a contract between individuals, that the sovereign owes his authority to the will of those he governs and is obliged to protect the interests of the governed by assuring civil peace and security. These ideas have been interpreted by some as indicative of liberal opposition to absolutism.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction: Thomas Hobbes
07:28 - Chapter 2. Who Was Hobbes?
14:12 - Chapter 3. Comparing Hobbes to Machiavelli and Aristotle
25:26 - Chapter 4. Hobbes on Art, Science and Politics
33:55 - Chapter 5. Hobbes' "Great Question": What Makes Legitimate Authority Possible?
40:32 - Chapter 6. What Makes Hobbes' Story a Plausible Account of "The State of Nature"?

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

11. New Modes and Orders: Machiavelli's The Prince (chaps. 13-26)
00:43:29
YaleCourses
10 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Political Philosophy (PLSC 114)

The discussion of Machiavelli's politics continues in the context of his most famous work, The Prince. A reformer of the moral Christian and classical concepts of goodness and evil, Machiavelli proposes his own definitions of virtue and vice, replacing the vocabulary associated with Plato and the biblical sources. He relates virtue, or virtu, to manliness, force, ambition and the desire to achieve success at all costs. Fortune, or fortuna, is a woman, that must be conquered through policies of force, brutality, and audacity. The problem of "dirty hands" in political and philosophical literature is discussed in detail.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction and Class Agenda
04:09 - Chapter 2. "Discourses on Livy"
10:30 - Chapter 3. The Problem of "Dirty Hands"
22:50 - Chapter 4. Was Machiavelli a Machiavellian?
36:19 - Chapter 5. What Did Machiavelli Achieve?

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

10. New Modes and Orders: Machiavelli's The Prince (chaps. 1-12)
00:37:21
YaleCourses
29 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Political Philosophy (PLSC 114)

The lecture begins with an introduction of Machiavelli's life and the political scene in Renaissance Florence. Professor Smith asserts that Machiavelli can be credited as the founder of the modern state, having reconfigured elements from both the Christian empire and the Roman republic, creating therefore a new form of political organization that is distinctly his own. Machiavelli's state has universalist ambitions, just like its predecessors, but it has been liberated from Christian and classical conceptions of virtue. The management of affairs is left to the princes, a new kind of political leaders, endowed with ambition, love of glory, and even elements of prophetic authority.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction: Video of "The Third Man"
02:20 - Chapter 2. Introduction: Who Was Machiavelli?
15:33 - Chapter 3. "The Prince": Title and Dedication of the Book
21:52 - Chapter 4. The Distinction between Armed and Unarmed Prophets
26:10 - Chapter 5. Good and Evil, Virtue and Vice

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

9. The Mixed Regime and the Rule of Law: Aristotle's Politics, VII
00:46:13
YaleCourses
16 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Political Philosophy (PLSC 114)

This final lecture on Aristotle focuses on controlling conflict between factions. Polity as a mixture of the principles of oligarchy and democracy, is the regime that, according to Aristotle, can most successfully control factions and avoid dominance by either extreme. Professor Smith asserts that the idea of the polity anticipates Madison's call for a government in which powers are separated and kept in check and balance, avoiding therefore the extremes of both tyranny and civil war.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Polity: The Regime that Most Successfully Controls for Faction
07:30 - Chapter 2. The Importance of Property and Commerce for a Flourishing Republic
12:28 - Chapter 3. The Aristocratic Republic: A Model for the Best Regime
26:50 - Chapter 4. What Is Aristotle's Political Science?
35:21 - Chapter 5. Who Is a Statesman?
37:54 - Chapter 6. The Method of Aristotle's Political Science

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

8. The Mixed Regime and the Rule of Law: Aristotle's Politics, IV
00:47:59
YaleCourses
10 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Political Philosophy (PLSC 114)

The lecture discusses Aristotle's comparative politics with a special emphasis on the idea of the regime, as expressed in books III through VI in Politics. A regime, in the context of this major work, refers to both the formal enumeration of rights and duties within a community as well as to the distinctive customs, manners, moral dispositions and sentiments of that community. Aristotle asserts that it is precisely the regime that gives a people and a city their identity.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction: Aristotle's Comparative Politics and the Idea of the Regime
01:45 - Chapter 2. What Is a Regime?
13:58 - Chapter 3. What Are the Structures and Institutions of the Regime?
20:30 - Chapter 4. The Democratic Regime
34:35 - Chapter 5. Law, Conflict and the Regime
43:07 - Chapter 6. The Aristotelian Standard of Natural Right or Natural Justice

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

7. The Mixed Regime and the Rule of Law: Aristotle's Politics, I, III
00:43:46
YaleCourses
9 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Political Philosophy (PLSC 114)

The lecture begins with an introduction of Aristotle's life and works which constitute thematic treatises on virtually every topic, from biology to ethics to politics. Emphasis is placed on the Politics, in which Aristotle expounds his view on the naturalness of the city and his claim that man is a political animal by nature.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Aristotle: Plato's Adopted Son
12:45 - Chapter 2. Man Is, by Nature, the Political Animal
30:15 - Chapter 3. The Naturalness of Slavery

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

6. Philosophers and Kings: Plato's Republic, V
00:45:09
YaleCourses
12 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Political Philosophy (PLSC 114)

In this last session on the Republic, the emphasis is on the idea of self-control, as put forward by Adeimantus in his speech. Socrates asserts that the most powerful passion one needs to learn how to tame is what he calls thumos. Used to denote "spiritedness" and "desire," it is associated with ambitions for public life that both virtuous statesmen as well as great tyrants may pursue. The lecture ends with the platonic idea of justice as harmony in the city and the soul.

00:00 - Chapter 1. The Control of Passions
08:53 - Chapter 2. A Proposal for the Construction of KallipolIs
17:34 - Chapter 3. Justice
26:28 - Chapter 4. The Philosopher-King
33:26 - Chapter 5. What Are Plato's Views on Modern America?

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

5. Philosophers and Kings: Plato's Republic, III-IV
00:47:18
YaleCourses
7 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Political Philosophy (PLSC 114)

The discussion of the Republic continues. An account is given of the various figures, their role in the dialogue and what they represent in the work overall. Socrates challenges Polemarchus' argument on justice, questions the distinction between a friend and an enemy, and asserts his famous thesis that all virtues require knowledge and reflection at their basis.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Polemarchus
08:25 - Chapter 2. Thrasymachus
18:59 - Chapter 3. Glaucon
26:09 - Chapter 4. Adeimantus
37:28 - Chapter 5. Spiritedness and the Establishment of the Just City

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

4. Philosophers and Kings: Plato's Republic, I-II
00:47:15
YaleCourses
14 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Political Philosophy (PLSC 114)

Lecture 4 introduces Plato's Republic and its many meanings in the context of moral psychology, justice, the power of poetry and myth, and metaphysics. The Republic is also discussed as a utopia, presenting an extreme vision of a polis--Kallipolis--Plato's ideal city.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction
03:04 - Chapter 2. What Is Plato's "Republic" About?
17:38 - Chapter 3. I Went Down to the Piraeus
22:05 - Chapter 4. The Seventh Letter
30:00 - Chapter 5. Analyzing the Beginning of "Republic" and the Hierarchy of Characters
38:13 - Chapter 6. Cephalus

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

3. Socratic Citizenship: Plato's Crito
00:47:16
YaleCourses
34 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Political Philosophy (PLSC 114)

In the Apology, Socrates proposes a new kind of citizenship in opposition to the traditional one that was based on the poetic conception of Homer. Socrates' is a philosophical citizenship, relying on one's own powers of independent reason and judgment. The Crito, a dialogue taking place in Socrates' prison cell, is about civil obedience, piety, and the duty of every citizen to respect and live by the laws of the community.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Was Socrates Guilty or Innocent?
02:22 - Chapter 2. The Socratic Citizen
09:39 - Chapter 3. Principled DIsobedience to the Law
24:07 - Chapter 4. Crito's Apology: "Companion Dialogue"
42:22 - Chapter 5. Applying Lessons from Fourth-Century Athens to Our World Today

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

2. Socratic Citizenship: Plato's Apology
00:45:35
YaleCourses
8 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Political Philosophy (PLSC 114)

The lecture begins with an explanation of why Plato's Apology is the best introductory text to the study of political philosophy. The focus remains on the Apology as a symbol for the violation of free expression, with Socrates justifying his way of life as a philosopher and defending the utility of philosophy for political life.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction: Plato, Apology
09:31 - Chapter 2. Political Context of the Dialogue
19:19 - Chapter 3. Accusations Leveled Against Socrates
27:51 - Chapter 4. Clouds: Debunking Socrates' New Model of Citizenship
33:31 - Chapter 5. The Famous Socratic "Turn"; Socrates' Second Sailing

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

1.  Introduction: What is Political Philosophy?
00:37:06
YaleCourses
12 Views · 3 years ago

Introduction to Political Philosophy (PLSC 114)

Professor Smith discusses the nature and scope of "political philosophy." The oldest of the social sciences, the study of political philosophy must begin with the works of Plato and Aristotle, and examine in depth the fundamental concepts and categories of the study of politics. The questions "which regimes are best?" and "what constitutes good citizenship?" are posed and discussed in the context of Plato's Apology.

00:00 - Chapter 1. What Is Political Philosophy?
12:16 - Chapter 2. What Is a Regime?
22:19 - Chapter 3. Who Is a Statesman? What Is a Statesman?
27:22 - Chapter 4. What Is the Best Regime?

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

25. Democratic Justice: Applications
00:51:25
YaleCourses
6 Views · 3 years ago

Moral Foundations of Politics (PLSC 118)

Professor Shapiro guides the class through some practical applications of his theory of democratic justice. As applied to governing children, a sphere in which power-based hierarchy is inevitable, he circumscribes the role of the state as the fiduciary over children's basic interests and the role of parents as the fiduciaries over children's best interests. In other words, the state ensures the provision of the resources necessary for survival while the parents provide the resources to enable children to thrive as well as possible. Although some tensions will develop, such dual hierarchies enable a system of checks on these power relationships. And these hierarchies are self-liquidating once the child reaches adulthood, and because of self-determination, the child can no longer be disenfranchised. Professor Shapiro also examines hierarchy in the workplace. If exit costs are high, what he calls a Dickensian nightmare, then increased regulation is justified, but if we are living in a surfer's paradise, with low exit costs and a high social wage, then the firm's pursuit of efficiency should not be impeded. How regulation is applied depends on where the society falls on this continuum. In closing, Professor Shapiro offers his remarks about the staying power and legacy of democracy.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction: Democratic Justice and Last Class Recap
03:42 - Chapter 2. Democratic Justice at Home: Governing Children
30:03 - Chapter 3. Democratic Justice at Work: Sliding Quantum Rule
46:12 - Chapter 4. Tocqueville on Democracy

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Spring 2010.

24. Democratic Justice: Theory
00:47:16
YaleCourses
8 Views · 3 years ago

Moral Foundations of Politics (PLSC 118)

Professor Shapiro takes up again Schumpeter's minimalist conception of democracy. When operationalized as a two turnover test, this conception of democracy proves far from minimalist, yet people often expect other things from democracy, like delivering justice. Although people experiencing injustice under other types of governments often clamor for democracy, they become disillusioned with democracy when a particular regime fails to ensure greater justice for society. However, societies are also unwilling to swoop in with a scheme of justice that has not been democratically legitimated. Professor Shapiro proposes an approach that synthesizes both democracy and justice and pursues them together. His theory of democratic justice has several features which he outlines: (1) it rests on a broad conception of politics, (2) it is semi-contextual, (3) it distinguishes between superordinate and subordinate goods, and (4) embodies two dimensions of democracy, which are (a) collective self-government grounded in the principle of affected interest, and (b) institutionalized
opposition and presumption against hierarchy.

00:00 - Chapter 1. What Can We Expect from Democracy?
16:53 - Chapter 2. Democratic Justice
26:05 - Chapter 3. Democratic Justice: The General Argument

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Spring 2010.

23. Democracy and Majority Rule (II)
00:52:14
YaleCourses
18 Views · 3 years ago

Moral Foundations of Politics (PLSC 118)

Majority rule and democratic competition serve as the focus of this, second lecture on the democratic tradition. What it is about majority rule that confers legitimacy on collective decisions. Is there validity to a utilitarian justification, that catering to the wishes of the majority maximizes the happiness of the greatest number? Does majority rule reflect what Rousseau called the general will? What, even, is the general will? Does Arrow's paradox indicate that the results of voting are arbitrary? Is majority rule just an exercise in realpolitik? Professor Shapiro makes the point that crosscutting cleavages discussed on Monday are the key to unlocking majority rule and limiting the possibility of domination; although one may be in the majority today, the possibility of being in the minority tomorrow prevents tyranny. Several models of democracy are discussed: the public choice model of Buchanan and Tullock, Rae and Barry's critique of Buchanan and Tullock, Schumpeter's marketplace model, the Hotelling-Downs median voter theorem, and Huntington's two turnover test.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction: Majority Rule and Democratic Competition
11:38 - Chapter 2. Locke on Majority Rule
17:24 - Chapter 3. Why does Majority Rule Limit the Possibility of Domination?
25:55 - Chapter 4. Majority versus Unanimity Rule
30:32 - Chapter 5. Schumpeter: Non-dominant and Pluralist Competition

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Spring 2010.

22. Democracy and Majority Rule (I)
00:50:40
YaleCourses
6 Views · 3 years ago

Moral Foundations of Politics (PLSC 118)

Professor Shapiro transitions today to the third and final section of the course, an in-depth look at democracy and its institutions. According to him, democracy is the most successful at delivering on the mature Enlightenment's twin promises to recognize individual rights as the ultimate political good and to base politics on some kind of commitment to objective knowledge. And interestingly, democracy as a tradition was not made famous by its champions, but rather by its critics. Today, Professor Shapiro guides the class through the writings of Plato, Tocqueville, Madison, and Dahl. He zeroes in specifically on American democracy and such concepts as tyranny of the majority, factionalism, and checks and balances.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction and Last Class Recap
02:39 - Chapter 2. Democracy and Fear of Majority Tyranny
16:19 - Chapter 3. Madison and the Constitution: Majority Tyranny and Factions
38:03 - Chapter 4. Veto Points

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Spring 2010.

21. Contemporary Communitarianism (II)
00:47:41
YaleCourses
9 Views · 3 years ago

Moral Foundations of Politics (PLSC 118)

In this lecture, Professor Shapiro delves into the nuances of MacIntyre's argument, focusing specifically on his Aristotelian account of human psychology. It has two features: (1) man's nature is inherently teleological or purposive, and (2) human behavior is fundamentally other-directed, in that a person's happiness is conditioned upon the experience of others as it relates to him, particularly on the feeling of being valued by someone he values. MacIntyre's account of human psychology also highlights its malleability and its contingency. There is the untutored, or raw, condition, and there is that of having realized one's telos. Ethics are how one evolves from the former to the latter, but MacIntyre notes that ethics are designed to improve behavior, not to describe or aggregate it. Therefore, they cannot be deduced from true statements about human nature; this is his criticism of the Enlightenment project. But he does concede the Enlightenment notion that human beings are capable of thinking critically about purposes and goals. However, this can only come from within a system of norms to have an effect on the people it is intended to influence. Thus, the anti-Enlightenment story subordinates the individual to the practice, to the group, and to the inherited system of norms and values.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction: Aristotelian Conception of Human Psychology
20:26 - Chapter 2. Aristotle's Teleological Scheme and the Hopelessness of the Enlightenment Project
32:04 - Chapter 3. MacIntyre's Prescription

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Spring 2010.

20. Contemporary Communitarianism (I)
00:48:39
YaleCourses
5 Views · 3 years ago

Moral Foundations of Politics (PLSC 118)

In addition to the traditionalist-conservative view covered last time, the other anti-Enlightenment school the course explores is contemporary communitarianism. While Burke and Devlin appealed to tradition as the basis for our values, communitarians appeal to the community-accepted values as the basis for what should guide us. Communitarian Richard Rorty criticizes the Enlightenment endeavor of justifying philosophy from the ground up from indubitable premises as a fool's errand and a dangerous mug's game. The main focus of today's class is the communitarianism of Alasdair MacIntyre. Professor Shapiro introduces this school by exploring the symptoms of the problem wrought by the Enlightenment. One is the rise of emotivism and complete moral subjectivism; that is, the abandonment of the instruments for making moral judgments as a consequence of trying to justify philosophy from the ground up. The second symptom is the triumph of instrumentalism and the rejection of teleology, which is actually a coping mechanism for society's deep pluralism of values. Professor Shapiro discusses MacIntyre's two symptoms, as well as introduces his conceptions of practices and virtues.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction: Alasdair MacIntyre and Contemporary Communitarianism
05:25 - Chapter 2. Alasdair MacIntyre and Other Anti-enlightenment Thinkers
12:13 - Chapter 3. A Closer Look at MacIntyre's Book
16:18 - Chapter 4. Emotivism: From Subjective Certainty to Relativist Morality
22:52 - Chapter 5. Instrumentalism Has Triumphed: A Separation between Means and Ends
28:04 - Chapter 6. Emotivism and the Rejection of Teleology
41:24 - Chapter 7. Some Definitions: Practice and Virtue

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Spring 2010.

19. The Burkean Outlook
00:48:19
YaleCourses
13 Views · 3 years ago

Moral Foundations of Politics (PLSC 118)

Edmund Burke was an English politician who wrote his Reflections on the Revolution in France to express his disdain for the destructive havoc wrought by the French Revolution. As a traditionalist-conservative, he thinks about social change in a cautious and incremental way and characterizes the social contract as binding on those who are living, those who are dead, and those who are yet to be born. Studying the anti-Enlightenment differs from the study of the Enlightenment because traditional conservatives of the Burkean school reject the idea of formulating a theory upon which to base society. Their views can be more accurately characterized as attitudes or dispositions. Social change is possible, but it must reflect the thinking of "the man on the Clapham omnibus." Thinkers like Burke and Devlin place individuals as subordinate to society and its traditions. Therefore, the anti-Enlightenment is a rejection of both of the central tenets of the Enlightenment that have been covered in the course until now--the commitment to individual rights, and to science and reason.

00:00 - Chapter 1. The Anti-enlightenment: Edmund Burke (1729 -- 97)
07:27 - Chapter 2. The Human Condition: Fumbling in the Dark
09:07 - Chapter 3. The Value of Caution
14:48 - Chapter 4. Rights: Limited, Inherited, Not Reasoned
24:10 - Chapter 5. An Indissoluble Social Contract
35:36 - Chapter 6. Lord Devlin and The Wolfenden Report

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Spring 2010.

18. The "Political-not-Metaphysical" Legacy
00:49:17
YaleCourses
13 Views · 3 years ago

Moral Foundations of Politics (PLSC 118)

The mature Rawls departed quite a bit from his earlier theory of justice, choosing instead an overlapping consensus, or "political, not metaphysical" approach. Professor Shapiro argues that this is a significant departure from the Enlightenment tradition. In a wrap-up of the class's examination of the Enlightenment, Professor Shapiro charts its evolution from Locke to Bentham to Mill to Marx to contemporary theorists. As for the Enlightenment commitment to science and reason as the basis for politics, the early Enlightenment identified science with certainty, while the mature Enlightenment beginning with Mill emphasized the fallibility of science. But how rational are individuals after all? As for the second Enlightenment normative ideal of individual rights, the efforts to secularize the workmanship ideal after Locke were very problematic, culminating in the numerous and sound critiques of Marx and the intuitively disturbing radicalism of Rawls's moral arbitrariness. Professor Shapiro then introduces the backlash of the at-times unsatisfying consequences of the Enlightenment tradition, the anti-Enlightenment.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction: Last Class Recap and Class Agenda
07:05 - Chapter 2. Course Recap
18:49 - Chapter 3. Political, Not Metaphysical
28:35 - Chapter 4. The Normative Idea of Individual Rights

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Spring 2010.

17. Distributive Justice and the Welfare State
00:51:48
YaleCourses
6 Views · 3 years ago

Moral Foundations of Politics (PLSC 118)

The main focus of today's discussion is Rawls's third, and most problematic, principle is the difference principle, which states that income and wealth is to be distributed "to the greatest benefit of the least advantaged individual." This stems from the logic that what is good for the least advantaged individual will be good for the second-least advantaged, and the third, and so on. But what if slightly benefiting the least advantaged person comes at a huge cost to others? Professor Shapiro explores Rawls's defense. It is important to note that Rawls is not trying to give marginal policy advice, or even determine whether socialism or capitalism benefits the least advantaged (which he leaves to empirics), but trying to determine the basic structure of society. However, Professor Shapiro shows that the difference principle is not necessarily radical in the redistributive sense when compared with Pareto or Bentham, but it is radical in a philosophical sense. Rawls argues that the differences between individuals are morally arbitrary--it's moral luck that determines the family one is born into, what country one is born in, or one's capacities. However, some of the consequences are unsavory. Although Rawls tries in vain to exclude what one chooses to make of one's capacities, could not effort, or capacity to work, fall into this sphere as well? What is to be said of two equally intelligent people, one of who works hard and gets A's while the other lies on the couch and watches ESPN all day?

00:00 - Chapter 1. Principle of Justice I: Distribution of Liberties
04:46 - Chapter 2. Principle of Justice IIb: Fair Equality of Opportunity
09:16 - Chapter 3. Principle of Justice IIa: Incomes and Wealth
23:21 - Chapter 4. Incomes and Wealth: The Difference Principle
33:59 - Chapter 5. Incomes and Wealth: Rawls, Bentham and Pareto Compared

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Spring 2010.

16. The Rawlsian Social Contract
00:48:59
YaleCourses
14 Views · 3 years ago

Moral Foundations of Politics (PLSC 118)

The next and final Enlightenment tradition to be examined in the class is that of John Rawls, who, according to Professor Shapiro, was a hugely important figure not only in contemporary political philosophy, but also in the field of philosophy as a whole. Today, the class is introduced to some of the principal features of Rawls's theory of justice, such as the original position and the veil of ignorance, two of Rawls's most important philosophical innovations. Rawls channels Kant's categorical imperative because he asks individuals who would hypothetically be making choices about the structure of society to consider what would be desirable regardless of who they turned out to be--high IQ or low IQ, male or female, black or white, rich or poor. Rawls does not want to consider utility or welfare, but rather something more concrete--resources. And for him, these resources are liberties, opportunities, income and wealth, and the social bases of self-respect. The first of these leads to Rawls's first principle of justice, which states, "Each person is to have an equal right to the most extensive total system of liberties compatible with a similar system of liberty for all." Professor Shapiro animates this principle by asking, "Should there be an established religion?" For Rawls, the approach to answering this question is from the standpoint of the most adversely affected person.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Political Liberalism: John Rawls (1921 -- 2002)
11:59 - Chapter 2. Insights and Questions in Rawls's Theory of Justice
34:15 - Chapter 3. Resourcism and The General Conception of Justice

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Spring 2010.

15. Compensation versus Redistribution
00:46:09
YaleCourses
8 Views · 3 years ago

Moral Foundations of Politics (PLSC 118)

The class's examination of Nozick's minimal state has raised a number of important questions, most of which are rooted in his troublesome model of compensation. Nozick's would respond with his threefold account of justice: (1) justice in acquisition, (2) justice in transfer, and (3) rectification of past injustices. Nozick brilliantly demonstrates that "liberty upsets patterns"--even thought we can originally start off with any just distribution, allowing voluntary transactions creates an unequal distribution of wealth. At some point, transactions actually stop being voluntary, however, when some would say the government should step in. But Nozick argues that because there is a deep pluralism of values and we cannot agree on what this point should be, we must keep this redistribution to an absolute minimum as not to impose anyone's views on anyone else. This is how he distinguishes between redistribution and compensation. His model of compensation is backward-looking and doesn't require us to agree on a pattern. It asks what is necessary to make the harmed person whole again. Although addressing individual harms is easier than looking for a pattern applicable to society as whole, Nozick fails to address the question of how far backward we must look in compensating for past injustices.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction: Components of Nozickian Justice
01:42 - Chapter 2. Justice in Acquisition and Justice in Transfer
35:45 - Chapter 3. Compensation: Rectification of Past Injustices

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Spring 2010.

14. Rights as Side Constraints and the Minimal State
00:47:19
YaleCourses
11 Views · 3 years ago

Moral Foundations of Politics (PLSC 118)

Today, Professor Shapiro dives more deeply into Robert Nozick's theory of the minimal, or night watchman, state. This formulation is not redistributive, nor does it consider rights as goals, but rather as side-constraints on what we can do. In other words, Nozick's is a deontological, not teleological, approach. However, the Achilles' heel of this formulation is the incorporation of independents, based on a system of compensation. Some people will opt not to enter into our hypothetical social contract, but for the dominant protective association to protect its members from the fear of these independents, they must be forced to incorporate. Nozick thinks that if members could compensate the independents for this rights violation, it would legitimize the state. Unfortunately, no one has ever solved the puzzle of compensation without some interpersonal comparison of utility. But another way to salvage Nozick's account is with the Kantian dictum "ought entails can," meaning that since independents cannot be tolerated, it cannot be an obligation not to violate their rights. But what if the independents could compensate the members for their fear? And couldn't this compensation model be used to justify the welfare state as well? Isn't the value of consent, in which Nozick's account is rooted, completely violated here?

00:00 - Chapter 1. Evolution of the State without Rights Violations
15:50 - Chapter 2. Nozick's Theory of the Only Legitimate State
20:57 - Chapter 3. A Compensation Test That Is Compatible with the Pareto System
23:17 - Chapter 4. Neoclassical Utilitarianism: The Pareto Diagram

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Spring 2010.

13. Appropriating Locke Today
00:46:36
YaleCourses
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Moral Foundations of Politics (PLSC 118)

The final Enlightenment tradition left to be explored in this course is social contract theory, for which we must return to Locke and somehow secularize his views and reconcile them with the refutation of natural rights. Modern social contract theorists replace natural rights with Kant's categorical imperatives, and accept the Aristotelian notion that there is no such thing as pre-political man. They approach the social contract as a hypothetical thought experiment, asking, if there were no state, what kind of state, if any, would people like you and I create? The first modern social contract theorist Professor Shapiro introduces is Robert Nozick, whose theory derives from the voluntary entry of individuals into mutual protective associations in the absence of a state. But he also makes two important points about force: (1) for coercive force to be a good, it has to be exercised as a monopoly, and (2) there's no other natural monopoly. Therefore, a dominant protective association will come out on top and resemble the state. But one problem remains: the incorporation of independents into this state.

00:00 - Chapter 1. The Social Contract Tradition: Robert Nozick (1938 -- 2002)
22:58 - Chapter 2. Kant, Nozick and the Conception of Individual Liberty
32:53 - Chapter 3. Evolution of the State without Rights Violations

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Spring 2010.

12. The Marxian Failure and Legacy
00:46:54
YaleCourses
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Moral Foundations of Politics (PLSC 118)

We previously established that the reality of scarcity invalidates Marx's core idea of superabundance, and mortally wounds his theory. Certainly, his historical predictions about worker-led socialist revolutions around the world were off-mark. Today, Professor Shapiro presents more of the shortcomings of the Marxian tradition. These include Marx's failure to account for the ability of the state to buttress capitalism and stave off the conditions needed for its self-destruction, the lack of a declining tendency in the economy-wide rate of profit, and the incoherence of a labor theory of value. It becomes clear that the Marxian theory is riddled with holes. However, Marx does leave two important legacies in his wake: a good critique of markets as distributors of either good or harms in society, and a power-based argument about freedom.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction: Failures of Marxism
05:01 - Chapter 2. Failures of Marxism: Macro Theory
21:52 - Chapter 3. Failures of Marxism: Micro Theory

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Spring 2010.

11. Marxian Exploitation and Distributive Justice
00:47:33
YaleCourses
6 Views · 3 years ago

Moral Foundations of Politics (PLSC 118)

Exploitation is an important technical--not normative--concept in the theory of Karl Marx. Although we are dealing with voluntary Pareto transactions, under capitalism, exploitation occurs whether or not an individual is better off. Capitalism is destined to fail, says Marx, because of (1) the possibility for liquidity crises, (2) the nature of capitalist competition inducing declining marginal profit on the industry-wide level, (3) the fact that capitalist competition eliminates competitors and promotes monopolies, (4) weak demand, as workers could not pool their money and buy all that they produce, and (5) the fact that "workers will come to realize that they have nothing to lose but their chains." However, communism (that distribution should be "to each according to his needs") can only arise from socialism ("to each according to his work"), which in turn can only arise from superabundance created by capitalism. However, scarcity is very much a reality, which makes superabundance impossible; this, Professor Shapiro points out, is the major weakness in Marx's theory.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Relative and Absolute Surplus Value and Rate of Exploitation
07:08 - Chapter 2. Five Sources of Crisis in Capitalist Systems
23:36 - Chapter 3. Features of Socialism and Capitalism

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Spring 2010.

10. Marx's Theory of Capitalism
00:51:15
YaleCourses
6 Views · 3 years ago

Moral Foundations of Politics (PLSC 118)

Today, Professor Shapiro continues his discussion of Enlightenment theory of Karl Marx, focusing on the foundations of his theory of capitalism. The central question is, how is wealth created under capitalism at the micro level? For Marx, Adam Smith's invisible hand is not entirely benevolent. His labor theory of value stipulates that living human labor-power is the only way to create new value, and therefore capitalists who shift toward capital-intensive production cannot actually create new value. Marx also assumes wages are at the level of subsistence, and that capitalists turn a profit by exploiting the surplus labor time of workers. Professor Shapiro also explores some corollary concepts to Marx's mode of production--the class-for-itself/class-in-itself distinction, socially necessary labor time and surplus labor time, and the extent to which workers are other-referential.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction: Class Agenda and Marx's Characterization of Freedom
07:12 - Chapter 2. Marx's Theory of Science
16:37 - Chapter 3. The Labor Theory of Value; Exploitation and Injustice
22:37 - Chapter 4. The Labor Theory of Surplus Value
35:37 - Chapter 5. Relative & Absolute Surplus Value & Rate of Exploitation

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses